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Changing OS with pre-existing RAID 5 as storage Win7 to WHS 2011 RRS feed

  • Question

  • Ok I'm stumped, so I plead for any insight on this problem.

    I just got a new computer and am planning to re-purpose my old one. Due to WHS 2011 being $40, I plan to replace the Windows 7 with it. I understand there is not an upgrade path from 7 to WHS 2011 so I am willing to do a clean install on the primary drive.

    My old PC is a Dell 530 with the Intel Core 2 Quad processor. Specs can be found here http://support.dell.com/support/edoc...L/appendix.htm only add-ons are an ATI 4670 Video card, a multi card reader, and 4 port USB card. Also has 4GB RAM.

    It has the G33/ICH9 chipset. Although Dell only supported RAID 0 and 1, there was a modded BIOS that enabled RAID 5. I set it up with one 500GB primary drive and three 1.5TB drives in a RAID 5.

    Because of the recent computer purchase, I am not really able to get enough additional storage space to back up the 3TB on the RAID nor have the DVD-Rs to start backing it up (also very time consuming).

    The RAID currently uses the Intel Matrix Stoage Manager. But from what I read the WHS 2011 has its own RAID manager.

    So I was wondering if I can just install the WHS 2011, replacing the Windows 7 currently on it and the RAID would remain intact or do I back up as much as I can (about 1TB of the 3TB) and throw a hail mary that the RAID does not get corrupted.

    I have already bought the WHS 2011 and my Windows 7 License went to the new computer build.

    Any info is appreceiated. Thank you.
    Wednesday, March 21, 2012 9:22 PM

Answers

  • You should be able to install exactly as you want, as long as your system drive is at least 160 GB in size. You may need to install drivers for Windows Home Server 2011 to see your RAID array, but once you've installed and configured WHS, you should be able to create shares that point to the data already on the array.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    • Marked as answer by Odaran Friday, March 23, 2012 10:54 PM
    Thursday, March 22, 2012 12:09 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • You should be able to install exactly as you want, as long as your system drive is at least 160 GB in size. You may need to install drivers for Windows Home Server 2011 to see your RAID array, but once you've installed and configured WHS, you should be able to create shares that point to the data already on the array.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    • Marked as answer by Odaran Friday, March 23, 2012 10:54 PM
    Thursday, March 22, 2012 12:09 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for the info. I copied the non-replaceable stuff and then threw a hail mary. So far so good, it worked like a charm. Although, I am not really sure what I got myself into LOL. I now realize that what WHS 2011 is and what I thought it was are two different things. Guess I get to learn about server management. Yay!!

    Once again, thanks for the help. 

    Friday, March 23, 2012 10:54 PM
  • ... Guess I get to learn about server management. ...
    Nope. Windows Home Server is designed to shield home users from traditional server management tasks; anything you need to manage in normal operation can be managed from the server dashboard.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    Saturday, March 24, 2012 12:30 AM
    Moderator
  • <Ken Warren [MVP]> wrote in message news:fb84e679-f785-497f-ac08-f14a33d266d2@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    "...anything you need to manage in normal operation can be managed from the server dashboard..."

    Except for server backups greater than 2TB's.  ;)
    Although, one may argue that if one has more than 2TB's they are not a "normal" home user!


    ____________

    BullDawg
    In God We Trust
    ____________


    BullDawg
    Saturday, March 24, 2012 12:54 AM
  • <Ken Warren [MVP]> wrote in message news:fb84e679-f785-497f-ac08-f14a33d266d2@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    "...anything you need to manage in normal operation can be managed from the server dashboard..."

    Except for server backups greater than 2TB's.  ;)
    Although, one may argue that if one has more than 2TB's they are not a "normal" home user!


    ____________

    BullDawg
    In God We Trust
    ____________


    BullDawg

    I guess I am not a "Normal" home user but I am more normal than you might think. I follow the philosophy that too many pictures and videos are better than not enough. I have taken a lot of pictures and videos of my family on vacations and such and I like to tinker around with them (i.e. slide shows and video) That is why I went with a RAID 5. It is more durable and doesn't take as much as a hit to performance. I had just happened to get a great deal on 1.5TB drives at the time. I am also big on full back ups of my PCs. (Lost one too many drive with importaint info). I know that RAID 5 is not infallible, but it puts my mind at ease that I am less likely to lose my data.

    I guess that playing with computers and seeing them evolve, 3TB does not seem like a lot to me anymore. I got "home" videos taken from a web cam back in 2001 and old (as in the old black and white ones handed down) pictures I scanned back in 1995. I am a hoarder LOL!

    Sunday, March 25, 2012 11:03 AM