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Make 360° product video into flat surface projection RRS feed

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  • Sorry this isn't something the ICE can do. For "object movies" like this I recommend Photosynth 2: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/photosynth/archive/2013/12/10/dreamlike-3d-the-new-photosynth-technology-has-arrived.aspx

    Tuesday, February 24, 2015 5:57 PM
  • Thank you Matt for the hint!

    So could I do such "object unrolling" from a 360° object movie:

    https://photosynth.net/preview/view/39494d95-0e28-48be-9409-597b9eb44c7a

    to a flat 'all-around' object image with Photosynth?


    • Edited by David.G.P Tuesday, February 24, 2015 7:38 PM
    Tuesday, February 24, 2015 6:47 PM
  • Sorry, but Photosynth only creates an interactive 3D experience. It doesn't provide a way to flatten the entire object into a single image.  The example link you sent is very cool... I wonder how they made their images.

    Eric Stollnitz, Computational Photography Group, Microsoft Research

    Thursday, February 26, 2015 12:12 AM
    Moderator
  • The example link you sent is very cool... I wonder how they made their images.

    Eric Stollnitz, Computational Photography Group, Microsoft Research

    That's a surprising response from someone of your experience at MSR.
    Surely you're aware of this previous MSR project?

    I would very much welcome this sort of functionality in ICE, although I would have anticipated that a clean stitch require a knowledge of each pixel's distance from the camera.

    Thursday, February 26, 2015 10:50 AM
  • OK thanks to you gents -- so, to your knowledge, is there any tool available that can do such object surface unwrapping, either from video or from multiple images? Doesn't have to be that much robust against changes in the shape of the object since it'd be only used for inanimate objects.

    Thank you already for any application hints you might have.

    Thursday, February 26, 2015 1:29 PM
  • How about if the object movie is shot from  a macro perspective such that no background is visible but only a continuously moving image of the object surface? Would ICE be able to make a panoramic image from such video?

    Seems that even an old iPhone can do something like it:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NsnKHUyilN8



    • Edited by David.G.P Thursday, February 26, 2015 3:52 PM
    Thursday, February 26, 2015 3:51 PM
  • David, what sorts of objects are you trying to flatten out?
    What is the end goal for these flattened images that you want to produce?

    What you are asking for will look very distorted even for geometrically simplistic objects, similar to how the Mercator projection of the world map stretches and distorts the surface of the Earth horribly the further away from the equator you get.

    For objects which are less geometrically symmetrical than a sphere or cylinder, the more severe the distortions will become as you attempt to flatten the geometry into a single distance geometric plane.

    The soda can works because the side of the can is flat vertically, so in a perfect case you could harvest a single row of pixels from the nearest part of the can if the camera is looking straight at the side of the can, perfectly centered on it as the can rotates around its own center. Even in this case, the parts of the can which are smaller at the top and bottom (which are at a different distance from the camera) will instantly be distorted.

    For more complex shapes such as the cradle that you linked to above, where you have a different distance from the camera for almost every single pixel, you will get very twisted results (not just in ICE but even if you were synthesizing this flattened view from a synthetic 3D model).

    A panorama succeeds in stitching flawlessly only when the point in the camera lens where the light converges (a.k.a. the 'no parallax point') does not change between any of the input photos. This means that foreground and background line up identically in every single input photo and therefore can be projected to an equal distance onto the surface of a sphere, which can then be distorted through Mercator projection to a rectangle.

    But in a case where you have a 3D object in front of the camera with your camera moving around the center of the object, all parts of the object are at different distances from the camera, meaning that the only way to correctly line up different parts of the scene is to project each pixel at different distances from the camera. This results (in a perfect world) in a 3D model, rather than a flat image which provides an orthographic view of each portion of the object.

    Even in the example of the heads, errors crop up where the features are closer to the camera than others.
    A single two dimensional image is simply insufficient for describing the full surface of any 3D object.
    For example, consider the parts of the heads which are not seen in your first example: the sides of the nose, the back view of the ears, etc.
    Anywhere that a surface curves away from the camera or is obstructed by a closer part of the object will be problematic due to differing distances.


    In any case, some keywords which may aid you in your search (although all of these have alternate meanings): 
    inverse panorama
    reverse panorama
    object movie unwrapping
    UV unwrapping
    cylinder panorama
    unwrap panorama
    • Edited by NateLawrence Thursday, February 26, 2015 11:34 PM
    Thursday, February 26, 2015 11:26 PM
  • Yeah thanks Nate for your elaboration, however -- I am aware of these implications -- and am looking for the solution, not for the problem.

    If an old iPhone can do it beautifully on complicated objects like faces, there should be other software as well that can do on inanimate objects.
    http://unwrapyourface.tumblr.com

    So,
    > how about if the object movie is shot from  a macro perspective such that no background is visible but only a continuously moving image of the object surface? Would ICE be able to make a panoramic image from such video?
    • Edited by David.G.P Friday, February 27, 2015 8:11 AM
    Friday, February 27, 2015 8:10 AM