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Identifying Failed Drive? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Suppose WHS tells me that one of my drives is on the way out.

    How do I identify the physical drive in order to replace it?

    "Server Storage" only lists the drive's model number, no SN .... which, unless I'm missing something, seems to border on the inane.

    I have the "Disk Management" add-in, but it's "Details" dialog returns "Unknown" for "Serial Number" on three out of five drives.

    All drives are 1TB WD Greens: 3 EACS' and two EADS'.   The "Unknown" does not correlate 100% with EACS vs EADS.

    I'm probably missing something obvious.

    But, in the rare case that I'm not, what's left?  

    Labeling each drive with the System-Assigned "Drive Number"  (e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4...)?
    Friday, July 24, 2009 11:31 PM

Answers

  • Windows Home Server, by itself, doesn't offer any good way to identify the disks in your server.

    For an OEM device like the HP and Acer units, the manufacturer has taken care of that for you. For a home-built unit, you can use the Disk Management add-in, which can identify disks for you (assuming you identify them properly when you install them), or you can use some manual method of identifying disks.

    It's also safe to simply shut your server down and remove a disk. If you have a bad disk showing in the console, remove it from the storage pool using the console, then shut down and disconnect what you think is the disk. If you get the wrong one, try again. You won't lose data as a result of disconnecting and reconnecting disks.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 2:14 AM
    Moderator
  • Suppose WHS tells me that one of my drives is on the way out.

    How do I identify the physical drive in order to replace it?

    "Server Storage" only lists the drive's model number, no SN .... which, unless I'm missing something, seems to border on the inane.

    I have the "Disk Management" add-in, but it's "Details" dialog returns "Unknown" for "Serial Number" on three out of five drives.

    All drives are 1TB WD Greens: 3 EACS' and two EADS'.   The "Unknown" does not correlate 100% with EACS vs EADS.

    I'm probably missing something obvious.

    But, in the rare case that I'm not, what's left?  

    Labeling each drive with the System-Assigned "Drive Number"  (e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4...)?

    Power down the server, disconnect a drive, then power up the server.  One drive will show up as "missing".  That is obviously the drive you just disconnected.  Power down the server again, reconnect that drive, disconnect a different drive, and repeat the process until you have determined all of them.  (Frankly, I would strongly recommend you use the Disk Management add-in, create a wireframe diagram of your server, and map them all out now.  It will be much easier to determine which drive is failing later on, should it ever occur.)
    Saturday, July 25, 2009 12:02 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Suppose WHS tells me that one of my drives is on the way out.

    How do I identify the physical drive in order to replace it?

    "Server Storage" only lists the drive's model number, no SN .... which, unless I'm missing something, seems to border on the inane.

    I have the "Disk Management" add-in, but it's "Details" dialog returns "Unknown" for "Serial Number" on three out of five drives.

    All drives are 1TB WD Greens: 3 EACS' and two EADS'.   The "Unknown" does not correlate 100% with EACS vs EADS.

    I'm probably missing something obvious.

    But, in the rare case that I'm not, what's left?  

    Labeling each drive with the System-Assigned "Drive Number"  (e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4...)?

    Power down the server, disconnect a drive, then power up the server.  One drive will show up as "missing".  That is obviously the drive you just disconnected.  Power down the server again, reconnect that drive, disconnect a different drive, and repeat the process until you have determined all of them.  (Frankly, I would strongly recommend you use the Disk Management add-in, create a wireframe diagram of your server, and map them all out now.  It will be much easier to determine which drive is failing later on, should it ever occur.)
    Saturday, July 25, 2009 12:02 AM
    Moderator
  • Power down the server, disconnect a drive, then power up the server.  One drive will show up as "missing".  That is obviously the drive you just disconnected.  Power down the server again, reconnect that drive, disconnect a different drive, and repeat the process until you have determined all of them.  (Frankly, I would strongly recommend you use the Disk Management add-in, create a wireframe diagram of your server, and map them all out now.  It will be much easier to determine which drive is failing later on, should it ever occur.)
    That's all done - except for the wire frame thing, which I don't even begin to understand.

    But the core question is "When a problem arises, how does WHS name the specific drive that it deems tb failing?"


    Serial Number? (e.g. WD-WCAU40628353)

    Drive Number (e.g.  1, 2, 3, 4, 5...)

    If it is Serial Number, there's definately a problem per the OP.

    If it is Drive Number, that works for me.

    If it is something else, seems like a good idea to know/test whatever it is before the big day.
    Saturday, July 25, 2009 12:36 AM
  • But the core question is "When a problem arises, how does WHS name the specific drive that it deems tb failing?"
    I may have a partial answer to that question - provoked when I created a new "DVDs" share with Duplication=True and left it overnight with all my .ISOs being moved to that share and, of course, ran out of space.

    Looks to me like they tell us the model number of the drive, but nothing useful.

    e.g.  http://tinyurl.com/l4uahj

    This can't be, right?

    I have to be missing something that relates the bad drive to some unique identifying characteristic  (serial number, "Drive 1", "Drive 2"... or something else...

    (NB that in this case, it just happens that model# is unique - but as soon as I add that second ...00M2B0 drive from the "Non-Storage Hard Drives" list, it will no longer be unique..... also note the two "...00D6B1" drives. 

    ??

    Monday, July 27, 2009 11:29 PM
  • Windows Home Server, by itself, doesn't offer any good way to identify the disks in your server.

    For an OEM device like the HP and Acer units, the manufacturer has taken care of that for you. For a home-built unit, you can use the Disk Management add-in, which can identify disks for you (assuming you identify them properly when you install them), or you can use some manual method of identifying disks.

    It's also safe to simply shut your server down and remove a disk. If you have a bad disk showing in the console, remove it from the storage pool using the console, then shut down and disconnect what you think is the disk. If you get the wrong one, try again. You won't lose data as a result of disconnecting and reconnecting disks.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 2:14 AM
    Moderator
  • Windows Home Server, by itself, doesn't offer any good way to identify the disks in your server.

    It's also safe to simply shut your server down and remove a disk. If you have a bad disk showing in the console, remove it from the storage pool using the console, then shut down and disconnect what you think is the disk. If you get the wrong one, try again. You won't lose data as a result of disconnecting and reconnecting disks.
    Thanks.

    That seems to nail it: there is no explicit identification, but trial-and-error works.

    Just on GPs, I put a strip of white electrical tape on each disc and write thereon the model number, serial number, and "Disk" number.
    Just realized there's also a GUID for each disc - and I guess I'll add that to the each disc's laundry list.

    (FWIW, Disk Management does not always return the serial number.   Bad disc?   Bad application?  Who knows?)

    But as long as I can do the trial-and-error thing it seems like I'm covered.

    In fact, I just went through it after I accidentally loosened a power connector while rummaging around in the server case.
    Sheesh!  Was I ever relieved once I found/fixed the loose connector and everything came up a-ok!!!
    • Edited by PeteCress Tuesday, July 28, 2009 4:01 PM
    Tuesday, July 28, 2009 1:44 PM
  • For anybody else slogging through this thread, I found the solution: Hard Disk Sentinel.

    Shows drives, serial numbers, and much more.

    Highly recommended.


    -- PeteCresswell
    • Proposed as answer by PeteCress Friday, December 10, 2010 4:13 PM
    Friday, December 10, 2010 4:12 PM
  • I slogged through the thread with the same issue. The Hard Disk Sentinel idea was very helpful. Thanks
    Sunday, March 13, 2011 2:08 PM