locked
Windows Home Server and Large Raid 6 Array RRS feed

  • Question

  • Here is my situation.

    Right now my server has 13TB of useable space.

    I have all of the files and folders on my server duplicated, save for one of the shares: videos.

    This videos folder has 10TB of files, and is obviously not able to be duplicated with my current hardware.

    My solution was going to be to move my WHS to a new machine consisting of 20 1.5TB drives in a large RAID 6 array. This way I can have redundancy for everything given normal failures, including my videos. 

    I Read about the lack of GPT support so that WHS cannot support this configuration. I was going to make a single drive that the OS would be installed to, so that I would not have to have the files move between a single OS drive to the main array. Now that I know WHS does not support this kind of size, I am being forced to consider alternatives to WHS.

    As far as I can tell there are no ways to have WHS work in this situation, maybe someone can share some enlightening information, or possibly suggest another route to go about this.

    Thank You
    Friday, July 31, 2009 2:25 PM

Answers

  • Windows Home Server won't format a drive using GPT, no. The supported option is going to be to let Windows Home Server control the drives, rather than putting them into a large RAID array. A second (unsupported, because RAID isn't a supported hardware configuration) option will be to create a number of volumes on the array. Normally these will be presented to the operating system as individual disks. You could create 14 x 2 TB volumes, give them to Windows Home Server as individual disks, and turn off share duplication (since you already have redundancy from your RAID array).
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by elbweb Friday, July 31, 2009 6:13 PM
    Friday, July 31, 2009 4:39 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Windows Home Server won't format a drive using GPT, no. The supported option is going to be to let Windows Home Server control the drives, rather than putting them into a large RAID array. A second (unsupported, because RAID isn't a supported hardware configuration) option will be to create a number of volumes on the array. Normally these will be presented to the operating system as individual disks. You could create 14 x 2 TB volumes, give them to Windows Home Server as individual disks, and turn off share duplication (since you already have redundancy from your RAID array).
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by elbweb Friday, July 31, 2009 6:13 PM
    Friday, July 31, 2009 4:39 PM
    Moderator
  • So basically create a large single array in RAID and then partition it into the 2TB limit that WHS has? so that WHS would treat them as separate disks?

    I was wondering if this would work. I would lose performance over a single partition (since WHS will be moving all my data around, even though they are stored on the same physical disk, unbeknownst to WHS). But it still seems like a much better option then getting rid of my home server!

    I have another question about the installation, but will post that into a new thread.
    Friday, July 31, 2009 6:01 PM
  • Ken,

    Maybe you can help me with this.

    I have my WHS machine setup, with a 13.5TB drive (11x1.5tb raid 6 array) and I am now trying to do what we talked about before.

    I can't seem to create the volumes as we need, and I can't find anything to help me with it. I can only create more then 2TB worth of volumes in the disk management system if I change it to a GPT drive, but I was under the impression that the GPT/MFS was per volume, not drive.

    Maybe this is just a lmitation of the Windows Disk Management? Any help would be appriciated.
    Wednesday, September 23, 2009 3:16 AM
  • My "help" is going to be limited to what I've said above, with repetition of the advice to break the array and let Windows Home Server manage your disks.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, September 23, 2009 7:06 PM
    Moderator