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Problem restoring 2nd disk in client computer RRS feed

  • Question

  • I cannot find any support for this problem. Perhaps I don't know how to look it up properly.

    My client system runs Windows 7 with two RAID 0 arrays managed by the motherboard. The first array, labeled as Drive C, runs my OS and programs, while my data resides on the second array, Drive D.

    Since I back both drives up on my Windows Home Server nightly, I figured changing out my Drive D would be simple. Remove the drives, replace, restore. Right? WRONG!!

    Apparently when a non-system containing drive is "restored", the restore consists of copying the files from the backup. There is no way to create an image of the drive, if I read the instructions correctly. And dragging and dropping the entire drive doesn't work. It seems like directories with too many files, or perhaps directories that are too large, refuse to copy. I found myself having to create a directory on the new drive and copy the files from that directory on the server to the new drive. For 500 GB of data??!! It took me three DAYS of ATTENDED copying to restore the drive. Furthermore, a number of files "are not found". I had to write down the files and go back to another back up to find them. The server dropped connection a couple of times...In short, the process is ridiculously cumbersome. AND I now need to go back and manually compare the new disk with the backup to ensure all of the files copied over correctly.

    Perhaps I read something wrong, and there is a better way to restore an auxiliary drive from my WHS? If this is the process, I need to find a better way to back up my drives.

    Thanks!

    Diana

    Sunday, April 11, 2010 10:56 PM

All replies

  • I cannot find any support for this problem. Perhaps I don't know how to look it up properly.

    My client system runs Windows 7 with two RAID 0 arrays managed by the motherboard. The first array, labeled as Drive C, runs my OS and programs, while my data resides on the second array, Drive D.

    Since I back both drives up on my Windows Home Server nightly, I figured changing out my Drive D would be simple. Remove the drives, replace, restore. Right? WRONG!!

    Apparently when a non-system containing drive is "restored", the restore consists of copying the files from the backup. There is no way to create an image of the drive, if I read the instructions correctly. And dragging and dropping the entire drive doesn't work. It seems like directories with too many files, or perhaps directories that are too large, refuse to copy. I found myself having to create a directory on the new drive and copy the files from that directory on the server to the new drive. For 500 GB of data??!! It took me three DAYS of ATTENDED copying to restore the drive. Furthermore, a number of files "are not found". I had to write down the files and go back to another back up to find them. The server dropped connection a couple of times...In short, the process is ridiculously cumbersome. AND I now need to go back and manually compare the new disk with the backup to ensure all of the files copied over correctly.

    Perhaps I read something wrong, and there is a better way to restore an auxiliary drive from my WHS? If this is the process, I need to find a better way to back up my drives.

    Thanks!

    Diana

    You should use the restore CD to restore the entire volume (instead of the file restore method from within Windows).  You can download the latest version from here and get more information about it in the Help menu in the Console.
    Monday, April 12, 2010 1:31 AM
    Moderator
  • The intended way to restore an entire drive (or a volume on a RAID array, as in your case) is to use the Restore CD on the computer you're restoring to. You'll need drivers for the restore cd to be able to see your array; those drivers are in the root of every drive backed up, in a folder named Windows Home Server Drivers for Restore . If you have a 64 bit version of Windows, though, you won't be able to use the drivers in that location, as the Restore CD is 32 bit only. In that case, you'll need to obtain 32 bit drivers (from the manufacturer of your motherboard or the RAID HBA, usually) and supply those instead.

    Since your system is presumably running, you can also try using C:\Program Files\Windows Home Server\clientrestorewizard.exe . This is the same program as the Restore CD, just hosted in a fully functional Windows environment.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, April 12, 2010 2:02 AM
    Moderator