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Reorder Tuneup Tasks RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • I know the software development team may have chosen the tuneup order for some undisclosed reason, but it seems to me that it would perform better (and more logically) to reorder it. Either a hardcoded reorder in the following order (see below) or an option to allow the user to reorder the tasks.
    First, it seems to me that you would always want to backup, then defragment last. Defragmenting is the least security-oriented task in the list and it is probably the least necessary to maintain a working and up-to-date system. Secondly, I believe that the Windows Update and virus/spyware scans should come first, as they are obviously the most important tasks in the tuneup and if a user cancels the tuneup because it is taking too long, it would be best if they cancelled during the unnecessary file removal or defrag rather than the virus/spyware scan or update check. Third, why would you backup the system before the "high-priority" security updates from Microsoft are installed? Aside from the very unlikely chance that one of the updates severely disables your system, there is no reason to make a backup that will become obsolete within minutes of its completion. For these reasons, I am posting what I believe to be the most logical tuneup order, just in case someone on the OneCare development team happens to be reading:
    1. Remove unnecessary files
    2. Scan for viruses/spyware
    3. Check for high-priority updates
    4. Backup
    5. Defragment
    Saturday, August 4, 2007 4:25 AM

All replies

  • Thanks for the feedback.

    Do note that OneCare checks for missing updates, but doesn't install them before proceeding to backup. If any are missing, you will be told to visit Windows Update. Also, backup doesn't back up programs or operating system files, so the security updates are not applicable to the data that was backed up before the patches would be applied.

    However, your logic for the rest of the steps sounds good to me.

    -steve

     

    Sunday, August 5, 2007 1:51 AM
    Moderator
  • To be honest, I have always kept my system up-to-date myself before OneCare had an opportunity to alert me to missing updates. The arrangement of the tasks in the Tuneup window led me to believe the task of checking for updates and installing them was combined.
    As far as updates, I haven't had to restore one yet, so again I guess that's a lack of knowledge on my part for being unfamiliar with exactly what is being backed up.
    This came to mind as my system ran its weekly tuneup and I thought if anybody would be interested, this would be the place to post it.
    Sunday, August 5, 2007 4:19 AM
  • Just as a note, the reason that defragmentation is done before the other scanning tasks is simply performance. Since both the antivirus and backup scanning will perform scans of the filing system, these operations should perform faster and with less disk system overhead if the folders and files are better organized.

     

    Though you can make a good argument for different ordering, for most situations where the Tune-up is run overnight as planned in the original design, the current order would operate the most effectively with the least amount of time and drive wear.

     

    OneCareBear

    Sunday, August 5, 2007 5:38 AM
    Moderator
  • I have mine scheduled to run overnight, so I never really thought about time as an issue. I just thought if you defragment the drive, then you go through and remove any spyware apps during that scan, then there is already fragmentation on the drive. Of course, as soon as you start using the computer that's going to begin happening anyway.
    I understand the logic behind this order now. I definitely see that time-wise, having a defragmented drive would speed up the scan and backup, as well as reduce unnecessary head movement.
    Thanks for explaining.
    Sunday, August 5, 2007 3:31 PM
  •  xpxp2002 wrote:
    I know the software development team may have chosen the tuneup order for some undisclosed reason, but it seems to me that it would perform better (and more logically) to reorder it. Either a hardcoded reorder in the following order (see below) or an option to allow the user to reorder the tasks.
    First, it seems to me that you would always want to backup, then defragment last. Defragmenting is the least security-oriented task in the list and it is probably the least necessary to maintain a working and up-to-date system. Secondly, I believe that the Windows Update and virus/spyware scans should come first, as they are obviously the most important tasks in the tuneup and if a user cancels the tuneup because it is taking too long, it would be best if they cancelled during the unnecessary file removal or defrag rather than the virus/spyware scan or update check. Third, why would you backup the system before the "high-priority" security updates from Microsoft are installed? Aside from the very unlikely chance that one of the updates severely disables your system, there is no reason to make a backup that will become obsolete within minutes of its completion. For these reasons, I am posting what I believe to be the most logical tuneup order, just in case someone on the OneCare development team happens to be reading:
    1. Remove unnecessary files
    2. Scan for viruses/spyware
    3. Check for high-priority updates
    4. Backup
    5. Defragment

     

    I was thinking the same thing. The Tune-up order the way it is could cause issues because if there was a virus a defrag could cause it to spread before it was detected then it take several scans to clean up from it.

     

     

    Monday, August 6, 2007 10:04 PM
  •  Mikro wrote:

    I was thinking the same thing. The Tune-up order the way it is could cause issues because if there was a virus a defrag could cause it to spread before it was detected then it take several scans to clean up from it.

     

     

    No, because defragmentation simply moves blocks of data around the disk at a level below the normal filing system. It treats files as chunks of data, not operational items, so it simply moves them and then corrects the filing system indexes to let it know where they've been moved.

     

    Nothing in this process would allow malware to be replicated, since the original location the file occupied is no longer 'pointed' to by the filing system after the move is completed. These unused areas would be marked as 'free' and will be overwritten by the operating system when the space is needed.

     

    OneCareBear

    Tuesday, August 7, 2007 2:44 PM
    Moderator