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Question about how crude a legitimate Windows XP OEM CD can possibly be RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello all. To start, I have not actually tried WGA validation yet, because upon opening the product I suspected it was counterfeit and so wanted to avoid installing it if possible.

    So: I am building a system, and purchased an OEM copy of Windows XP Professional SP3 which seemed suspect upon arrival. I want to contact the seller for a refund, but first I would like to verify that I'm not crazy and something really is wrong here.

    These are the things I've found suspicious upon examining the product that arrived:

    • The basic user manual-thingie that comes with OEM editions is absolutely filled with typos: "youcan", "yuor", "prat" instead of "part", "wont" (no apostrophe), "user accpunt" ... it looks like someone used OCR software while drunk.
    • The Windows XP CD has tiny little bubbles/bumps on the surface at several locations
    • The Windows XP CD design has a slightly raised edge
    • The Windows XP flag does not "wave" when the disc is turned (although the "WINDOWS" block does turn to "GENUINE" when turned)
    • Upon applying slight pressure to the edge of the CD design, it peeled up, revealing a translucent plastic layer with cracked and flaking holographic material underneath

    I'm pretty sure I'm correct in assuming this is counterfeit, but I always prefer to verify my assumptions before making a claim as serious as seller fraud. So, given the information I've provided so far, is it at all possible, in any way, for this CD to be a genuine Microsoft OEM edition?

    I will happily provide pictures / more information if needed. :)

    Friday, December 3, 2010 5:22 AM

Answers

  • "Lovestar" wrote in message news:6fa3ecaa-d227-405f-a3fd-541d3375f81f...

    I have not installed the product, because it seems suspicious and I've had some bad run-ins with cleverly-disguised malware in the past. The computer-in-progress itself is also in approximately 25 pieces on my table at the moment, making OS installation awkward. :)

    The product was purchased "brand new and sealed" on eBay from a reseller with 100% positive feedback who claimed he had extra copies after exiting the system-building industry himself. Normally I would only go through official retailers to obtain an OS, but I'm in a difficult position because Windows XP must be used for this system due to driver and software incompatibilities with Vista/7, so I took a chance.

    I know y'all prefer I run those tools first, and I do understand if you can't give me a definite answer without them. I just thought it was worth trying to check whether any of these signs were outright deal-breakers when deciding if the product is genuine.


    I got as far an 'eBay' and stopped reading - it's almost guaranteed that your disks are counterfeit.
    Demand a refund from the vendor, and pursue them through eBay/PayPal's procedures

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, December 7, 2010 8:43 PM
    Friday, December 3, 2010 7:11 PM
    Moderator
  • Hello Lovestar,

    I'd agree with Noel that there is virually zero/nada/zip/zilch/zed chance of this being a Genuine disc.

    The bubbles and raised edge are likely due the the fake label being affixed to the top surface of the disc.  Real discs have the holographic label embedded within the plastic of the disc.

    It is getting more difficult to find Genuine XP for sale.

    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, December 7, 2010 8:43 PM
    Sunday, December 5, 2010 4:22 AM

All replies

  • "Lovestar" wrote in message news:a264e011-ca19-4055-9b56-a213494750f2...

    Hello all. To start, I have not actually tried WGA validation yet, because upon opening the product I suspected it was counterfeit and so wanted to avoid installing it if possible.

    So: I am building a system, and purchased an OEM copy of Windows XP Professional SP3 which seemed suspect upon arrival. I want to contact the seller for a refund, but first I would like to verify that I'm not crazy and something really is wrong here.

    These are the things I've found suspicious upon examining the product that arrived:

    • The basic user manual-thingie that comes with OEM editions is absolutely filled with typos: "youcan", "yuor", "prat" instead of "part", "wont" (no apostrophe), "user accpunt" ... it looks like someone used OCR software while drunk.
    • The Windows XP CD has tiny little bubbles/bumps on the surface at several locations
    • The Windows XP CD design has a slightly raised edge
    • The Windows XP flag does not "wave" when the disc is turned (although the "WINDOWS" block does turn to "GENUINE" when turned)
    • Upon applying slight pressure to the edge of the CD design, it peeled up, revealing a translucent plastic layer with cracked and flaking holographic material underneath

    I'm pretty sure I'm correct in assuming this is counterfeit, but I always prefer to verify my assumptions before making a claim as serious as seller fraud. So, given the information I've provided so far, is it at all possible, in any way, for this CD to be a genuine Microsoft OEM edition?

    I will happily provide pictures / more information if needed. :)


    If you've installed the product, run the MGADiag tool - post the results, and we'll take a look.
    From what you've said above, this does appear to be a relatively poor counterfeit - who was the supplier?
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Friday, December 3, 2010 6:34 AM
    Moderator
  • I have not installed the product, because it seems suspicious and I've had some bad run-ins with cleverly-disguised malware in the past. The computer-in-progress itself is also in approximately 25 pieces on my table at the moment, making OS installation awkward. :)

    The product was purchased "brand new and sealed" on eBay from a reseller with 100% positive feedback who claimed he had extra copies after exiting the system-building industry himself. Normally I would only go through official retailers to obtain an OS, but I'm in a difficult position because Windows XP must be used for this system due to driver and software incompatibilities with Vista/7, so I took a chance.

    I know y'all prefer I run those tools first, and I do understand if you can't give me a definite answer without them. I just thought it was worth trying to check whether any of these signs were outright deal-breakers when deciding if the product is genuine.

    Friday, December 3, 2010 5:07 PM
  • "Lovestar" wrote in message news:6fa3ecaa-d227-405f-a3fd-541d3375f81f...

    I have not installed the product, because it seems suspicious and I've had some bad run-ins with cleverly-disguised malware in the past. The computer-in-progress itself is also in approximately 25 pieces on my table at the moment, making OS installation awkward. :)

    The product was purchased "brand new and sealed" on eBay from a reseller with 100% positive feedback who claimed he had extra copies after exiting the system-building industry himself. Normally I would only go through official retailers to obtain an OS, but I'm in a difficult position because Windows XP must be used for this system due to driver and software incompatibilities with Vista/7, so I took a chance.

    I know y'all prefer I run those tools first, and I do understand if you can't give me a definite answer without them. I just thought it was worth trying to check whether any of these signs were outright deal-breakers when deciding if the product is genuine.


    I got as far an 'eBay' and stopped reading - it's almost guaranteed that your disks are counterfeit.
    Demand a refund from the vendor, and pursue them through eBay/PayPal's procedures

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, December 7, 2010 8:43 PM
    Friday, December 3, 2010 7:11 PM
    Moderator
  • Well, alright. Thank you for your time, Mr. Paton + Microsoft Forums community. :)
    Saturday, December 4, 2010 2:24 AM
  • Hello Lovestar,

    I'd agree with Noel that there is virually zero/nada/zip/zilch/zed chance of this being a Genuine disc.

    The bubbles and raised edge are likely due the the fake label being affixed to the top surface of the disc.  Real discs have the holographic label embedded within the plastic of the disc.

    It is getting more difficult to find Genuine XP for sale.

    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, December 7, 2010 8:43 PM
    Sunday, December 5, 2010 4:22 AM