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Disc error - what strategy? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I have a disc problem apparently, but somewhat confused how to interpret the messages and press forward.

    I use a RocketRaid 2320 with 7 drives connected and 1 (system)drive on chip-SATA. I get a message from the RR controller that there is a disc problem and that the disk is disconnected. WHS of course makes a note of that and sends its warning.

    Checking the event reporter, the WHS har never noted any disc problems during its chkdsk routines prior to the RR diagnosis. Rescanning the discs on RR reconnects the disc in question, but WHS is still unhappy with the situation.
     
    Started the chkall command suggested in this forum when leaving for work this morning (17:30 here now) and notice now that the disc in question has been disconnected again and that two chkdsk processes are still on. Rescanning RR once again restores the disk, but two chkdsk processes have not proceeded for the past 30 minutes (stage 4 of 5 on both of them).

    Also the console now invites me to do a repair.

    What to do now? Stopping the chkdsk is risky, I would imagine. There seems to be some activity although not reported on the chkdks.exe panel.

    Another question: Since WHS is not reporting any problems at the outset, is there a chance that the error reporting from the RR-controller is erraneous?

    For now I will just await the completion of the chkdsk and hopefully I have received some clever guidance from someone who knows what is going on.
    Wednesday, March 3, 2010 4:39 PM

Answers

  • Windows Home Server is primarily an OEM product. There are requirements that OEMs must meet with regard to the servers they manufacture, including drive lights that let you identify a particular drive. In a self-built server, the only guaranteed way to identify a drive is to disconnect one; your server will show taht drive as "missing". Then see if the missing drive is the right one. This won't damage your storage pool or files. Almost as reliable is the Disk Management Windows Home Server add-in. This adds a tab to the server console, and is not the same as the Disk Management MMC snap-in that you may be familiar with from other operating systems. The Disk Management add-in will let you create a wireframe representation of your server, with drive positions marked so that you can identify a particular drive more easily.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by hauge48 Thursday, March 4, 2010 7:41 PM
    Thursday, March 4, 2010 7:26 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Yea let chkdsk do its thing. If it repeats, then I'm guessing a faulty controller.
    Wednesday, March 3, 2010 7:35 PM
  • You should assume that you have problems with that disk. Your best bet is going to be to replace it. Try removing it from the storage pool using the console (while it's connected). If that succeeds, great. Otherwise, you'll probably have to disconnect it physically before you start the removal. In that case see this FAQ for information on what data will be at risk.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by hauge48 Wednesday, March 3, 2010 9:49 PM
    • Unmarked as answer by hauge48 Thursday, March 4, 2010 5:46 PM
    Wednesday, March 3, 2010 7:36 PM
    Moderator
  • There must be an easy answer, but I cannot see it:

    I have added a disk, but how do I know which disk to remove? I have 3 candidates having identical Disk Name. I know what physical disk it is, but how do I identify that disk in the storage pool?

    I realize that I can go about it in a trial-and-error method by removing and subsequently disconnecting and see what happens, but hello, there must be a smarter way!

    Eh.. I just realized that I can move the connector from RR to the chip and then I will know (location shifted from SCSI to ATA). 

    But still, how can I identify a disk in the pool?
    Thursday, March 4, 2010 5:57 PM
  • Windows Home Server is primarily an OEM product. There are requirements that OEMs must meet with regard to the servers they manufacture, including drive lights that let you identify a particular drive. In a self-built server, the only guaranteed way to identify a drive is to disconnect one; your server will show taht drive as "missing". Then see if the missing drive is the right one. This won't damage your storage pool or files. Almost as reliable is the Disk Management Windows Home Server add-in. This adds a tab to the server console, and is not the same as the Disk Management MMC snap-in that you may be familiar with from other operating systems. The Disk Management add-in will let you create a wireframe representation of your server, with drive positions marked so that you can identify a particular drive more easily.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by hauge48 Thursday, March 4, 2010 7:41 PM
    Thursday, March 4, 2010 7:26 PM
    Moderator