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  • Question

  • Hello,
     
    I am interested in getting into an IT career. I currently do not have any experience but I am thinking about taking a "dialer" position at work to get my foot in the door. They work with a predictive dialer system for the call center and work with IT in a small capacity. I feel this would be a good way for me to get some experience since it is similar to a desktop support position.

    I have been interested in computers since I was 12 or so and have messed around with them since then. I am now 26 and really want to get a career going. Ultimately I want to be a software engineer and maybe move into a systems analyst position. Who knows from there. Right now I want to see where the best place to start would be. So, I am looking to get some certifications. I wanted to know the best place to start to get me ready for tech support of some kind until I finish my bachelors degree - which I have about 1 1/2 years to go. I am learning a lot in school but I have nothing to show for it on my resume as far as a degree or experience.

    Any advise is greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.
    Thursday, July 3, 2008 1:20 AM

Answers

  • kmcferrin said:

    If your goal is to become a software engineer then I would probably avoid getting a job in support.  While both jobs are in the extremely wide-ranging and vaguely titled "IT Field," they aren't really that related.  If you are going to school for computer science or some other degree related to software development then I would recommend that you continue on that path.  Try to find internships or junior developer positions that would complement your course work.



    This is a great approach, brandy, so definitely have a look at kmcferrin's approach to your career.

    The other thing that I would add to this is that you should also go after short term and contract work if you have significant informal experience with development.  Often the bar to hire for these kinds of positions, if you have any experience at all, is much lower than for a full analyst or other position.  Contractors often have to accept lower quality candidates because the benefits and the job security are sub-par for the industry.  Those with more considerable skills and experience are going to go for better or more stable positions.

    Don't be afraid to take contract work as you are going to hae the opportunity to build your experience in the position.  At the same time, make sure that you are at least comfortable in being able to address the needs of any role that you apply to. 

    If you do not feel that you can yet develop at a professional level as even a junior or contract developer, I would say that you need to put a stronger focus on building your experience through either formal training or an internship rather than directly enter the industry right now.

    Tech support, and particularly being a "dialer", is going to do nothing for you in getting into software engineering.  For hiring manager, saying I was an IT help desk representative when you are going for a programming position is equated slightly above McDonalds and slightly below button-pushing-monkey.  (For those looking in IT as a network administrator, it is the first rung of the building curve of experience, and hence looked at differently for an engineer/administrator who is getting thier start with support and administration.)
    - Wayne S. Anderson MCITP, MCSE, MCT http://blog.avanadeadvisor.com/blogs/waynea
    Thursday, July 3, 2008 5:38 PM
  • I would first start by reviewing this thread: http://forums.community.microsoft.com/en-US/CertGeneral/thread/4cecd8c8-d791-4e3f-951b-a15575712769. Peter asked a similiar question and there is some good advice there to start out with. :)


    Michael D. Alligood, MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+ www.theitclassroom.com
    Thursday, July 3, 2008 1:32 AM

All replies

  • I would first start by reviewing this thread: http://forums.community.microsoft.com/en-US/CertGeneral/thread/4cecd8c8-d791-4e3f-951b-a15575712769. Peter asked a similiar question and there is some good advice there to start out with. :)


    Michael D. Alligood, MCITP, MCTS, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, A+, Network+ www.theitclassroom.com
    Thursday, July 3, 2008 1:32 AM
  • Perfect, thank you. I will take a look. :)
    Thursday, July 3, 2008 2:36 AM
  • If your goal is to become a software engineer then I would probably avoid getting a job in support.  While both jobs are in the extremely wide-ranging and vaguely titled "IT Field," they aren't really that related.  If you are going to school for computer science or some other degree related to software development then I would recommend that you continue on that path.  Try to find internships or junior developer positions that would complement your course work.
    Thursday, July 3, 2008 4:52 PM
  • kmcferrin said:

    If your goal is to become a software engineer then I would probably avoid getting a job in support.  While both jobs are in the extremely wide-ranging and vaguely titled "IT Field," they aren't really that related.  If you are going to school for computer science or some other degree related to software development then I would recommend that you continue on that path.  Try to find internships or junior developer positions that would complement your course work.



    This is a great approach, brandy, so definitely have a look at kmcferrin's approach to your career.

    The other thing that I would add to this is that you should also go after short term and contract work if you have significant informal experience with development.  Often the bar to hire for these kinds of positions, if you have any experience at all, is much lower than for a full analyst or other position.  Contractors often have to accept lower quality candidates because the benefits and the job security are sub-par for the industry.  Those with more considerable skills and experience are going to go for better or more stable positions.

    Don't be afraid to take contract work as you are going to hae the opportunity to build your experience in the position.  At the same time, make sure that you are at least comfortable in being able to address the needs of any role that you apply to. 

    If you do not feel that you can yet develop at a professional level as even a junior or contract developer, I would say that you need to put a stronger focus on building your experience through either formal training or an internship rather than directly enter the industry right now.

    Tech support, and particularly being a "dialer", is going to do nothing for you in getting into software engineering.  For hiring manager, saying I was an IT help desk representative when you are going for a programming position is equated slightly above McDonalds and slightly below button-pushing-monkey.  (For those looking in IT as a network administrator, it is the first rung of the building curve of experience, and hence looked at differently for an engineer/administrator who is getting thier start with support and administration.)
    - Wayne S. Anderson MCITP, MCSE, MCT http://blog.avanadeadvisor.com/blogs/waynea
    Thursday, July 3, 2008 5:38 PM
  • Thank you all for the advice. I will possibly look into a junior developer position, or maybe even an internship. I will research further, thank you for the clarification. :)
    • Proposed as answer by Jason_Degoss Sunday, November 22, 2015 4:56 PM
    Friday, July 4, 2008 12:19 AM