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Quantum Computer To Launch Next Week? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Quantum computers to Launch next week? Is that True?

    Tuesday, February 13, 2007 11:23 AM

Answers

  • I got some info about it.....

     

     

     

    B.C. firm to show off quantum computer

    Last Updated: Friday, February 9, 2007 | 10:30 AM PT

    A Vancouver-area company is set to publicly demonstrate its new quantum computer next week in what may be the first time the paradigm-shifting technology leaves the research laboratory.

    D-Wave Systems Inc. of Burnaby, B.C. plans to show off its commercial quantum computers at the Computer History Museum on Feb. 13 and at the Telus World of Science museum in Vancouver on Feb. 15.

    Quantum technology could revolutionize the computer industry by allowing systems to simultaneously perform multiple calculations where traditional computers would have to perform them one at a time.

    Such a system would be governed by the rules of quantum physics, as opposed to physics laws such as mechanics, gravity and Einstein's theory of relativity. Quantum mechanics rule particle interactions below the atomic scale, where the conventional laws of physics break down.

    The fundamental element of a traditional computer is a bit, which, like a switch, can only be in the on or off state at any given moment, or hold a value of either one or zero.

    In contrast, the fundamental element of quantum computing, the quantum bit or "qubit," can exist in multiple states at the same time so every qubit is simultaneously on and off with a value of one and zero.

    Tuesday, February 13, 2007 12:09 PM

All replies

  • I got some info about it.....

     

     

     

    B.C. firm to show off quantum computer

    Last Updated: Friday, February 9, 2007 | 10:30 AM PT

    A Vancouver-area company is set to publicly demonstrate its new quantum computer next week in what may be the first time the paradigm-shifting technology leaves the research laboratory.

    D-Wave Systems Inc. of Burnaby, B.C. plans to show off its commercial quantum computers at the Computer History Museum on Feb. 13 and at the Telus World of Science museum in Vancouver on Feb. 15.

    Quantum technology could revolutionize the computer industry by allowing systems to simultaneously perform multiple calculations where traditional computers would have to perform them one at a time.

    Such a system would be governed by the rules of quantum physics, as opposed to physics laws such as mechanics, gravity and Einstein's theory of relativity. Quantum mechanics rule particle interactions below the atomic scale, where the conventional laws of physics break down.

    The fundamental element of a traditional computer is a bit, which, like a switch, can only be in the on or off state at any given moment, or hold a value of either one or zero.

    In contrast, the fundamental element of quantum computing, the quantum bit or "qubit," can exist in multiple states at the same time so every qubit is simultaneously on and off with a value of one and zero.

    Tuesday, February 13, 2007 12:09 PM
  • D-Wave Systems of British Columbia is all set to demonstrate a 16-qubit quantum computer. Simple devices have been built in the lab before, and this is still a prototype, but it is a commercial project that aims to get quantum devices into computer rooms, solving tricky problems such as financial optimization. Most quantum computers have to be isolated from the outside world (look at them and they stop working). This one is an 'adiabatic' quantum computer — which means (in theory, says D-Wave) that it can live with thermal noise and give results without having to be isolated. There's a description of it here.

    Here are some pictures http://dwave.wordpress.com/2007/01/

    Thanks & Regards,
    Prathul Prabhakar
    Microsoft Student Partner
    http://student-partners.com/members/prathul.aspx
    http://xplore.wordpress.com

    Tuesday, February 13, 2007 12:12 PM
  • no idea......
    Tuesday, February 13, 2007 8:52 PM
  • wot is quantum computing? is it different from our regular pentiumised computing??
    Wednesday, February 14, 2007 4:01 PM