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ECC RAM - Any significant advantage? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am looking at Supermicro boards for a new build and was wondering if ECC RAM support is an important feature for WHS.  From what I gather, ECC RAM will reduce or eliminate data corruption from RAM errors by self-correcting.  I thoroughly test any new RAM, so is this initial testing sufficient or does good RAM go bad?  With all the activity from DM, is WHS more exposed to RAM errors compared to RAID setups?  ECC is not cheap, but neither is data.
    Friday, November 21, 2008 1:57 PM

Answers

  • Short answer: No.
    ECC is often troublesome , when it comes to compatibility. You pay a lot more than for non ECC memory.  Boot cycle takes longer. A very low amount of WHS machines seems to be hit by faulty memory, so your chance is not that big to see potential benefits.
    Lets say, a home server is still a home server and usually not that mission critical as an Enterprise system (although people seem to see this different).
    There are a lot of better chances to invest your money than ECC RAM. (Only my personal opinion.)
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Friday, November 21, 2008 3:16 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Short answer: No.
    ECC is often troublesome , when it comes to compatibility. You pay a lot more than for non ECC memory.  Boot cycle takes longer. A very low amount of WHS machines seems to be hit by faulty memory, so your chance is not that big to see potential benefits.
    Lets say, a home server is still a home server and usually not that mission critical as an Enterprise system (although people seem to see this different).
    There are a lot of better chances to invest your money than ECC RAM. (Only my personal opinion.)
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf

    Friday, November 21, 2008 3:16 PM
    Moderator
  • "Any significant advantage" How about reliability? I work in a data center racks and racks of servers. Every single one has ECC RAM. ECC gives the computer a chance to correct errors not just detect them. One extra bit per byte is added, so the memory should not be that much more.
    Given the chance of ECC, take it.
    Thursday, November 27, 2008 3:05 AM
  • After reading this article on RAM-gone-bad (link below) , I decided to bump this thread.  I've had to remove corrupt files from my shares to eliminate file conflicts and I am left scratching my head as to what caused the conflict.  I've seen posts accusing the hard drive of malevolence in many of these cases.  However, non-ECC RAM may be a more likely culprit if this study by Google has any merit, and I'm going to agree with Massachusetts Bill on this one.

     
    CNET Article: http://news.cnet.com/8301-30685_3-10370026-264.html
    Study: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~bianca/papers/sigmetrics09.pdf
    Saturday, October 10, 2009 9:40 PM