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Alerts available on the WHS website, (or any user created website) RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi All-

    Is there any way possible to make the alerts and warnings for the my WHS box to show up on the main page of the home server website?  Better yet, does anyone know of a way to simply turn the alerts into an rss feed (or something similar) that can be displayed on any website?

    I figure that this would mainly help because for those of us who can't get remote access working (thanks to my ISP blocking all ports SOMETIMES - yeah don't ask why), this could help.  I already have these alerts forwarded to my phone using remote alert and remote notification, but if this is something that someone could easily whip up, it would benefit many people (I think... if not, then it would certainly benefit myself).

    Thanks,
    -Kyle

    EDIT
    : I can't stand when others crosspost and not tell people.  So just so everyone knows, this post has been posted at the following:
    We Got Served Forums (direct link to post)
    Windows Home Server Forums (direct link to post)
    MSWHS Forums (direct link to post)
    MediaSmartServer.net Forums (direct link to post)
    • Edited by Not Kyle Saturday, April 18, 2009 2:05 PM
    Saturday, April 18, 2009 1:45 PM

Answers

  • You can't make them appear on the main page. They're visible in the console because that's the tool that the administrator of the server should use for normal server administrative tasks, including dealing with alerts. :)

    As for an RSS feed, you could always take a look at the Windows Home Server SDK . It's possible for an add-in or other software (such as a system service) to register to receive alerts; I imagine that you could then build/modify an RSS feed based on them if you  wanted to.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, April 18, 2009 2:01 PM
    Moderator
  • Add-Ins must be written using .NET and Visual Studio 2008 would be the logical choice to use. I think the developer forumat at we got served is one of the better places for information about developing add-ins: http://forum.wegotserved.com/index.php?s=20001504b77b70951ff74206fd49a643&showforum=22

    Developing the RSS add-in (or service) would be realatively straight forward. But since this is RSS we need a web page (aspx) hosted in IIS as well. Deploying this through the add-in is perhaps the tricky part.

    Microsoft has actually publised some code showing how to listen for health notifications. All you need to do is turn it into a service and push it out in RSS format via a http.
    See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/nb-no/library/dd172104(en-us).aspx
    HP MediaSmart EX475, 2GB ram, 2x512 + 1x120 GB storage. Author of WHS File Manager Add-In, WHS Jungle Disk Add-in and WHS Media Connect Configuration Add-in. http://blog.paks.no/whs-add-ins/
    Saturday, April 18, 2009 2:42 PM

All replies

  • You can't make them appear on the main page. They're visible in the console because that's the tool that the administrator of the server should use for normal server administrative tasks, including dealing with alerts. :)

    As for an RSS feed, you could always take a look at the Windows Home Server SDK . It's possible for an add-in or other software (such as a system service) to register to receive alerts; I imagine that you could then build/modify an RSS feed based on them if you  wanted to.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, April 18, 2009 2:01 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for the quick reply.  While I'm horrible at coding, I'll give it a try.  What's the worst that could happen.

    Also, what would you suggest to be a decent development program?  Would Visual Studio 2008 be what I'm looking for?
    Saturday, April 18, 2009 2:13 PM
  • Add-Ins must be written using .NET and Visual Studio 2008 would be the logical choice to use. I think the developer forumat at we got served is one of the better places for information about developing add-ins: http://forum.wegotserved.com/index.php?s=20001504b77b70951ff74206fd49a643&showforum=22

    Developing the RSS add-in (or service) would be realatively straight forward. But since this is RSS we need a web page (aspx) hosted in IIS as well. Deploying this through the add-in is perhaps the tricky part.

    Microsoft has actually publised some code showing how to listen for health notifications. All you need to do is turn it into a service and push it out in RSS format via a http.
    See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/nb-no/library/dd172104(en-us).aspx
    HP MediaSmart EX475, 2GB ram, 2x512 + 1x120 GB storage. Author of WHS File Manager Add-In, WHS Jungle Disk Add-in and WHS Media Connect Configuration Add-in. http://blog.paks.no/whs-add-ins/
    Saturday, April 18, 2009 2:42 PM
  • Since you would (probably) not want your alerts visible to the entire world, you would probably want to put them behind their own web application that participates in the Windows Home Server Remote Access authentication model. Creating the web application and deploying it through an add-in is fairly straightforward (you would need to include some supplemental scripts that would perform the required configuration as part of the installation), and the authentication requirements are documented in the SDK.

    I would recommend you test your development efforts on a machine other than your production server. "The worst that could happen" is probably a server reinstallation, which you'd prefer to avoid, I'm sure. I normally use a virtual machine for such testing...
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Saturday, April 18, 2009 2:52 PM
    Moderator
  • Add-Ins must be written using .NET and Visual Studio 2008 would be the logical choice to use. I think the developer forumat at we got served is one of the better places for information about developing add-ins: http://forum.wegotserved.com/index.php?s=20001504b77b70951ff74206fd49a643&showforum=22

    Developing the RSS add-in (or service) would be realatively straight forward. But since this is RSS we need a web page (aspx) hosted in IIS as well. Deploying this through the add-in is perhaps the tricky part.

    Microsoft has actually publised some code showing how to listen for health notifications. All you need to do is turn it into a service and push it out in RSS format via a http.
    See: http://msdn.microsoft.com/nb-no/library/dd172104(en-us).aspx
    HP MediaSmart EX475, 2GB ram, 2x512 + 1x120 GB storage. Author of WHS File Manager Add-In, WHS Jungle Disk Add-in and WHS Media Connect Configuration Add-in. http://blog.paks.no/whs-add-ins/
    I agree.  We got Served is my life, and I love that forum.  Thanks for the links  on how to do this.

    -Kyle
    Saturday, April 18, 2009 3:35 PM
  • Since you would (probably) not want your alerts visible to the entire world, you would probably want to put them behind their own web application that participates in the Windows Home Server Remote Access authentication model. Creating the web application and deploying it through an add-in is fairly straightforward (you would need to include some supplemental scripts that would perform the required configuration as part of the installation), and the authentication requirements are documented in the SDK.

    I would recommend you test your development efforts on a machine other than your production server. "The worst that could happen" is probably a server reinstallation, which you'd prefer to avoid, I'm sure. I normally use a virtual machine for such testing...
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Yes.  I had planned making them only available through the secure login portion of the WHS website.  I had planned to do this through a virtual machine, as the worst that could happen is reverting to a save state.  Thanks for the additional info.

    -Kyle
    Saturday, April 18, 2009 3:38 PM