locked
Installed previously, now it says not valid on reinstall RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm sure I'm not the only one in this boat but here goes.

    A year and a half ago I purchased the student edition of Windows 7 on the $30 promotion.  At the time, there was no indication that this was an "upgrade only" version of Win7 - I even emailed Microsoft customer service about it and I was assured it was a full version.  Unfortunately, the license key I was given is indeed an "upgrade only" key.

    Fast forward to the present day.  I have just retired my old PC, which was about to tick over the four year mark, and it has had its Win7 wiped and replaced with an ancient copy of Windows XP I had from a much older computer. (It's going to become the media center computer for the house now.)  The shiny new system was home built on a budget, and I intended to put my student copy of Windows 7 on it.

    License key says it can only be used for upgrades, however.  Here's the diagnostics:

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):

    -----------------------------------------

    Windows Validation Data-->

     

    Validation Code: 50

    Cached Online Validation Code: N/A, hr = 0xc004f012

    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-74XYM-BH4JX-XM76F

    Windows Product Key Hash: KeYfcvXg/a1Q01x73+f8IL/JC4Y=

    Windows Product ID: 00359-112-0000007-85953

    Windows Product ID Type: 5

    Windows License Type: Retail

    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003

    ID: {FDA06C1A-37A2-4399-BA56-B7D1EE384911}(1)

    Is Admin: Yes

    TestCab: 0x0

    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Product Name: Windows 7 Home Premium

    Architecture: 0x00000009

    Build lab: 7601.win7sp1_rtm.101119-1850

    TTS Error: 

    Validation Diagnostic: 

    Resolution Status: N/A

     

    Vista WgaER Data-->

    ThreatID(s): N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

     

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->

    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    File Exists: No

    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

     

    OGA Notifications Data-->

    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

     

    OGA Data-->

    Office Status: 109 N/A

    OGA Version: N/A, 0x80070002

    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-364-80041010_025D1FF3-229-80041010_025D1FF3-230-1_025D1FF3-517-80040154_025D1FF3-237-80040154_025D1FF3-238-2_025D1FF3-244-80070002_025D1FF3-258-3

     

    Browser Data-->

    Proxy settings: N/A

    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)

    Default Browser: C:\Users\Cathy\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\Application\chrome.exe

    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt

    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled

    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed

    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled

    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled

    Active scripting: Allowed

    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

     

    File Scan Data-->

     

    Other data-->

    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{FDA06C1A-37A2-4399-BA56-B7D1EE384911}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003</OS><Architecture>x64</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-XM76F</PKey><PID>00359-112-0000007-85953</PID><PIDType>5</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-3741792830-1387077771-1217994865</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>MSI</Manufacturer><Model>MS-7623</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>American Megatrends Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>V11.8</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="6"/><Date>20101201000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>1E453007018400F2</HWID><UserLCID>0409</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Eastern Standard Time(GMT-05:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults>  

     

    Spsys.log Content: 0x80070002

     

    Licensing Data-->

    Software licensing service version: 6.1.7601.17514

     

    Name: Windows(R) 7, HomePremium edition

    Description: Windows Operating System - Windows(R) 7, RETAIL channel

    Activation ID: 2e7d060d-4714-40f2-9896-1e4f15b612ad

    Application ID: 55c92734-d682-4d71-983e-d6ec3f16059f

    Extended PID: 00359-00170-112-000000-00-1033-7600.0000-0772011

    Installation ID: 014160325855641895881522995854274743000445431683055220

    Processor Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88338

    Machine Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88339

    Use License URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88341

    Product Key Certificate URL: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=88340

    Partial Product Key: XM76F

    License Status: Notification

    Notification Reason: 0xC004F009 (grace time expired).

    Remaining Windows rearm count: 4

    Trusted time: 4/22/2011 11:38:08 PM

     

    Windows Activation Technologies-->

    HrOffline: 0x00000000

    HrOnline: 0xC004C532

    HealthStatus: 0x0000000000000000

    Event Time Stamp: 4:22:2011 23:34

    ActiveX: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395

    Admin Service: Registered, Version: 7.1.7600.16395

    HealthStatus Bitmask Output:

     

     

    HWID Data-->

    HWID Hash Current: MgAAAAEABAABAAEAAAACAAAAAQABAAEA6GHSeSruEDNU8o4wFLAW1857Yj1cYFKyQho=

     

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->

    N/A

     

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->

    BIOS valid for OA 2.0: yes, but no SLIC table

    Windows marker version: N/A

    OEMID and OEMTableID Consistent: N/A

    BIOS Information: 

      ACPI Table Name OEMID Value OEMTableID Value

      APIC 7623MS A7623200

      FACP 7623MS A7623200

      SRAT AMD   FAM_F_10

      HPET 7623MS OEMHPET 

      MCFG 7623MS OEMMCFG 

      OEMB 7623MS A7623200

      SSDT A M I POWERNOW

     

    So the last time I went through this, which was also an upgrade from XP, I was told I couldn't do a direct upgrade from XP, it had to be done as a clean install.  This go round I didn't bother putting XP on the new system first because I figured it wasn't necessary.

    So what do I do? My "clean install" says my license isn't valid, my Windows XP has already been put to use on another system, and I don't have any valid copies of Vista lying around to use. 

    Am I going to have to remove the Windows XP from the media center system just so I can do a reinstall of this and "upgrade" it?  Am I going to have to go through this mess any time I want to do a clean install of the OS? (something that Win7 thankfully doesn't need nearly as frequently as XP did, I've found.)

    Saturday, April 23, 2011 3:52 AM

Answers

  • "cblakeney" wrote in message news:a5b21144-83ec-492f-825e-415c568f9838...

    I'm sure I'm not the only one in this boat but here goes.

    A year and a half ago I purchased the student edition of Windows 7 on the $30 promotion.  At the time, there was no indication that this was an "upgrade only" version of Win7 - I even emailed Microsoft customer service about it and I was assured it was a full version.  Unfortunately, the license key I was given is indeed an "upgrade only" key.

    Fast forward to the present day.  I have just retired my old PC, which was about to tick over the four year mark, and it has had its Win7 wiped and replaced with an ancient copy of Windows XP I had from a much older computer. (It's going to become the media center computer for the house now.)  The shiny new system was home built on a budget, and I intended to put my student copy of Windows 7 on it.

    License key says it can only be used for upgrades, however.  Here's the diagnostics:

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):

    -----------------------------------------

    Windows Validation Data-->

     

    Validation Code: 50

    Cached Online Validation Code: N/A, hr = 0xc004f012

    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-74XYM-BH4JX-XM76F

    Windows Product Key Hash: KeYfcvXg/a1Q01x73+f8IL/JC4Y=

    Windows Product ID: 00359-112-0000007-85953

    Windows Product ID Type: 5

    Windows License Type: Retail

    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003

    So what do I do? My "clean install" says my license isn't valid, my Windows XP has already been put to use on another system, and I don't have any valid copies of Vista lying around to use. 

    Am I going to have to remove the Windows XP from the media center system just so I can do a reinstall of this and "upgrade" it?  Am I going to have to go through this mess any time I want to do a clean install of the OS? (something that Win7 thankfully doesn't need nearly as frequently as XP did, I've found.)


    There are a couple of problems with your usage .
    1) when you use an upgrade license, the old 'qualifying license' cannot legally be re-used elsewhere, as it's subsumed into the upgraded license.
    2) You've used what is an Upgrade license in a clean install - and to do that you've had to initially use the Default (Keyless Install) Key - and that has now run out of the grace period allowed for activation. Since you're using the qualifying license elsewhere, you cannot use it to qualify this system for the Upgrade.
     
    Your current PC as a result is unlicensed
     
    Options....
    1) purchase a copy of XP or Vista, activate, and then upgrade using your Upgrade DVD.
    2) purchase a new Full Retail copy of Win 7 Home Premium and use the Key from that to make your system genuine.
    3) purchase an OEM System Builder of whichever edition of Win 7 you want, and install that - it will be a clean install, as it's not possible to do repair installs with OEM software. It's also not recommended, as the license becomes locked to the motherboard, and cannot be moved to another machine, and you also lose entitlement to MS Support.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by cblakeney Saturday, April 23, 2011 3:19 PM
    Saturday, April 23, 2011 6:39 AM
    Moderator
  • It is with regret that I must disagree strongly with Noel and others who sometimes advise end users to acquire and use OEM system builder copies of Windows.  I realize that most users have never seen a system builder license.  It is not at all the same as the OEM end user license agreement (EULA).  The SB license is always removed before the customer receives the computer it is installed on. 

    Here is the pertinent part of the SB license.  It clearly does NOT grant the purchaser of an OEM pack any end user rights.  It restricts the purchaser of OEM software to installation on a computer sold to a third party (customer) and prohibits the purchaser from using the software himself.  SB packs are clearly NOT for end users.  I have highlighted salient points.

    MICROSOFT OEM SYSTEM BUILDER LICENSE 

    (Visit www.microsoft.com/oem for additional OEM System Builder information) 

    1 Definitions. 

    a. "Customer System" means a fully assembled computer system that includes a CPU, a motherboard, a power supply, an internally mounted NAND or revolving magnetic-based hard drive, and a case. 

    b. "Distribution" and "Distribute" mean the point in time when a Customer System leaves your control. 

    c. "Hardware" means the Microsoft hardware included in the Peck. A unit of Hardware includes any software and end user documentation that may be included in the Pack. 

    d. "OPK" means the OEM preinstallation kit provided by Microsoft that includes installation instructions, utilities and tools for preinstalIing the Software. 

    e. "Package" means this package of Microsoft Software or Hardware. 

    f. "Software" means the Microsoft software inside the Pack. A unit of  Software includes any software media, documentation, certificate of authenticity ("COA') label, end user license terms and security devices.  

    2. Authorized Distribution and Acceptance. To distribute the Software or Hardware in this Pack, you must be a System Builder and accept this license. 'System Builder' means an original equipment manufacturer, an assembler, a refurbisher, or a software pre-installer that sells the Customer System(s) to a third party. You accept this license when you open this Pack. If you choose not to accept this license, promptly return the unopened Pack to your distributor. You may only distribute unopened Packs within your territory. For the territory in which you may distribute, see www.mirosoft.com/oem/sblicense/territory. Individual Software or Hardware units may not be returned after the Pack is opened.

    3. Parties. Microsoft Licensing, GP ("MLGP"), a general partnership organized under the laws of the State of Nevada, grants this license to you. However, if you are located in Europe, the Middle East or Africa, then this license is granted by Microsoft Ireland Operations Limited ("MIOL"), a company organized under the laws of Ireland. The terms "we", "our", "us", or "Microsoft" mean MLGP or MIOL.

    4. Limited license. If you comply with the terms of this license, Microsoft grants you a limited license to distribute the Software or Hardware. Except as granted in this license, you may not use, run, copy, modify, display, distribute, repackage or reassemble the Software, Hardware, OPK or any part of them. You may not reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble the Software, Hardware or OPK, except to the extent expressly permitted by this license or by applicable law notwithstanding this prohibition.  All rights not expressly granted are reserved.

    There is more but this is the pertinent part.

    The correct license for an end user purchasing Windows, including those building their own computers and doing favors for friends and relatives, is RETAIL.

     


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Saturday, April 23, 2011 3:49 PM
    Answerer
  • Colin and I have actually talked about this a bit and his reasoning was compelling.

    Compelling enough that I went and looked up the OEM Licensing for myself. (Note the OEM Licensing and the OEM EULA are different. The former is for the person Making the PC, the later is for the person using the PC).  As you can see from Colin's post (the underlined section) When using OEM software, the Maker of the PC and the User of the PC must ALWAYS be different people.

     

    In other words, to qualify under the OEM Licensing, a PC using OEM software must be sold to a 3rd party.

     


    Darin MS
    Monday, April 25, 2011 9:47 PM

All replies

  • Since you cannot reuse the qualifying Windows XP operating system license on a different computer once you upgrade to Windows 7 with an upgrade license, your choices are:

    1) Remove Windows XP from the old computer via reformatting the hard drive, then install it on the newer computer, then upgrade to Windows 7 (please note that during Windows 7 installation, a licensing compliance check for a qualifying Windows operating system license is performed in order to use a Windows 7 upgrade license).

    or

    2)  Purchase a "Full License" Windows 7 edition and install it.


    Carey Frisch
    Saturday, April 23, 2011 6:23 AM
    Moderator
  • "cblakeney" wrote in message news:a5b21144-83ec-492f-825e-415c568f9838...

    I'm sure I'm not the only one in this boat but here goes.

    A year and a half ago I purchased the student edition of Windows 7 on the $30 promotion.  At the time, there was no indication that this was an "upgrade only" version of Win7 - I even emailed Microsoft customer service about it and I was assured it was a full version.  Unfortunately, the license key I was given is indeed an "upgrade only" key.

    Fast forward to the present day.  I have just retired my old PC, which was about to tick over the four year mark, and it has had its Win7 wiped and replaced with an ancient copy of Windows XP I had from a much older computer. (It's going to become the media center computer for the house now.)  The shiny new system was home built on a budget, and I intended to put my student copy of Windows 7 on it.

    License key says it can only be used for upgrades, however.  Here's the diagnostics:

     

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):

    -----------------------------------------

    Windows Validation Data-->

     

    Validation Code: 50

    Cached Online Validation Code: N/A, hr = 0xc004f012

    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-74XYM-BH4JX-XM76F

    Windows Product Key Hash: KeYfcvXg/a1Q01x73+f8IL/JC4Y=

    Windows Product ID: 00359-112-0000007-85953

    Windows Product ID Type: 5

    Windows License Type: Retail

    Windows OS version: 6.1.7601.2.00010300.1.0.003

    So what do I do? My "clean install" says my license isn't valid, my Windows XP has already been put to use on another system, and I don't have any valid copies of Vista lying around to use. 

    Am I going to have to remove the Windows XP from the media center system just so I can do a reinstall of this and "upgrade" it?  Am I going to have to go through this mess any time I want to do a clean install of the OS? (something that Win7 thankfully doesn't need nearly as frequently as XP did, I've found.)


    There are a couple of problems with your usage .
    1) when you use an upgrade license, the old 'qualifying license' cannot legally be re-used elsewhere, as it's subsumed into the upgraded license.
    2) You've used what is an Upgrade license in a clean install - and to do that you've had to initially use the Default (Keyless Install) Key - and that has now run out of the grace period allowed for activation. Since you're using the qualifying license elsewhere, you cannot use it to qualify this system for the Upgrade.
     
    Your current PC as a result is unlicensed
     
    Options....
    1) purchase a copy of XP or Vista, activate, and then upgrade using your Upgrade DVD.
    2) purchase a new Full Retail copy of Win 7 Home Premium and use the Key from that to make your system genuine.
    3) purchase an OEM System Builder of whichever edition of Win 7 you want, and install that - it will be a clean install, as it's not possible to do repair installs with OEM software. It's also not recommended, as the license becomes locked to the motherboard, and cannot be moved to another machine, and you also lose entitlement to MS Support.

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by cblakeney Saturday, April 23, 2011 3:19 PM
    Saturday, April 23, 2011 6:39 AM
    Moderator
  • All right, I'll pull the XP back off the media center system and just drop Unbuntu Linux on it then. However, I am going to be more leery of student promotions in the future, as Microsoft never indicated that what they were selling was an upgrade license key and not a full version anywhere on their website.
    Saturday, April 23, 2011 3:21 PM
  • It is with regret that I must disagree strongly with Noel and others who sometimes advise end users to acquire and use OEM system builder copies of Windows.  I realize that most users have never seen a system builder license.  It is not at all the same as the OEM end user license agreement (EULA).  The SB license is always removed before the customer receives the computer it is installed on. 

    Here is the pertinent part of the SB license.  It clearly does NOT grant the purchaser of an OEM pack any end user rights.  It restricts the purchaser of OEM software to installation on a computer sold to a third party (customer) and prohibits the purchaser from using the software himself.  SB packs are clearly NOT for end users.  I have highlighted salient points.

    MICROSOFT OEM SYSTEM BUILDER LICENSE 

    (Visit www.microsoft.com/oem for additional OEM System Builder information) 

    1 Definitions. 

    a. "Customer System" means a fully assembled computer system that includes a CPU, a motherboard, a power supply, an internally mounted NAND or revolving magnetic-based hard drive, and a case. 

    b. "Distribution" and "Distribute" mean the point in time when a Customer System leaves your control. 

    c. "Hardware" means the Microsoft hardware included in the Peck. A unit of Hardware includes any software and end user documentation that may be included in the Pack. 

    d. "OPK" means the OEM preinstallation kit provided by Microsoft that includes installation instructions, utilities and tools for preinstalIing the Software. 

    e. "Package" means this package of Microsoft Software or Hardware. 

    f. "Software" means the Microsoft software inside the Pack. A unit of  Software includes any software media, documentation, certificate of authenticity ("COA') label, end user license terms and security devices.  

    2. Authorized Distribution and Acceptance. To distribute the Software or Hardware in this Pack, you must be a System Builder and accept this license. 'System Builder' means an original equipment manufacturer, an assembler, a refurbisher, or a software pre-installer that sells the Customer System(s) to a third party. You accept this license when you open this Pack. If you choose not to accept this license, promptly return the unopened Pack to your distributor. You may only distribute unopened Packs within your territory. For the territory in which you may distribute, see www.mirosoft.com/oem/sblicense/territory. Individual Software or Hardware units may not be returned after the Pack is opened.

    3. Parties. Microsoft Licensing, GP ("MLGP"), a general partnership organized under the laws of the State of Nevada, grants this license to you. However, if you are located in Europe, the Middle East or Africa, then this license is granted by Microsoft Ireland Operations Limited ("MIOL"), a company organized under the laws of Ireland. The terms "we", "our", "us", or "Microsoft" mean MLGP or MIOL.

    4. Limited license. If you comply with the terms of this license, Microsoft grants you a limited license to distribute the Software or Hardware. Except as granted in this license, you may not use, run, copy, modify, display, distribute, repackage or reassemble the Software, Hardware, OPK or any part of them. You may not reverse engineer, decompile, or disassemble the Software, Hardware or OPK, except to the extent expressly permitted by this license or by applicable law notwithstanding this prohibition.  All rights not expressly granted are reserved.

    There is more but this is the pertinent part.

    The correct license for an end user purchasing Windows, including those building their own computers and doing favors for friends and relatives, is RETAIL.

     


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Saturday, April 23, 2011 3:49 PM
    Answerer
  • "Cbarnhorst" wrote in message news:ebff57f5-6792-4304-9e1f-e6cc0d1a6495...

    It is with regret that I must disagree strongly with Noel and others who sometimes advise end users to acquire and use OEM system builder copies of Windows.

    <snip>

     


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Thought you would <eg>.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Saturday, April 23, 2011 4:06 PM
    Moderator
  • Colin and I have actually talked about this a bit and his reasoning was compelling.

    Compelling enough that I went and looked up the OEM Licensing for myself. (Note the OEM Licensing and the OEM EULA are different. The former is for the person Making the PC, the later is for the person using the PC).  As you can see from Colin's post (the underlined section) When using OEM software, the Maker of the PC and the User of the PC must ALWAYS be different people.

     

    In other words, to qualify under the OEM Licensing, a PC using OEM software must be sold to a 3rd party.

     


    Darin MS
    Monday, April 25, 2011 9:47 PM
  • "Darin Smith MS" wrote in message news:4a2bfce9-dae5-4977-ba2f-7b3a0cb05f32...

    Colin and I have actually talked about this a bit and his reasoning was compelling.

    Compelling enough that I went and looked up the OEM Licensing for myself. (Note the OEM Licensing and the OEM EULA are different. The former is for the person Making the PC, the later is for the person using the PC).  As you can see from Colin's post (the underlined section) When using OEM software, the Maker of the PC and the User of the PC must ALWAYS be different people.

     

    In other words, to qualify under the OEM Licensing, a PC using OEM software must be sold to a 3rd party.

     


    Darin MS

    Having re-read it myself, finally, I have to agree. I haven't actually installed any new OEM machines since that version of the License came out (2008) so hadn't read the wording for quite a while.
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, April 25, 2011 11:23 PM
    Moderator