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Hard Drive Sizing RRS feed

  • Question

  • Any advice very much appreciated, as always!

     

    Right, i have setup all the parts of WHS and have been very pleased with  the directions its going and its functionality.  I can defintly see a place for it in my IT setup at home, particularly for the ever increasing films collection i have on HD.

     

    That brings me to the next issue, I am rapidly running out of space.  What started as a test system (180gig, 80 gig) has rapidly become full.  I want to keep back ups of my main pc (200gig max) and i want to move all my films (320 gig currently) Clearly i need more space.

     

    Planning for expansion and reading the articules about making the primary HD the biggest, my question is:

     

    1.  Can i just add a 500 gig HD to my exisitng system, with a view to adding more 500 gig drives as i fill them?  or

    2.  Do i need to re-install WHS onto the new 500 gig drive and use the others as second and third?

    3.  Does only using 1 5oo gig to start with (and the other drives) mean i am not getting best backup of data within WHS to protect against data loss?

    4.  Should i consider fitting more 500gig drives at WHS re-install, if i have to re-install?

     

    Clealy the best thing would be for me to be able to just add a 500gig to my current setup, havign finally got it running right, but i notice that everyone seems to reccomend using the biggest drive as the primary.  Does this follow for the future (ie if much later on I got a 750gig i would have to re-install making that the first ?

     

    Thanks for any thoughts, i want to get the WHS running smoothly and then get on with pushing its use.

    Thursday, April 5, 2007 8:49 AM

Answers

  • The recommendation to use your largest drive as the system drive is because of limitations in Drive Extender, the technology that manages the storage pool. The free space on the primary data partition (D: ) is the limit to how much data you can copy to WHS in one shot. So if you have only an 80 GB drive as your system drive, you will have slightly less than 70 GB of space. A copy of more than that at one time will fail. Backups can easily be larger than the available space, and (because DE uses a lazy move strategy to get the files off of the primary data partition) just copying a lot of files to WHS at once, even in several shots, could eventually cause the drive to temporarily become full.

    There is a point at which there's no longer any need to worry about system drive size. I would guess for most users that point is around 200 GB, but I have no real evidence beyond my own experience.

    Some of these limitations are supposed to be removed in the shipping version of WHS, but I haven't seen anything to indicate if any (or which) limitations will remain.
    Thursday, April 5, 2007 11:35 AM
    Moderator
  • 1) Yeap!

    2) No, aside from the possibility of encountering the problem Ken mentioned.

    3) Possibly. If your largest drive is greater than the combined size of all other drives you are  going to be limited with respect to how much of your data can be replicated. E.g. With drive sizes of 500 & 100GB then you have a total of 600GB for storage, but only 100GB can be replicated on multiple drives to protect against disk failure.

    Of course, not all of your data needs to be replicated. For instance my ripped movies aren't. If a disk fails and they're lost then it'd be a pain to have to re-rip them, but that's nowhere near as awful as it would be to lose all my photos or documents.

    4) I would add disks as you need them.

    I'd recommend that you add another 500GB drive and see how things go.

    A.


    Thursday, April 5, 2007 1:02 PM

All replies

  • The recommendation to use your largest drive as the system drive is because of limitations in Drive Extender, the technology that manages the storage pool. The free space on the primary data partition (D: ) is the limit to how much data you can copy to WHS in one shot. So if you have only an 80 GB drive as your system drive, you will have slightly less than 70 GB of space. A copy of more than that at one time will fail. Backups can easily be larger than the available space, and (because DE uses a lazy move strategy to get the files off of the primary data partition) just copying a lot of files to WHS at once, even in several shots, could eventually cause the drive to temporarily become full.

    There is a point at which there's no longer any need to worry about system drive size. I would guess for most users that point is around 200 GB, but I have no real evidence beyond my own experience.

    Some of these limitations are supposed to be removed in the shipping version of WHS, but I haven't seen anything to indicate if any (or which) limitations will remain.
    Thursday, April 5, 2007 11:35 AM
    Moderator
  • 1) Yeap!

    2) No, aside from the possibility of encountering the problem Ken mentioned.

    3) Possibly. If your largest drive is greater than the combined size of all other drives you are  going to be limited with respect to how much of your data can be replicated. E.g. With drive sizes of 500 & 100GB then you have a total of 600GB for storage, but only 100GB can be replicated on multiple drives to protect against disk failure.

    Of course, not all of your data needs to be replicated. For instance my ripped movies aren't. If a disk fails and they're lost then it'd be a pain to have to re-rip them, but that's nowhere near as awful as it would be to lose all my photos or documents.

    4) I would add disks as you need them.

    I'd recommend that you add another 500GB drive and see how things go.

    A.


    Thursday, April 5, 2007 1:02 PM
  • thanks guys, i will go with your advice and add a 500 to what i have and see what happens, its a beta test after all! If i have to re-install i will if i encounter any real problems.

     

    Now got to move over to router and home hub setup, lets hope thats easy enough!

     

    thanks again

    Thursday, April 5, 2007 2:57 PM
  • Did you test this? What was the result? I setup my system with an 80 GB and 500 GB drive. With the 80 as the system. This left me w/ about 60 GB on that drive and it looks like I am limited to 126 GB of data. Leaving most of the 500 GB unused.

     

    Is there a way to get that space used (e.g. for backups) without having to raid the disk? Obviously if I am backing up my remote machines, I really don't need that section of disk raided, as I think that is overkill.

     

    Or do I just need to reinstall and select the 500 GB as the system disk?

     

    Addtionally, I have a netgear SC101 which I plan to add to the system. Will providing a 3rd disk (of 500 GB in size in this case) overcome that limitation or will the smallest disk always be the limiting factor?

     

    Regards,

    Stephen

    Tuesday, August 14, 2007 12:57 PM
  •  SBobcat wrote:

    I setup my system with an 80 GB and 500 GB drive. With the 80 as the system. This left me w/ about 60 GB on that drive and it looks like I am limited to 126 GB of data. Leaving most of the 500 GB unused.

     

    You should be limited to moving approx 60 GB of data to the "landing zone" (D partition on primary drive) on the server at one time.  However, once there, it should move (albeit slowly sometimes) the data to your 500 GB, thereby clearing your "landing zone" and allowing you to again move 60 GB of data.  Your console should show your total server space as approx. 540 GB.  You may not have given Disk Extender enough time to migrate your data from your primary drive to your secondary drive.

     

     SBobcat wrote:

    Is there a way to get that space used (e.g. for backups) without having to raid the disk? Obviously if I am backing up my remote machines, I really don't need that section of disk raided, as I think that is overkill.

     

    RAID is not supported on WHS (and really isn't necessary anyway).

     

     SBobcat wrote:

    Or do I just need to reinstall and select the 500 GB as the system disk?

     

    Yes, I would recommend moving your 500 GB drive to your primary drive. (Good time to do it now before RTM comes out.)

     

     SBobcat wrote:

    Addtionally, I have a netgear SC101 which I plan to add to the system. Will providing a 3rd disk (of 500 GB in size in this case) overcome that limitation or will the smallest disk always be the limiting factor?

     

    If you referring to the 60 GB transfer-at-once limitation, no.  The only way to change that is to increase the capacity of your primary drive.

     

    Tuesday, August 14, 2007 11:56 PM
    Moderator