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MSF and VS2008 RRS feed

  • Question

  • In reading white papers on the WSF, is sounds promising.  I was currently using VS2005 for development of a SCSF based app.  I read that WSF was tightly integrated into VS2008, so I upgraded, but I must be missing something because I can't really find anything about MSF in the IDE.  To top things off, the SCSF doesn't seem to be forward compatible so I have lost that tool as well.

     

    Where do I see the tools or wizards or whatever that constitute the tight integration with VS2008 that can justify the loss of the software factory capabilities?  All the samples given show code snippets with no mention of IDE specific activities.

     

    As I see it now based on the samples provided, its all manual coding and referencing the WSF object dlls, so why not just go back to VS2005?

     

    Enlightenment would be appreciated.

    • Moved by Max Wang_1983 Thursday, April 21, 2011 10:19 PM forum consolidation (From:SyncFx - Technical Discussion [ReadOnly])
    Thursday, December 20, 2007 6:08 PM

Answers

  • I think the integration you are referring to is the Sync Services for ADO.NET component of the Microsoft Sync Framework which has been integrated into the Visual Studio 2008 designer.  There is a whitepaper with more information here on using Sync Services for ADO.NET to do collaboration and offline data synchroniation.  Basically, what the designer allows you to do is easily get started creating a cache of data from SQL Server within a local SQL Server Compact database.  From that point you can easily enable bi-directional synchonization if you like.  You can see this designer option when you right-click on your project to add a "New Item" and you choose "Local Data Cache".  There is a good data synchronization webcast that cover this in more detail if you like.

     

    The Microsoft Sync Framework Core runtime does not yet have tight designer integration in Visual Studio, but it is certainly compatible with it.  This core component would allow you to synchronize virtually any data source you like (including non-relational databases and file systems).  Here is a whitepaper that covers the Microsoft Sync Framework Core runtime.

     

    If you could tell me a little more about what you are looking to use the Microsoft Sync Framework for, I might be able to point you in the correct direction for more information. 

     

    Liam

    Thursday, December 20, 2007 6:47 PM

All replies

  • I think the integration you are referring to is the Sync Services for ADO.NET component of the Microsoft Sync Framework which has been integrated into the Visual Studio 2008 designer.  There is a whitepaper with more information here on using Sync Services for ADO.NET to do collaboration and offline data synchroniation.  Basically, what the designer allows you to do is easily get started creating a cache of data from SQL Server within a local SQL Server Compact database.  From that point you can easily enable bi-directional synchonization if you like.  You can see this designer option when you right-click on your project to add a "New Item" and you choose "Local Data Cache".  There is a good data synchronization webcast that cover this in more detail if you like.

     

    The Microsoft Sync Framework Core runtime does not yet have tight designer integration in Visual Studio, but it is certainly compatible with it.  This core component would allow you to synchronize virtually any data source you like (including non-relational databases and file systems).  Here is a whitepaper that covers the Microsoft Sync Framework Core runtime.

     

    If you could tell me a little more about what you are looking to use the Microsoft Sync Framework for, I might be able to point you in the correct direction for more information. 

     

    Liam

    Thursday, December 20, 2007 6:47 PM
  •  

    You are exactly right.  The app is going to be run on occasionally connected devices, so I was looking at that aspect of the sync framework.  Probably where I saw the VS2008 stuff.  I'll check out the web cast and other links and contine up the learning curve.

     

    Thanks

    Thursday, December 20, 2007 6:57 PM