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  • Question

  • What's the best model for a WHS? I was looking at a WD Caviar Green. Is it reliable enough for home server use?
    • Moved by Ken WarrenModerator Thursday, July 8, 2010 1:32 PM hardware question (From:Windows Home Server Code Name "Vail" Beta)
    Thursday, July 8, 2010 12:58 PM

All replies

  • I would recommend staying away from the Advanced Format Drives from WD at this time.  The non Advanced Format Drives perform perfectly, at least for me.  Usually, the Advanced Format Drives can be recognized by the letter "R" in the model number, i.e, W15EARS.  However, the previous model, W15EADS works with no problems.
     
    For all the details, I would suggest reading the info in the following links to include info that is linked in them.
     
     
     

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    BulllDawg
    In God We Trust
     
    What's the best model for a WHS? I was looking at a WD Caviar Green. Is it reliable enough for home server use?

    BullDawg
    Thursday, July 8, 2010 1:37 PM
  • You want a drive that doesn't include Western Digital's Time Limited Error Recovery (TLER) feature. TLER keeps a drive from entering an extended error recovery attempt, which is good in a RAID array (with a controller that handles error recovery well) because the extended recovery phase will result in the drive "dropping out" of the array. By letting the controller handle error recovery, you get better reliability and uptime from your arrays. (Note that your typical motherboard RAID controller is probably not a good candidate for TLER drives; error recovery is somewhat rudimentary.) Other manufacturers have similar technologies, and the same caveats tend to apply.

    WD Green drives should be fine, though Bulldawg's note is also correct. If the drive is an advanced format drive and it's intended for use in the storage pool, use the jumper before you install it.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, July 8, 2010 1:39 PM
    Moderator
  • Agreed.

    I'm using WD Caviar Green 2 TB SATA Hard Drives ( WD20EACS ) and have had no problems with WHS v1 and Vail.

    Review here: http://usingwindowshomeserver.com/2009/07/31/review-of-the-wd-caviar-green-2tb-sata-hard-drive/

     

    However there are lots of reports of workarounds needed with the EARS version e.g. here:

    http://forum.wegotserved.com/index.php?/topic/11681-wd-green-2tb-drives-should-we-use-wd-align/

    Sam

     

     

    Thursday, July 8, 2010 1:44 PM
  • What's the best model for a WHS? I was looking at a WD Caviar Green. Is it reliable enough for home server use?

    My notes below are based on my use of WHS Vail. If you're using WHS v1, you may be able to safely ignore what I've written, but it might prove useful to others using Vail.

    BullDawg's first link in turn has a link to an article here:

    http://www.wegotserved.com/2010/01/31/forum-focus-western-digital-advanced-format-drives-and-windows-home-server/

    There are a couple of things I gleaned from this report:

    • The issue is that only Windows 6.x operating systems and above (that’s Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 ) have in-box support for the new technology , whilst older operating systems which aren’t aware of the tech are likely to have poor default performance from these drives due to alignment issues.
    • For now, your safest bet is to avoid the new Western Digital Advanced Format drives with Windows Home Server until a full resolution can be found. With WHS v2 being based on Windows Server 2008 R2 , it should not be affected by this problem.

    I have 3 WD20EARS (2TB) loaded in my Vail box and haven't experienced any problems with the drives being recognized. I used no jumpers before installing. Vail recognized them right away and using the utility to add a drive, I was able to rename them, format, and add them to the server storage pool.

    Friday, July 9, 2010 5:46 PM
  • Well, it doesn't have to be a WD at all. That was just what I had on my mind because the WD Caviar Green drives are cheap for mass storage. If there's a cost-effective, hassle-free solution from another maker, I'm more than open.
    Saturday, July 10, 2010 1:25 AM