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What do I buy when I buy Project Server 2010? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I need some advice on what is involved with the rollout of PS2010.
    My environment is looking to use Sharepoint 2010. I was targeting Sharepoint 2010 Standard (maybe just WSS 4.0 because of a large amount of customizing) but I see I need Sharepoint 2010 Enterprise cals for Project Server.

    In Project Server 2003, the Server product established it's Web Servers on the WSS2.0 framework which was free. So the purchase was Project Server connecting to an existing SQL Server carrying a Processor licence, and Project Server Cals. I know the standard answer for these questions is contact your reseller but I have interpreted reseller discussions so incorrectly in that past that it has resulted in misinformation. I would be happy to hear a brief explaination from the implementors. Thank you.

    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 2:47 PM

Answers

  • Your analysis is correct. In 2007, you could buy Server CALs with the free
    WSS flavor of SharePoint, and that worked fine. In 2010, you will need Enterprise
    SharePoint CALs as well as PWA CALs and a couple of Microsoft Professional
    licenses - for all intents and purposes similar to a 2007 model deployed
    on MOSS (not WSS).
     
    There was and still may be an offer existing for clients who purchase the
    2007 Project Server with Software Assurance. Since many customers already
    had Project Server on WSS and did not want to pay for the upgrade to SharePoint
    2010 Enterprise, they could get free SharePoint 2010 CALs. If that deal
    is not dead, it will be soon.
     
    Hope that helps.
     
    - Andrew Lavinsky
    Blog: http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/epm
     
     
     
    • Marked as answer by Toomanyhats Thursday, May 20, 2010 3:51 PM
    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 3:33 PM

All replies

  • Your analysis is correct. In 2007, you could buy Server CALs with the free
    WSS flavor of SharePoint, and that worked fine. In 2010, you will need Enterprise
    SharePoint CALs as well as PWA CALs and a couple of Microsoft Professional
    licenses - for all intents and purposes similar to a 2007 model deployed
    on MOSS (not WSS).
     
    There was and still may be an offer existing for clients who purchase the
    2007 Project Server with Software Assurance. Since many customers already
    had Project Server on WSS and did not want to pay for the upgrade to SharePoint
    2010 Enterprise, they could get free SharePoint 2010 CALs. If that deal
    is not dead, it will be soon.
     
    Hope that helps.
     
    - Andrew Lavinsky
    Blog: http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/epm
     
     
     
    • Marked as answer by Toomanyhats Thursday, May 20, 2010 3:51 PM
    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 3:33 PM
  • Thank you very much.

    By the way I just checked your Blogs oil drilling scenerio.
    I've always used project in a fully levelled and infinite resource mode (hybrid) to handle daily plant operation.

    When training the users I explained to them that they are using a software that was designed to help plan "Building the oil refinery" but we have to trick it into Running 50 oil refineries". Can't wait to read the series.

    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 6:12 PM
  • So you're using MS Project to do maintenance scheduling? I've worked in
    one scenario like that. FWIW, I know the New Standards Institute does a
    lot of training around using MS Project as the front end to a CMMS like Maximo.
     
    - Andrew Lavinsky
    Blog: http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/epm
     
     
     
    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 6:51 PM
  • No not maintenance scheduling, custom manufacturing line of business / daily operations.

    Our CAD group for example.

    Each individual designer is loaded with 30 tasks. These tasks can come from any of 50 current projects. Usually a designer have assignments for 4 different projects. Their customer interaction cause us a huge amount of task switching. Design goes fast then waits, switches to another project, goes fast then waits. etc..

    They are always fully levelled. But obviously you can't open 50 projects at a time and hit the level button. So they all exist within what I call a "resource control panel". That project is assignment centric, it is rescheduled a few times a day and their updates are processed in a continuous stream. Their tasks are linked to ASAP milestones in each regular project. Thus when each project is opened it responds directly and uniquely to the changes made by the daily operational manager (design leader/scheduler).

    I read your oil well maintenance series and it was very good. I have never been able to overcome the limitations of the adhoc project however as an effective way to engage the levelling engine, the project count is too high in my case. I was hoping Project 2010 would have a server side scheduling engine that would allow portfolio scope levelling.

    Back to the oil industry, another way to look at it would be if you were the company that built 50 refineries simultaneously. How would you level the dumptrucks that are on each refinery site? I did it by using a single project that handles the dumptruck fleet and assigns them to tasks for multiple (50 refineries) projects. It has worked fairly well. But the users are now ready for a more effective solution, I however, have never seen one, although many tell me they exist.

    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 7:41 PM
  • So you're using MS Project to do maintenance scheduling? I've worked in
    one scenario like that. FWIW, I know the New Standards Institute does a
    lot of training around using MS Project as the front end to a CMMS like Maximo.
     
    - Andrew Lavinsky
    Blog: http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/epm
     
     
     
    Wednesday, May 19, 2010 4:52 PM