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Normalization rules for outbound calls RRS feed

  • Question

  • Can someone please explain how to use normalization rules for outbound calls?  I've read the OCS Enterprise Voice Guide a few times and I guess I still don't get it.

     

    Here is what I've observed:

     

    (1) If I don't have any normalization rules, then when I enter a 5 digit number in the MOC and make the call, the call is rejected and the OCS log shows "404 No matching rule has been found in the dial plan for the called number".

     

    (2) If I have a normalization rule that matches any 5 digit number, and does not modify the number, i.e., matching pattern is ^(\d{5})$ and translated pattern is $1, then when I enter a 5 digit number in the MOC, the MOC returns "No results found." and I cannot make the call.

     

    (3) If I have a normalization rule that matches any 5 digit number, and translates it to E.164, i.e., matching pattern is ^(\d{5})$ and translated pattern is +122233$1, then when I enter a 5 digit number in the MOC, the MOC translates to the E.164 format and I'm able to dial - the call cannot be completed because I don't yet have a PBX hooked up (I'm trying to get calls between MOC and PBXs to work), but at least I can see the call be routed to the mediation server.

     

    My questions are:

    - In (1), if "matching rule" does not mean normalization rule, then what is OCS referring to?

    - In (2), why does the MOC not allow me to dial?

    - In (3), this looks like it will work (I'll know more when I have the PBX hooked up), but translating a 5 digit number to E.164 and then back down to 5 digits at the PBX seems like overkill.  Is there another way of sending out just the original dialed number instead of E.164?

     

    Thanks in advance.

    Monday, July 23, 2007 2:11 PM

Answers

  • It sounds like you do get it, but just need some confirmation.

    1. Matching rule means normalization rule.

    2. The number is not matched with any users' configured numbers in the users' comminication properties.

    3.This is the setup you will need. The normalization rules will need to anticipate the numbers dialed by users and then convert them to E.164.

    For example, a caller working in Seattle, Washington, might dial any one of the following numbers:

    9-1-206-555-1212

    9-206-555-1212

    9-555-1212

    1212

     

    The normalization rules will convert all of these to +12065551212 and then check this number against AD, the users' configured communications properties telephone number. If it doesn't match, it will send the number to the mediation server which will then forward it to the sip to pstn gateway. The gateway will be expecting the E.164 format. The call will then be connected.

    Once you have configuredyour rules, policies, usages, routes, etc start the Route Helper tool to confirm your setup.

    Does that answer your questions?

    Wednesday, August 1, 2007 10:59 PM

All replies

  • It sounds like you do get it, but just need some confirmation.

    1. Matching rule means normalization rule.

    2. The number is not matched with any users' configured numbers in the users' comminication properties.

    3.This is the setup you will need. The normalization rules will need to anticipate the numbers dialed by users and then convert them to E.164.

    For example, a caller working in Seattle, Washington, might dial any one of the following numbers:

    9-1-206-555-1212

    9-206-555-1212

    9-555-1212

    1212

     

    The normalization rules will convert all of these to +12065551212 and then check this number against AD, the users' configured communications properties telephone number. If it doesn't match, it will send the number to the mediation server which will then forward it to the sip to pstn gateway. The gateway will be expecting the E.164 format. The call will then be connected.

    Once you have configuredyour rules, policies, usages, routes, etc start the Route Helper tool to confirm your setup.

    Does that answer your questions?

    Wednesday, August 1, 2007 10:59 PM
  • Hi,

     

    Internally we are using 4 digits and I use this as my normalization rule and the PBX understands these digits (d\d\d\d). I however highly recommend to decide and move towards the E.164 standard as this will save u lots of pain.

     

    Regards

    Anesh

    Thursday, August 2, 2007 3:12 PM
  • For (2), I'm still somewhat confused.  Remember I'm dialing a 5-digit PBX number, not a communicator user, so I don't expect to match any communicator users' configured number.  But failing to find a match, shouldn't the OCS then route to the mediation server?

     

    For (3), I understand the need to convert to E.164 for routing to a PSTN gateway.  But when routing to a PBX, is it necessary to send E.164?  It would seem easier to send the dialed number in the original form than to undo the E.164 conversion at the PBX. 

     

    By the way, I do finally have it working using these E.164 rules, I just wanted to know if there was a simpler way.

     

    Friday, August 3, 2007 9:26 PM