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I feel like the adware issue is a dead end street. RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am a beta tester for the latest 2.x.x, i am in currently testing both versions, so i have posted somewhere like 2 diffrent bug reports about onecare conflicting with Adware and showing the red circle of health, but now with ADWARE 2008 the onecare circle goes to yellow instead of red. Frankly i am tired of hearing Microsoft blame Lavasoft for changing the way they program, as well as some MVPs saying ONECARE is a all in one solution, but if it was why doesn't it delete cookies, its predecessor did "WINDOWS ANTISPYWARE BETA" . Furthermore i have seen posts from MVPS saying IE's delete cookie option deletes all cookies, and frankly that isn't the case, as i have run ad aware right after using CCLEANER  which does delete cookies, and there are still cookies and MRU's hanging out in there. 

    So my question is: Why can't i use a third party solution that is better at catching cookies, MRUs ? or must i be locked in to an all microsoft solution? 

    PS: I think WINDOWS LIVE ONECARE is a great product that keeps getting better, but these bugs have got to be fixed or you will lose customers, period.


    Sincerely



    Techworkz
    Saturday, May 24, 2008 3:32 AM

Answers

  • The threat from cookies is extremely overblown and running a product like AdAware just to find cookies is overkill. Most cookies can be controlled through your browser settings. In Internet Explorer open Tools>Internet Options>Privacy>Advanced.. Check the box that says "Override automatic cookie handling, accept first party cookies, block third party cookies, always allow session cookies.

     

    Saturday, May 24, 2008 6:19 AM
    Moderator
  • The Microsoft AntiSpyware Beta was simply a renamed version of the product that was purchased from another vendor. The initial release of Windows Defender AntiSpyware Beta no longer contained any cookie removal and no version of any malware protection product actually produced by Microsoft ever has. The reason for this is simple, it's pointless.

     

    The purpose of cookies is to monitor your actions while browsing web sites, in general to improve your experience by using the information to provide you with other pages or selections that might be of use to you, or to collect multiple selections such as with 'shopping carts'. Third-party or 'tracking' cookies extend this ability between multiple web sites that share this information, often as a way to recognize a customer of one site when tranferring them to another affilite site. There is nothing inherent in any of this that is 'bad', unless you are surfing questionable web sites in the first place.

     

    In any case, as Jim stated above it's quite simple to use any modern web browser to block these cookies very effectively, which is the only form of protection that will really work. The reason is that deleting cookies after the fact only stops their action between browsing sessions after you perform an actual scan and remove, so they've already completed their function during your previous browsing session. Deleting the cookies is simply a 'feel good' action and has done absolutely nothing of real value or security.

     

    If you research you will find that many of the more reputable anti-spyware products have reduced or even dropped the process of cookie scanning entirely in their recent versions. The following explains the reason for that move by the developers of Spybot Search & Destroy, one of the better known and long standing products in the industry.

     

    Why do other anti-spyware applications detect so many more tracking cookies?

    http://www.safer-networking.org/en/faq/37.html

     

    OneCareBear

     

    < EDIT > BTW, if you read carefully you will find that I personally indicated that there was good reason for the changes that LavaSoft made to the operation of Ad-Aware. However, the fact that they made these changes does not in any way require that Microsoft change any of its own products in order to co-exist. In fact, if anything it would be the other way around, since Ad-Aware covers only a small portion of the malware spectrum. In any case, Microsoft has offered information to other vendors for just such purpose, so obviously this is the direction that LavaSoft should take if it wishes to support its customers.

     

    Windows Live OneCare ISV Help Center FAQ

    Why is my application incompatible with Windows Live OneCare?

    http://onecare.live.com/standard/en-us/support/isvfaq.htm

     

    Sunday, May 25, 2008 6:31 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • The threat from cookies is extremely overblown and running a product like AdAware just to find cookies is overkill. Most cookies can be controlled through your browser settings. In Internet Explorer open Tools>Internet Options>Privacy>Advanced.. Check the box that says "Override automatic cookie handling, accept first party cookies, block third party cookies, always allow session cookies.

     

    Saturday, May 24, 2008 6:19 AM
    Moderator
  • The Microsoft AntiSpyware Beta was simply a renamed version of the product that was purchased from another vendor. The initial release of Windows Defender AntiSpyware Beta no longer contained any cookie removal and no version of any malware protection product actually produced by Microsoft ever has. The reason for this is simple, it's pointless.

     

    The purpose of cookies is to monitor your actions while browsing web sites, in general to improve your experience by using the information to provide you with other pages or selections that might be of use to you, or to collect multiple selections such as with 'shopping carts'. Third-party or 'tracking' cookies extend this ability between multiple web sites that share this information, often as a way to recognize a customer of one site when tranferring them to another affilite site. There is nothing inherent in any of this that is 'bad', unless you are surfing questionable web sites in the first place.

     

    In any case, as Jim stated above it's quite simple to use any modern web browser to block these cookies very effectively, which is the only form of protection that will really work. The reason is that deleting cookies after the fact only stops their action between browsing sessions after you perform an actual scan and remove, so they've already completed their function during your previous browsing session. Deleting the cookies is simply a 'feel good' action and has done absolutely nothing of real value or security.

     

    If you research you will find that many of the more reputable anti-spyware products have reduced or even dropped the process of cookie scanning entirely in their recent versions. The following explains the reason for that move by the developers of Spybot Search & Destroy, one of the better known and long standing products in the industry.

     

    Why do other anti-spyware applications detect so many more tracking cookies?

    http://www.safer-networking.org/en/faq/37.html

     

    OneCareBear

     

    < EDIT > BTW, if you read carefully you will find that I personally indicated that there was good reason for the changes that LavaSoft made to the operation of Ad-Aware. However, the fact that they made these changes does not in any way require that Microsoft change any of its own products in order to co-exist. In fact, if anything it would be the other way around, since Ad-Aware covers only a small portion of the malware spectrum. In any case, Microsoft has offered information to other vendors for just such purpose, so obviously this is the direction that LavaSoft should take if it wishes to support its customers.

     

    Windows Live OneCare ISV Help Center FAQ

    Why is my application incompatible with Windows Live OneCare?

    http://onecare.live.com/standard/en-us/support/isvfaq.htm

     

    Sunday, May 25, 2008 6:31 PM
    Moderator
  • Last week my SysAdmin at work asked me to replace a motherboard in a Dell SX270 for him.  After I replaced it and fired it up I was alarmed to see the "biohazard" wallpaper and all kinds of pop-ups.  The user had neglected to tell the SysAdmin about this, lol.

     

    Anyway when I went to clean it out I had noticed that Adaware 2008 had just came out.  I used to use it years ago but quit after the 2006 release because it never found anything.  I tried it out on this infected machine and all I got was cookies and MRU detection.  It took a combination of SUPERAntispyware, Spybot, and SmitFraudFix to clean this machine out.

     

    Given the choice of cleaning cookies or cleaning malware I would gladly take the latter. 

     

    Monday, May 26, 2008 2:16 AM