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Royal Hosing over With Windows Live ID RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • I signed up with a new Windows live so I could claim @live.com No one said WLOC wasn't transferable only after the fact I'm told.

     

    Also I kicked myself off Microsoft Connects no more beta feedback for me I can start a new subscription but all the active stuff for beta and other keys & my paid keys are at my old Windows Live ID

     

    I'm afraid if I uninstall and reinstall and reactivate I'll lose my paid key and the betas right now the software still looking at my old Windows live ID.

     

    I think some one wasn't thinking when they released this new windows live stuff

     

    There should of been easier Migration tools from msn to windows live domain accounts.

     

    from what I read wloc subscriptions are set like xbox live accounts there Unique to the Windows live ID and there not transferable. this stinks. now I'm stuck with 2 accounts.

    Saturday, November 10, 2007 6:41 AM

All replies

  • You've made a common mistake of assuming that there's something special about an '@live.com' account. You actually already have a Windows Live account if you have either an MSN Hotmail (including @msn.com), MSN Messenger, or Microsoft Passport account no matter what your email address is.

    http://get.live.com/getlive/overview

     

    The original Passport system, which was evolved into the Windows Live ID system was unlinked from the MSN account system several years ago, so the actual account name has no real meaning any more.

     

    What this means is what you've discovered, that creating an '@live.com' account is actually creating an entirely new and separate account. Most users would be best off creating a Live ID using their current email address, since remembering and maintianing another account is simply confusing. However, if they don't already have an email account or would prefer one they can keep when moving between different ISPs, a Hotmail account might make sense.

     

    This is probably the biggest single source of user confusion related to the OneCare activation process, since your Windows Live account continues to exist even if you dump the email account it was originally created to mimic. Since the Windows Live (billing) account itself really has nothing to do with the email account, regardless of the fact that the accounts are syncronized if they are Hotmail/MSN accounts, it can continue to support your Windows Live purchases long after you switch email accounts. Though this is really a plus, it's utterly confusing to a non-technical user, since they can't conprehend the difference between two accounts with the same naming even when they're being used at entirely different sites.

     

    OneCareBear

    Sunday, November 11, 2007 5:39 AM
    Moderator
  •  OneCareBear wrote:

    You've made a common mistake of assuming that there's something special about an '@live.com' account. You actually already have a Windows Live account if you have either an MSN Hotmail (including @msn.com), MSN Messenger, or Microsoft Passport account no matter what your email address is.

    http://get.live.com/getlive/overview

     

    The original Passport system, which was evolved into the Windows Live ID system was unlinked from the MSN account system several years ago, so the actual account name has no real meaning any more.

     

    What this means is what you've discovered, that creating an '@live.com' account is actually creating an entirely new and separate account. Most users would be best off creating a Live ID using their current email address, since remembering and maintianing another account is simply confusing. However, if they don't already have an email account or would prefer one they can keep when moving between different ISPs, a Hotmail account might make sense.

     

    This is probably the biggest single source of user confusion related to the OneCare activation process, since your Windows Live account continues to exist even if you dump the email account it was originally created to mimic. Since the Windows Live (billing) account itself really has nothing to do with the email account, regardless of the fact that the accounts are syncronized if they are Hotmail/MSN accounts, it can continue to support your Windows Live purchases long after you switch email accounts. Though this is really a plus, it's utterly confusing to a non-technical user, since they can't conprehend the difference between two accounts with the same naming even when they're being used at entirely different sites.

     

    OneCareBear

     

    With the new Migration tools to change Windows Live IDs in xbox live and xbox 360 fall update My mission to close a messed up fragged 7yr @msn.com with cancel this or that and upgraded as msn updated through the years mess.

    My new new @Live ID is clean mean signed in No issues account that xbox tool even Migrated One Care over seems all the smart guys at Microsoft are over at Xbox. Where Windows Live One Care 2.0 in My Opinion is a temporary flop till the now known took 2 weeks to long to Identfy Issues will be resolved soon. I think Windows Live dev better hire some of those xbox guys they seem to know what there doing when it comes to programing.

    Thursday, December 6, 2007 5:40 AM
  • Actually it's simpler than this Mikro, the general purpose PC is dead. If you look at what you have done by buying an XBOX, if it would only do email and browse the web, what do you need a PC for?

     

    In fact, I just got a phone that does email and web, so I'm using my PC less than ever. I'll probably still get a Vista PC to do some mutimedia, but that's more hobby/entertainment than necessity.

     

    The average home user could probably get by with either a PDA like phone for email or something like a game console if they could browse the web. A PC or even a MAC is overkill for most typical home users, which is why they consistently get in trouble using them on the web. For these users the more limited the device the better, since there's less to learn and screw up. This is exactly what the XBOX does, limits the user to games and very little else, so it's harder to get confused and easier to protect. Why do you think Microsoft got into this market in such a big way?

     

    The next couple years will be telling, since many are due to replace their several year old PC bought around 2000-2001. It will be interesting to see how many still see a need for a PC vs the generally smaller, more mobile and simple to use devices that already exist or will soon be available. Business has already moved to some of these devices and laptops, but they usually need the Office and other applications that aren't so important to a home only user.

     

    OneCareBear

    Thursday, December 6, 2007 6:05 AM
    Moderator