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XP Failed Authenticity - Now Will Not Boot RRS feed

  • Question

  • This posting is for a third party.  Really.  She bought a Gateway laptop with XP Home, for which she has the software CD.  She took the laptop for some repair, and the shop "upgraded" her to Windows XP Pro.  She does not have the XP Pro CD.  The WGA pop ups warned her that the installed copy of XP was not genuine, but she never acted on it, since she could not return the software to Microsoft.

    Ten days later, she cannot boot the laptop at all.  It will come up to the Windows splash screen, then a Gateway splash screen then to the menu to select Boot mode (Normal, Safe Mode, etc).  No matter what boot option she selects, she always comes back to the Boot Menu screen.  I have walked her through a boot directly to Safe Mode via F8, but the same problem occurs.  She cannot get past the Boot Menu selection screen.

    Is this related to a WGA problem or is is a Gateway issue or ???  Has anyone else run across this problem before?  Would she be better just reinstalling the version of XP Home that came with the original purchase or is there a less drastic solution?

    Thanks for any help you can provide.

    Saturday, August 8, 2009 4:48 AM

Answers

  • Hello Ms.M,

    If at all possible, she should return the computer to the shop and require them to (a) rescue her data, (b) cleanly install the Gateway copy of XP Home that was originally on the computer, and then (c) put her data back as it was before they messed it all up.  If they can't or won't do that, she should demand a full refund for the money she paid to have them mess up her computer.  If they balk, threaten to submit a Microsoft software piracy report at www.microsoft.com/piracy .

    The problem with the computer not booting is certainly not related to WGA, since the WGA files and registry entries have nothing to do with the computer loading or running the Operating System.

    IMHO, the best solution is for your friend to backup and offload their data from the computer, then run the Gateway supplied Recovery solution that will put the original, Genuine, factory installation of XP Home back onto her computer.  Gateway generally supplies recovery discs with their computers.

    The bad part about that solution is that she needs to backup and offload any valuable data from the computer first, because typically the recovery process erases all user data from the hard disk drive.  Since the computer won't start, she will have to use an "offline operating system" (one that runs from the CD/DVD drive and not the hard disk drive, such as BartPE or the Ultimate Boot CD) to start the computer and access the files to be copied onto, say, an external hard disk drive, a network computer, or depending upon how much data there is, one or more flash drives.


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Saturday, August 8, 2009 10:22 PM

All replies

  • Hello Ms.M,

    If at all possible, she should return the computer to the shop and require them to (a) rescue her data, (b) cleanly install the Gateway copy of XP Home that was originally on the computer, and then (c) put her data back as it was before they messed it all up.  If they can't or won't do that, she should demand a full refund for the money she paid to have them mess up her computer.  If they balk, threaten to submit a Microsoft software piracy report at www.microsoft.com/piracy .

    The problem with the computer not booting is certainly not related to WGA, since the WGA files and registry entries have nothing to do with the computer loading or running the Operating System.

    IMHO, the best solution is for your friend to backup and offload their data from the computer, then run the Gateway supplied Recovery solution that will put the original, Genuine, factory installation of XP Home back onto her computer.  Gateway generally supplies recovery discs with their computers.

    The bad part about that solution is that she needs to backup and offload any valuable data from the computer first, because typically the recovery process erases all user data from the hard disk drive.  Since the computer won't start, she will have to use an "offline operating system" (one that runs from the CD/DVD drive and not the hard disk drive, such as BartPE or the Ultimate Boot CD) to start the computer and access the files to be copied onto, say, an external hard disk drive, a network computer, or depending upon how much data there is, one or more flash drives.


    For great advice on all topics XP, visit http://www.annoyances.org/exec/forum/winxp
    Saturday, August 8, 2009 10:22 PM
  • Thanks for the advice, Dan.  There are some problems with executing it exactly as you suggest, but the essence is pretty clear.  Sadly, the shop that did the damage is in Arizona and my sister is currently in Montana, but she is going to take the PC into a local repair shop, with her original disks, and see what they can do for her.

    Happily, she does not have any data that have not been backed up.  It might mean reloading apps.  I will remind her to bring the recover disk to the shop.

    Again, thanks for the clear and concise answer.

    M^2
    Sunday, August 9, 2009 5:28 PM