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Backup of the system partition RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've read a lot about what you must do if the primary disk (system disk) fails; Reinstal, reindex for tombstones e.g.

    Isn't just easier to make a backup of the primary diskdrive? So that you don't have to reinstall every application, user accounts and so forth?

    In XP I use the PowerQuest V2i Protector wich makes an image of a specified harddrive and is able to restore it to a new harddrive. I know a lot of other applications do the same.
    Wednesday, September 12, 2007 12:18 PM

Answers

  • Please note that "reindexing for tombstones" will be required anyway if the system disk fails. Any backup is likely to be out of date by at least a few hours, which means that files may have moved from one location to another.

    The most common scenario for a failed primary disk is probably going to be on an OEM unit from a vendor like HP or Tranquil. Microsoft requires OEMs to have a recovery option in the BIOS which will put the server into recovery mode, then there will need to be some mechanism to allow a reinstallation without KVM attached to the server. Also, most users probably won't be installing applications on their servers. At most, they may install one or two add-ins, but those are easily reinstalled from the Software share after the server recovery is complete. (Add-ins with extensive configuration options should probably have a built-in way to back up and restore their own configuration. This should not be something that Microsoft has to provide.) Recreating users is the work of a few moments. If you have a third-party application installed (I have Firefly Media Server and Readerware server installed, for example) then you will have to reinstall the software, but the data should be safe.
    Wednesday, September 12, 2007 3:07 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,

    Yes I agree as well, but we will see soon that some addon will comes from defrents compines for backingup the system drive.

    Just we need t ogive it time I guess, it just now WHS come out to the market.

    My best.
    Wednesday, September 12, 2007 12:24 PM
  • Please note that "reindexing for tombstones" will be required anyway if the system disk fails. Any backup is likely to be out of date by at least a few hours, which means that files may have moved from one location to another.

    The most common scenario for a failed primary disk is probably going to be on an OEM unit from a vendor like HP or Tranquil. Microsoft requires OEMs to have a recovery option in the BIOS which will put the server into recovery mode, then there will need to be some mechanism to allow a reinstallation without KVM attached to the server. Also, most users probably won't be installing applications on their servers. At most, they may install one or two add-ins, but those are easily reinstalled from the Software share after the server recovery is complete. (Add-ins with extensive configuration options should probably have a built-in way to back up and restore their own configuration. This should not be something that Microsoft has to provide.) Recreating users is the work of a few moments. If you have a third-party application installed (I have Firefly Media Server and Readerware server installed, for example) then you will have to reinstall the software, but the data should be safe.
    Wednesday, September 12, 2007 3:07 PM
    Moderator
  • Ken, when you installed ReaderWare, did you put the database on the C drive, or in a replicated folder on the D Drive?  I actually set up a separate server for SoftWare602 LanSuite mail server, redirected My Documents, my Linksys Media server, etc, and installed the WHS client on it so everything gets backed up nightly.  I would love to be able to get rid of the extra server, but am concerned about the data being safe.

     

    Wednesday, September 12, 2007 9:06 PM
  • I put the Readerware data in a shared folder with duplication turned on. This is required because Readerware client needs access to the folder in which cover images are stored. Readerware doesn't do incremental reads/writes to it's data, however. It loads everything into memory and operates from there. When it shuts down it flushes data to disk. So it's open/read/close on startup, and open/write/close on shutdown. Shutdowns are scheduled for once a week, due to some garbage collection issues...
    Wednesday, September 12, 2007 10:08 PM
    Moderator