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no wonder people uses pirated windows RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • A mate of mine had a pirate version of windows pro on his computer, but because he is now starting a business, he decided to buy a OEM version. I eventully managed to get this OEM version on, after doing a repair windows, but because the OEM version then said that we had no days left before activation, windows would not allow me to get any further than the log in screen. The problem then was that the network paret did not work, which stopped the computer connecting to the net to activate windows. Anyway in the end I phond the free phone activation service. What a shambles, it took so long and the quality of the audio on the phone was awful,. it was only because of my mate listening on the other phone that we managed to put the activation code in first time.
     
    Surely there must be a better way, I know MS have problems with piracy, but this activatiopn lot do not stop it. I am going to build myself a new computer in a few months time and there is no way I am going thouh all of that again, I rather use a pirate version of Xp, at leats there is no activation to bother about.
     
    Anyway it is about time MS dropped the price of Windows, we are getting a product that is over priced and have never been great since it launch, with all the updates the code must be more fragmented now that it was to start with.
     
    How I wish Linux had more software and could Kick Billy Gates behind.
     
    Wednesday, May 17, 2006 9:26 AM

All replies

  • OEM versions of Windows XP should only be installed as a "clean install" since the illegal, pirated version is likely corrupt with missing, altered, or damaged system files. If you had performed a clean install, you would not have experienced the problem you described.

    Clean Install Windows XP http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html

    Wednesday, May 17, 2006 12:17 PM
    Moderator
  • A clean install would have been more of a pain as there is a lot of software ont he computer that would have to be reinstalled  and some of it uses SQL, something I have very little knowledge about. The whole system is now once again backed up using ghost so if it goes belly up, at least we can go to the backup.
     
    What I was trying to get over is that this activation thing is a pain in the neck and it really should be made easier. Anyway why on earth should we have to have this hassle to install any software? If I buy software I want to install it and use it, not muck around with stiupid activation codes.;
     
    I do also know how to do a clean install, after all I use windows XP and with the amount of time it fails, I had good practice in doing clean installs.
     
    Now I use Ghost, at least now it is easier to to reinstore. Microsoft really should sort out windows and get it more reliable and secure, after all we pay a lot of money for it and get second rate software.
    People would soon complain is they buy a car that have to be updated every month.
     
    I think we should go back to Amiga days, at least the software was not bloated, something with Pc software writers seems to like doing , MS is the worse of the lot.
     
    I don't like Microsoft, it is just a shame that there is no decent alternative.
     
    Thursday, May 18, 2006 11:19 PM
  • Just per interest: how did he buy the OEM version? These are normally bundled with hardware, so did he buy a PC to get an OEM windows? Surely the retail version would be the right route for when you're building your own PC.

    ---

    BTW your car comparison would be: windows is a car parked in a bad area and you have to constantly update the alarm system if you mind being burgled all the time, because the thugs always come up with new methods of breaking in. In this case the car manufacturer does it for free 8-)

    regards
    realraven
    Wednesday, May 24, 2006 6:51 PM
  • OEM versions are always for sale if you look around and there is a lot of well known companies that sell OEM software. There is no difference between the retail version and the OEM version, apart from the fact you do nto get a posh box or support from MS with the OEM. But you do save a lot of money.
     
    MS needs to bring the price down a bit.
     
     
     
    MS said that XP was the most secure windows ever when it was launched and it was only a few days after the launch, that they had problems. I think MS have not got too big for their boots and makes an O/s that is flawed, bloated and insecure.
     
    You only have to look at vista,I am amazed that I have to buy a new graphics card just to run Vista, I thought it was a joke, but it is not. Come on this is an O/S, not a 3D game.
    If vista needs this much power just to run, then how much more power will people need just to run an office suite?  going by what is needed to run Vista, what on earth will the new Office need? 2GB of memory, 150Gb hard drive just to install it, a twin core 300Ghz CPU and the top of the range ATI video card?
     
     
    I do not see the sense in it myself, I certainly do not think it is worth spedning money in getting a faster computer, when the next O/s will slow it down again and will have more bugs, insecurities and of cause the Dreaded DRM rubbish.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Monday, June 5, 2006 10:22 PM
  • Liquidmetal,

    There are significant differences between retail licenses for XP and OEM licenses for XP.  You touched on one, from where does the support come.  The other major difference:

    OEM software is "married" to the hardware onto which is is originally installed and cannot be moved to a new computer.  Retail can be moved to as many computers as desired, one at a time.

    You will not have to buy a new graphics card to run Vista.  Vista will install only the tiered components that the computer upon which it is being installed can support.  The AeroGlass visual interface requires a lot of horsepower, so if you desire the eye-candy AeroGlass display, you will need a powerful card.  Otherwise, Vista will use the standard display cards that XP uses.

    Monday, June 5, 2006 10:49 PM
  •  Dan at IT Associates wrote:

    OEM software is "married" to the hardware onto which is is originally installed and cannot be moved to a new computer. Retail can be moved to as many computers as desired, one at a time.



    exactly what I thought as well (and didn't dare to say). OEM means DELL or Compaq or hp. Build your own PC and you have to use Retail by rights...

    That would mean any OEM software you can buy over the net would be illegal? Or can one prove that the hardware was thrown away / replaced by a new one?

    Buying OEM without hw is definitely a dodgy one although nobody can force me (after having bought that dodgy weak Celeron) not to upgrade my MOBO, then HD, then CPU... I always thought what's the point in buying a bad PC just to get at a restricted OS... go retail and get the whole hog. I don't want the software to tell me what HW it can run on.

    just my 2 cents
      realraven
    Tuesday, June 6, 2006 10:02 PM
  •  realraven2000 wrote:
     Dan at IT Associates wrote:

    OEM software is "married" to the hardware onto which is is originally installed and cannot be moved to a new computer. Retail can be moved to as many computers as desired, one at a time.



    exactly what I thought as well (and didn't dare to say). OEM means DELL or Compaq or hp. Build your own PC and you have to use Retail by rights...

    >SNIP<

    Not necessarily.  MS changed the agreement between itself and systembuilder/OEMs last year.

    To use a current systembuilder/OEM license for XP, a person actually has to agree to two licenses.

    The first is on the outer envelope or box that contains the actual CD/UserGuide/COA package.  This is called the Break-Seal systembuilder agreement and it is between MS and whomever breaks the seal on the envelope--the person is agreeing to assume the role of a systembuilder as defined by the agreement.

    The second is the normal EULA that comes with an OEM piece of software--that the EULA is between the End User (consumer) and the systembuilder, with MS not being a party to the agreement, which is a surprise to a lot of people.  This is the one that you breeze by on the way to installing the software!

    So if you buy a systembuilder/OEM license for XP, you are both the systembuilder and the end user.

    Tuesday, June 6, 2006 10:44 PM
  •  Carey Frisch wrote:

    OEM versions of Windows XP should only be installed as a "clean install" since the illegal, pirated version is likely corrupt with missing, altered, or damaged system files. If you had performed a clean install, you would not have experienced the problem you described.

    Clean Install Windows XP http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/cleanxpinstall.html

     
    There was too much on there to do a clean instal and it was easier to just do a repair.
    If it did not work then I would have done a clean install. the system was backed up using ghost anyway.
     
    I do know how to do a clean install, I have done it enough times thanks to windows unreliability.
     
    Wednesday, July 5, 2006 10:18 PM
  •  Dan at IT Associates wrote:

    Liquidmetal,

    There are significant differences between retail licenses for XP and OEM licenses for XP.  You touched on one, from where does the support come.  The other major difference:

    OEM software is "married" to the hardware onto which is is originally installed and cannot be moved to a new computer.  Retail can be moved to as many computers as desired, one at a time.

    You will not have to buy a new graphics card to run Vista.  Vista will install only the tiered components that the computer upon which it is being installed can support.  The AeroGlass visual interface requires a lot of horsepower, so if you desire the eye-candy AeroGlass display, you will need a powerful card.  Otherwise, Vista will use the standard display cards that XP uses.

     
     
    OEM is only married to to the hardware if a big computer manufacture like Dell or Packard Bell do a deal with Micosoft. You can buy OEM XP that will work with any machine.
    You just activate it the same way as a normal reatil version of windows.
     
    Support is not too much of aproblem, Micirosft only provides support for a while and then you have to pay anyway, you can still download updates and it is all legal.
     
     
    You try running vista using a Geforce 4 MX400 graphics card and see how far you get. I use the beta on mine and it did not like it, even when I got rid of all the fancy stuff.
    I got myself a second hand ATI Radion 9600Pro, which does work better with Vista, but I think I have seen enought of Vista to not to beother with it when it is launched. I don't mind mucking around with it on my second hard drive as the beta, but I would certainly not buy it.
     
     
    Wednesday, July 5, 2006 10:25 PM
  •  realraven2000 wrote:
     Dan at IT Associates wrote:

    OEM software is "married" to the hardware onto which is is originally installed and cannot be moved to a new computer. Retail can be moved to as many computers as desired, one at a time.



    exactly what I thought as well (and didn't dare to say). OEM means DELL or Compaq or hp. Build your own PC and you have to use Retail by rights...

    That would mean any OEM software you can buy over the net would be illegal? Or can one prove that the hardware was thrown away / replaced by a new one?

    Buying OEM without hw is definitely a dodgy one although nobody can force me (after having bought that dodgy weak Celeron) not to upgrade my MOBO, then HD, then CPU... I always thought what's the point in buying a bad PC just to get at a restricted OS... go retail and get the whole hog. I don't want the software to tell me what HW it can run on.

    just my 2 cents
      realraven
     
     
    DELL and all the other big manufactures use branded OEM. But smaller system builders do not, they use a unbranded OEM version, which more or less comes in a cardboard envelope with a small book. 100% legal and nothing dodgy at all and all above board.
     
    I think you are getting confused, OEM from Dell, compaq normally already have some sort of activation code and will only work with their machines, but the OEM my mate got have to be activated. It will work on any hardware, it just to be activated again if you change too much, which is stupid anyway, why on earth should I have to re-activate a O/S because I changed my motherboard/CPu or any other part?
     
     
     
     
     
    Wednesday, July 5, 2006 10:31 PM
  • Liquidmetal,

    I stand by my statement:  "OEM software is "married" to the hardware onto which is is originally installed and cannot be moved to a new computer."

    This includes both the major manufacturer OEM as well as systembuilder (local computer assembler) OEM.

    The enforcement mechanism for each of the two is different, but the EULA provision that marries the OS to the hardware onto which it is originally installed is the same.

    Thursday, July 6, 2006 1:51 AM