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Windows 7 VM's not Genuine? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Odd, the message hasn't come back in close to 24 hours. I'll post a new report if it pops back up.

    Background:

    have 2 TechNet keys that I originally used on VMs. Killed those, built a new VM about a year ago, re-used one key.  Everything was fine up until Sunday night when the "not genuine" popped up. Changed key back to itself, and it authenticated fine, but message came back.  Changed to other key, that authenticated fine, but message came back. Chatted with Partner Network and TechNet support, and TechNet support said that both keys were valid and fine, they pointed me to this forum. I posted up, changed key back, and it's been fine since? Go figure. Crossing my fingers.

    Wednesday, April 10, 2013 11:20 PM

Answers

  • I believe I have resolved the problem with VMware. Initially I created a minimal VM with just Windows 7 on it, then copied the folder for that to make another identical VM machine.   Doiing this means you don’t have to create a whole new VM from scratch, reinstalling Windows.    When you open the new VM with the VM Player it asks you to select “I moved it” or “I copied it.”   Since I was creating a new VM, I selected “I copied it”, which seems like the logical choice.  It turns out that is the wrong choice.  You should select “I moved it”.  What this selection is really asking is whether the new VM is on the same computer (I moved it) or on another computer (I copied it.)   The reason this is important is because if you select “I moved it” the new VM is set up with the same simulated bios id and Ethernet address as the original VM, so activation is not triggered.  If you select “I copied it” then the new VM is set up with a different bios id and Ethernet address, and that triggers reactivation.

    So then the question was how to fix up the existing VMs.   This is how I did it:   Close all VMs. Using notepad open the .vmx file for the original working VM.  Using a second instance of notepad open the .vmx file for the VM that is reporting it is not genuine.   Copy the values from the file for the original to the file for the problem VM:

                    uuid.bios

                    uuid.location

                    scsio.SASWWID

                    ethernet0.generatedAddress

    Now start the problem VM and it will ask you the question again and this time say “I moved it”.   (I believe the uuid.location value is used to determine if the files have been physically moved.  By setting the uuid.location to the original value VMWare detects you are now in a different location and asks the question again.)


    Robert Walraven, Multiware Inc.

    Sunday, December 22, 2013 12:42 AM

All replies

  • I'm also having the same problem.   Two weeks ago I installed VMware Player machines on a new computer.  The host and the VMs all have Windows 7 installed.   I am an Action Pack subscriber and downloaded Windows 7 from my account.   Suddenly two days ago all VMs started giving the "not genuine" message.   I have not been able to find anything to get around this problem.  I contacted a friend tonight who has a similar setup with VMware Workstation and she started having the same problem on her VMs about the same time.

    Saturday, December 21, 2013 6:56 AM
  • Please post MGADiag reports of the guest systems.

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
    CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    No - I do not work for Microsoft, or any of its contractors.

    Saturday, December 21, 2013 9:15 AM
    Moderator
  • Microsoft is retiring the TechNet Subscription program.  Perhaps your subscription has expired.  Please review: TechNet Subscriptions

    Carey Frisch

    Saturday, December 21, 2013 5:13 PM
    Moderator
  • I believe I have resolved the problem with VMware. Initially I created a minimal VM with just Windows 7 on it, then copied the folder for that to make another identical VM machine.   Doiing this means you don’t have to create a whole new VM from scratch, reinstalling Windows.    When you open the new VM with the VM Player it asks you to select “I moved it” or “I copied it.”   Since I was creating a new VM, I selected “I copied it”, which seems like the logical choice.  It turns out that is the wrong choice.  You should select “I moved it”.  What this selection is really asking is whether the new VM is on the same computer (I moved it) or on another computer (I copied it.)   The reason this is important is because if you select “I moved it” the new VM is set up with the same simulated bios id and Ethernet address as the original VM, so activation is not triggered.  If you select “I copied it” then the new VM is set up with a different bios id and Ethernet address, and that triggers reactivation.

    So then the question was how to fix up the existing VMs.   This is how I did it:   Close all VMs. Using notepad open the .vmx file for the original working VM.  Using a second instance of notepad open the .vmx file for the VM that is reporting it is not genuine.   Copy the values from the file for the original to the file for the problem VM:

                    uuid.bios

                    uuid.location

                    scsio.SASWWID

                    ethernet0.generatedAddress

    Now start the problem VM and it will ask you the question again and this time say “I moved it”.   (I believe the uuid.location value is used to determine if the files have been physically moved.  By setting the uuid.location to the original value VMWare detects you are now in a different location and asks the question again.)


    Robert Walraven, Multiware Inc.

    Sunday, December 22, 2013 12:42 AM
  • That seems like a reasonable solution :) - well done!


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi
    CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    No - I do not work for Microsoft, or any of its contractors.

    Sunday, December 22, 2013 10:41 AM
    Moderator