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Do I really need WHS for NAS RRS feed

  • Question

  • I wish to add a server computer to my network that offers an internal raid volume as nas. it would be formatted using Ext2-3 on a primary partition (GPT) so that my media devices (satelite boxes etc) can both read and write to it. The server would be joined to the domain and controlled by a strict group policy. The media devices are identified to active directory by their mac addresses. I have volume licenses for server 2008 r2 enterprise and am hoping that this os would suffice. Can whs or server 2008 declare their internal volumes as nas?
    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 12:26 AM

Answers

  • If sharing that disk space via EXT2 or EXT3 is important to you, I recommend you use an OS that will make full use of the capabilities of that FS. Which no Windows OS will do.

    Beyond that, I can't tell you if what you want to do will work, as I haven't done it. Probably using vanilla Windows Server 2008 R2 will be a better starting point for you, since (as I said previously) you won't be able to manage your EXT2 volumes via the built in tools using Windows Home Server. At that point, you'll be back to basic OS functionality plus whatever you install from the desktop anyway.

    As for whether any given OS "has NAS capabilities", you will need to consult lists of product features for the various OSes to see if the particular features you want are either mentioned explicitly or implied by other features which are mentioned. 


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Naemoor Wednesday, June 22, 2011 11:12 PM
    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 12:51 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Me again, some more information for you. I specifically wish to use 1 or more pci express raid cards. These cards have 24 usb2 ports connected as 3 bunches of 8 and the cards daisy chain as your requirements expand. Thus I can utilize the full power of a server, the security of my strict group policy and the expansion capabilities made possible by all the spare pci express slots.
    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 12:32 AM
  • You don't want to use Windows Home Server if you want to have linux filesystems directly mounted to, and shared from, your server. WHS won't manage the volume; instead it will show it as available for adding to server storage in the console application. In addition, joining Windows Home Server to a domain is a EULA violation and will eventually result in your server rebooting every hour.

    You should, to be honest, use linux if you want a linux file system.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 1:51 AM
    Moderator
  • As usual I have failed to give sufficient information. I will have the big GPT RAID partitioned off into useful chunks. The biggest chunk of all will be NTFS. The LINUX partition is there only because media devices demand they be formatted that way. At regular intervals I would copy the files across. I have installed the Ext2-3 files system to most Windows OSs

     

    If joining WHS to the domain would infringe the EULA (If only the document was legal, that might mean something) I'll back offon this one. It is just the extra expense of buying standalone Buffalo boxes that I was trying to avoid. Plugging in a 3TByte USB HD to a Media box offers no redundancy, and I can return home from a trip to find that the drive has failed. They like to overheat during the recording of 2 HD movies.

     

    So here goes. If I leave the server off the domain will it show a LINUX partition as NAS to the network? The LINUX IFS installed so that Windows can Read/Write to the volume. Then you see, all disks will be internal, and plugged into the 1 big RAID tower with redundant power supplies and controllers, supporting a checksummed stripe of mirrored pairs (RAID 10)

     

    If not, does Windows Server (2008 R2 Enterprise, I could install a copy of DataCentre if I had to) have NAS capabilities

     

    Thanking you in anticipation

     

    Ian

     

    P.S   "The fact that I respect LINUX does not override the fact that I loathe it with avengeance. There is nothing like having something forced compulsorily upon you for stirring up the emotions. That said it is nothing to the bile and phlegm I can muster at the thought of people who CHOSE to use Mac Servers because they likeed their Mac desktop."


    For someone who's programming predates DOS, I really should have the hang of this by now
    • Marked as answer by Naemoor Wednesday, June 22, 2011 11:11 PM
    • Unmarked as answer by Naemoor Wednesday, June 22, 2011 11:12 PM
    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 6:57 AM
  • If sharing that disk space via EXT2 or EXT3 is important to you, I recommend you use an OS that will make full use of the capabilities of that FS. Which no Windows OS will do.

    Beyond that, I can't tell you if what you want to do will work, as I haven't done it. Probably using vanilla Windows Server 2008 R2 will be a better starting point for you, since (as I said previously) you won't be able to manage your EXT2 volumes via the built in tools using Windows Home Server. At that point, you'll be back to basic OS functionality plus whatever you install from the desktop anyway.

    As for whether any given OS "has NAS capabilities", you will need to consult lists of product features for the various OSes to see if the particular features you want are either mentioned explicitly or implied by other features which are mentioned. 


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    • Marked as answer by Naemoor Wednesday, June 22, 2011 11:12 PM
    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 12:51 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you.

     

    I don't actually need the power of the LINUX Ext2-3 combo. I just need a vanilla partition for whop boughht media devices to record to.

     

    What I can tell you is that Microsoft does make a version of Windows Server called "Storage Server NAS" and is available as a build of Server 2008. However it is not available to buy or download as an MSDN member. It is available only via OEMs like Dell with their hugely expensive storage solutions

     

    Thank you for your time

     

    Ian


    For someone who's programming predates DOS, I really should have the hang of this by now
    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 11:11 PM