locked
Licenses. Per user or per PC? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I can only use one PC at a time.  I can only drive one car at a time?  I can only watch one TV at a time.

    In the UK one driving license allows you to drive as many cars as you like.  One TV lisence allows you to have another TV in the kitchen or bedroom or wherever you like as long as it is in the same private dwelling.

    So why do we have to have a licence for each PC we own?  Sure the license should cover the user and not the PC.  Isn't that why it's called a user license?

    Any comments?

    Friday, May 5, 2006 5:41 PM

Answers

  • Hello,

     

    I understand your concerns and hope that by eading the EULA included in Windows XP when it is installed can answer many of the questions oyu have here.

     

    To address your other questions:

    1. The COA is not associated with any individual and cannot be used to identify anyone

    2. I am not sure what you are referring to here.

    3. We cannot speak to possibe pricing and marketing of our products

     

    hth

    davar

    Monday, May 8, 2006 3:28 AM

All replies

  • PrivateUser:

    The EULA is for one software license. If you ensure our Product Activation team that only one copy is installed at a time, there will be no problems using different computers. But you will have to activate over telephone and go thruogh a series of security checks.

     

    -Phil Liu

    Friday, May 5, 2006 6:42 PM
  • In the FAQ in the main page it states that your license is not transferable.  I should be able to use my PC during the day while I am working and my laptop in the evening while watching TV. I shouldn't have to uninstall it each time I swop machines. 

    That means I would have to call Microsoft, go through the installation procedure, activate it over the phone and set the whole thing up each morning and each evening.

    That's like saying you can only drive a second car while another is off the road??  Or you have to switch off a TV when you leave the room.

    Regards.

    Friday, May 5, 2006 6:50 PM
  • The software licenses are only for one installation of Windows at a time. :)
    Friday, May 5, 2006 7:12 PM
  • I am based in the UK and once upon a time BT (British Telecom) had the monopoly on telephone services.  They took their customers from granted but it all changed and now with so many telephone services in the UK to choose from they had customers leaving very quickly and choosing alternative companies to supply their telephone services.

    The same happened with British Gas and Seeboard (electric). I think Microsoft with their high prices will go the same way.  Ever played Monopoly?  Eventually the game can not go any further.

    I think it's just a case of an alternative operating system to come along... and it will.  It doesn't even have to be better than XP.  As long as it is as good and Windows 98 I think Microsoft will certainly be hit hard.

     

    Friday, May 5, 2006 8:06 PM
  • But why Phil??

    What is the reason for genuine microsoft users having to pay £150 + for an OS for every computer they have in there home! You and i both know MS have the capability to see who is and who is not playing ball... every computer is identifiable and if its on a LAN then the other computers to are identifiable. So the use of one OS (licensed ofcourse) on all the computers on that LAN could be accounted for.

    I think users should be able to declare how many computers they wish to install it on from the first activation proccess, and MS can do the relevent checks to make sure that its all ligit! (Which you do anyway for one installation) As long as we declare our intentions from the start then is that not an oportunity for MS to work on to get people back to Windows, before they start going to the likes of Linux? (Which in my opinion will become the Factory Installation on most systems in buisness and private use)

    I say this because i want to stay with microsoft and not have to learn the likes of linux.

     

    Friday, May 5, 2006 10:53 PM
  • KD101:

     

    Microsoft cannot take any identifiable information (PII) to link one person to a specific place or computer.

    We cannot legally do anything like what you suggested.

    -Phil Liu

    Saturday, May 6, 2006 1:55 AM
  • hmmm

    Yet you somehow identify the coa or license number. If you find that you've got a duplicate you're able to throw and error indicating that it is not a valid copy.

    What would it take to check if the total number of identical licenses is only two? Would that be an indication that someone has more than one computer, and is just using them therefore, one at a time?

    And again, now that you've solved the piracy problem, will the cost of the OS be dropping down to a $20.00 level? There's no longer a need to charge the inflated price anymore, since everyone is going to be required to buy a license for each room in there house, right?

    Joe

    Sunday, May 7, 2006 5:42 PM
  • Hello,

     

    I understand your concerns and hope that by eading the EULA included in Windows XP when it is installed can answer many of the questions oyu have here.

     

    To address your other questions:

    1. The COA is not associated with any individual and cannot be used to identify anyone

    2. I am not sure what you are referring to here.

    3. We cannot speak to possibe pricing and marketing of our products

     

    hth

    davar

    Monday, May 8, 2006 3:28 AM
  • Same reason a marriage license can be used to only marry one person or a vehicle's registration tag can only be used on one vehicle...
    Sunday, May 21, 2006 6:21 PM
    Moderator
  • According to the License agreement, MS SW Licenses are bound to the Machine, like a Tax Disc is to your car. We have 3 user accounts on our family PC but we only need one license, I prefer it this way rather than having it bound to persons.

    For practical reasons, I think the more flexible approach of bending licenses accross multiple hardware is taken with Development Licenses (where you constantly need to install new versions  for test and dev purposes); in that case it usually goes by head count (number of employees using the software rather than machines). but these are usually a lot more expensive.

    hth
    realraven
    Wednesday, May 24, 2006 4:17 PM