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Kind of lame that OneCare 2 won't support XP x64, don't you think? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I mean, it's YOUR OWN OPERATING SYSTEM for $#^%'s sake.
    Tuesday, August 14, 2007 10:11 PM

Answers

  • Why should Microsoft re-engineer OneCare for an older OS that is used by a small population of customers? Yes, those using X64 of XP are quite happy with it, but I don't think (my opinion) that it warrants the efforts to re-write OneCare for that OS.

    -steve

     

    Wednesday, August 15, 2007 12:39 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Why should Microsoft re-engineer OneCare for an older OS that is used by a small population of customers? Yes, those using X64 of XP are quite happy with it, but I don't think (my opinion) that it warrants the efforts to re-write OneCare for that OS.

    -steve

     

    Wednesday, August 15, 2007 12:39 AM
    Moderator
  • Adding to Steve's comments, OneCare is tergeted at the basic Home user. This type of user is generally non-technical and so has little interest in things like an x64 OS, so it seems unlikely that many users of OneCare would have both.

     

    However, what's happening lately is that some PC vendors have begun to include the x64 versions of Vista with their x64 capable hardware, meaning that significnat numbers of users are acquiring the x64 version of Vista without even asking for it. This meant that x64 support for that OS had become more important, since it is the future of the Windows OS family.

     

    Windows XP x64 is now legacy, as is the Windows XP OS itself, so I'd suspect it would only be supported if there were some 'extra time' available to work on it. With the fact that almost no one would now acquire the x64 XP version with the Vista versions available, the numbers are only likely to get smaller, so the priority will obviously be less for this to occur.

     

    OneCareBear

    Wednesday, August 15, 2007 8:51 PM
    Moderator
  • Also, just to insure understanding for everyone; even though OneCare Beta 2 does not support

    XP 64bit, it does support Vista 64bit.

     

    Thursday, August 23, 2007 4:04 AM
  • I agree it is lame. I saved hard as a disability pensioner to buy XP 64bit I am a bit of a pc fan and thought since it was the latest operating system from microsoft it would be supported for a long time. And if you design and sell a product to people you should NOT be able to just say "Oh well we did not sell many so why the need for support " We deserve support just as much as people that have just purchased Vista. A big company like Microsoft should look after it's customers and help them if they sold them a product that did not sell so well.

    They could offer those who wanted it a large discount on a Vista x64 version of XP Pro x64.

    I for one would welcome it as I would love to use Vista but cannot as I brought my XP version not that long ago and on my pension cannot afford the price Vista x64 is now selling for.

     

    Microsoft I think your neglecting your responcebilties   " TWOROCKSRIK "

    Thursday, August 23, 2007 3:06 PM
  • XP 64 is still supported by Microsoft and is a good choice if you like the OS for your usage. However, OneCare will not be available for it. You can get protection from any number of 3rd party vendors. I believe that Avast is available for XP64 and it is free for home users. www.avast.com

     

    -steve

     

    Thursday, August 23, 2007 3:10 PM
    Moderator
  • Ok if you want to be known for letting your own responcebilities fall on other company's willing to help those microsoft is not willing to help or support. I call it bad public relations. I for one would not build a car and after not selling many say to the customers "We are no longer making parts as we did not sell many. Now go to some other car company and get them to help you."

    Thursday, August 23, 2007 3:17 PM
  • Just to clarify, the moderators of the forum, myself included, don't work for Microsoft. We're volunteers who use the program and, for some crazy reason, like to help people when we can.

    If you read my other post in this thread, you've seen my speculation why Microsoft would not put resources into writing a version of OneCare for XP64. It is an older OS and it is a niche OS. Thankfully, OneCare 2.0 was written to work on Vista x64 as well as the 32 bit version and XP 32 bit. The vast majority of Windows users are on XP 32 bit, with more and more Vista 32 bit daily. Vista x64 is gaining in popularity, but it is not "mainstream" - yet. One day we will all be running 64 bit operating systems and will see 32 bit operating systems as the old days of DOS. I think it was a smart decision to develop OneCare for Vista x64 now .

    -steve

     

    Thursday, August 23, 2007 4:15 PM
    Moderator
  • A small population of customers?

     

    I purchased a Dell [laptop] INSPIRON E1505 [about 8 months] before Vista was released - OS is Windows XP.  Will OneCare support and protect my laptop.  A friend of mine was unable to successfully install & load Vista on her laptop because the OS was XP

     

    Friday, August 24, 2007 3:36 PM
  • One care will support and protect your Windows XP laptop. For your friend who was unable to install Vista, she should use the Vista upgrade advisor - http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/buyorupgrade/upgradeadvisor.mspx and if the computer is Vista capable and she still can't install Vista she might find help here - http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups/en-us/default.mspx?dg=microsoft.public.windows.vista.installation_setup&lang=en&cr=US&r=fc1b61c0-9919-4c89-b6d4-80a07ffad2e2

     

    Friday, August 24, 2007 3:56 PM
    Moderator
  • I also find it very unprofessional to release an OS that had little to no support...or at least little desire to offer it.  Avast is the only antivirus software I could get to work, but I doubt it's as good as Microsoft's own anti-virus.  I've always owned PC's with Windows OS, but if Microsoft actually just ignores the XP 64-bit users on this issue, my next computer will be a Macintosh...but I hope it doesn't come to that!  I don't care how small the minority of owners are...they built it, sold it, and should support it.  Otherwise, that kind of business practice will cause me not to trust them in the future.  Because who's to say the next time I shell out $4k for another computer, they won't just do this again.

     

    On a side note, I went ahead and started the online OneCare Safety Scanner before I found out 64-bit XP isn't compatible, and it seems to be running ok so far??

     

    Wednesday, September 5, 2007 12:16 PM
  • steve_r_elliott,

     

    Apparently you are confused about the operating system you've purchased and the support that's been provided. This is why as I've stated in the past, most users aren't ready for a 64-bit OS, any more than many of the software vendors.

     

    The reason the Safety Scanner works is that it isn't really the same as the full version of OneCare that runs locally on your PC. Instead of running as Services which must be written for the 32 or 64 bit OS version they will support, it simply runs as an executable application, which isn't as sensitive to these things. Also, last I knew an entirely different group was suppporting the Safety Scanner, it was simply named OneCare for marketing consistency. There is also a version of the Windows Defender Antispyware application which I believe supports the Windows XP 64-bit platform and it's even free.

     

    Though the Windows XP 64-bit version has been available for a couple years, it was primarily a test bed for the future of 64-bit computing. It had some real application for those with truly extreme needs for processing power like advanced CAD or other computation intensive applications. However, it really wasn't built for the general user market, mostly for specialty business and research needs.

     

    Since Windows Live OneCare was specifically developed for the home user market, especially as a foolproof protection for those with little knowledge or interest in maintaining their PC, the 64-bit version of Windows XP really didn't fit this market. In fact, the only real reason the new Vista 64-bit versions are being supported this early is that some vendors are now shipping all of their new 64-bit systems with a Vista 64-bit OS, requested or not, so these same home users are ending up with something they didn't request or even understand. Since Vista 64-bit will be the future of Windows computing anyway, supporting it makes sense.

     

    If you're wondering where all of this is explained clearly, I don't really know what to tell you. Like server operating systems and other business or technically oriented OS products from Microsoft, such things aren't often explained in terms the everyday home user can understand. For this reason, it's really up to the user to research the situation themselves, which can lead to situations like yours.

     

    Personally, if I really wanted a 64-bit platform with support, I'd upgrade to an appropriate version of Vista. Windows XP support for all versions is already in its extended phase, which means that no new development by Microsoft will occur. This has been a clear statement of the Windows LifeCycle Support policy for at least two years, if not longer. Unfortunately, many home users have no understanding or knowledge of these policies, even though Microsoft has attempted to make them clear both online and through press releases to the media.

     

    OneCareBear
    Wednesday, September 5, 2007 2:36 PM
    Moderator
  •  

    Thanks for the reply OneCareBear.  Your post did help a little, in that I didn't realize OneCare was meant primarily for the "general user".  I assumed it was for all windows users...with the goal of producing an antivirus program that was better than its competitors, for all windows customers.

     

    I am a web designer, and often use programs that are pretty intense (like 3D programs, and video programs), so that is probably why the 64-bit system was recommended to me.  It does work much better than my previous 32-bit computer did...but I'm also running dual processors on this one.  I just feel like I may be more vunerable to viruses, since Microsoft doesn't offer an anti-virus program that is compatible, and last I checked, neither did Norton or McAfee.  One of the two actually had a 64-bit version, but said I'd have to purchase 10 licenses to get it!

     

    Since I don't know much about operating systems, I'll go ahead and ask this here.  Do most viruses need to be designed for a 64-bit system, or can my 64-bit system still pick up the same viruses as 32-bit systems?

     

    I'll look more into the Vista 64-bit option, but will have to weigh the positives and negatives, and see how compatible my software is with it.  All my Adobe, Flash, and 3D programs seem picky about the OS.

    Wednesday, September 5, 2007 4:20 PM
  •  

    Also, I am using Windows Defender.  It keeps dissapearing on me though...so I have to redownload it everytime I use it.  I just redownloaded it today, so hopefully it will stay this time.
    Wednesday, September 5, 2007 4:45 PM
  • I believe you can get a version of Avast to work on XP64 - www.avast.com

    Some 32 bit malware can attack your system, but they won't be able to infect the OS in the way a 32 bit version can, so your risk is minimized.

    -steve

    Wednesday, September 5, 2007 11:34 PM
    Moderator
  •  steve_r_elliott wrote:

     

    Also, I am using Windows Defender.  It keeps dissapearing on me though...so I have to redownload it everytime I use it.  I just redownloaded it today, so hopefully it will stay this time.

     

    Having no experience with XP64 and Defender, I'll refer you to the Defender newsgroups - 

    http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/spyware/software/newsgroups/default.mspx

     

    -steve

    Wednesday, September 5, 2007 11:35 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks.  Avast is what I've been using.  I just got worried yesterday about a potential threat after visiting a site that was on an infected server...so I was looking into more options and that led me to here.  Avast did alert me, but I was worried something may have gotten through.  I scanned with Avast, the OneCare online scanner, Registry Mechanic, Windows Defender x64, and Lavasoft Ad-Aware, so I think I'm in pretty decent shape now.  Those words "minimized risk" are also music to my ears
    Thursday, September 6, 2007 4:39 AM