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Batch Files RRS feed

  • Question

  • There had been a lot of questions and queries regarding the Batch files.. So here i start a thread for discussing more on the batch files...
    Post some of your batch files, questions and help other learn more from it..

    Also there can be a lot of manipulation done regarding batch files, though i dont know them i intend to study them....
    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 6:37 PM

Answers

  • We were discussing more on this code...


    Code Snippet

    @ echo off
    :start
    Echo "Press 1 to execute batch1.bat"
    Echo "Press 3 to execute batch3.bat"
    Echo "Press 4 to execute batch4.bat"
    Echo "Press 7 to Execute Batch7.bat"
    Echo "Press q to Quit"

    choice /c:1347q /T:q,15 "Select Choice"

    If errorlevel==5 goto quit
    If errorlevel==4 goto bat7
    If errorlevel==3 goto bat4
    If errorlevel==2 goto bat3
    If errorlevel==1 goto bat1


    :bat1
    call batch1
    goto start

    :bat3
    call batch3
    goto start

    :bat4
    call batch4
    goto start

    :bat7
    Echo Seventh Batch File
    del count.txt
    call batch7
    goto start

    :quit
    Echo Sorry, you could not chain to any batchfile


    Try to understand how choice works and post your queries here...
    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 6:43 PM
  • i have a whole article based on creating a batch file..

     

    Do you want me to provide that?

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 11:06 PM
  • @ Akshat - yes post it man.. Upload it in Rapidshare and give us the link to download it man...
    Thursday, May 31, 2007 1:07 AM
  • Yes upload the article and we will discuss more on it...
    Thursday, May 31, 2007 3:58 AM

All replies

  • We were discussing more on this code...


    Code Snippet

    @ echo off
    :start
    Echo "Press 1 to execute batch1.bat"
    Echo "Press 3 to execute batch3.bat"
    Echo "Press 4 to execute batch4.bat"
    Echo "Press 7 to Execute Batch7.bat"
    Echo "Press q to Quit"

    choice /c:1347q /T:q,15 "Select Choice"

    If errorlevel==5 goto quit
    If errorlevel==4 goto bat7
    If errorlevel==3 goto bat4
    If errorlevel==2 goto bat3
    If errorlevel==1 goto bat1


    :bat1
    call batch1
    goto start

    :bat3
    call batch3
    goto start

    :bat4
    call batch4
    goto start

    :bat7
    Echo Seventh Batch File
    del count.txt
    call batch7
    goto start

    :quit
    Echo Sorry, you could not chain to any batchfile


    Try to understand how choice works and post your queries here...
    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 6:43 PM
  • i have a whole article based on creating a batch file..

     

    Do you want me to provide that?

    Wednesday, May 30, 2007 11:06 PM
  • @ Akshat - yes post it man.. Upload it in Rapidshare and give us the link to download it man...
    Thursday, May 31, 2007 1:07 AM
  • Yes upload the article and we will discuss more on it...
    Thursday, May 31, 2007 3:58 AM
  • What happened people, I thought people were interested in Batch files...
    Friday, June 1, 2007 4:30 AM
  • I created a lot of batch  files when i was in BCA for my fun purpose. also created a small batch script to fool people and get their pass of novel Stick out tongue

    Ill try to search for it, if find it, ill post it here. Till then ill also find some more info about advance batch scripts.
    Friday, June 1, 2007 3:09 PM
  • Yup, that will be nice to know how to make some tricky batch files, so do let me know...

    you were asking about the choice cmd....

    well the syntax is
    choice /c:-------------    /t:--,--
                   Choices             default
                                           1st default choice, 2nd the default time,
    so when the batch file pauses for the users input, you can have a default choice, which will be automatically selected after the default time is over..., time is in seconds only.... you can give 1 to 90...

    Now answer this, when you use error level after a choice cmd, does the order of the errorlevel play any role???
    Friday, June 1, 2007 5:13 PM
  • I dont know about hwo choice command actually work, but i know how errorlevel works in the batch file. This one is easy to answer.

    the error level thing works in reverse order, like a stack, all the errors are pushed onto the stack, so while comparing the errorlevel, you have to check it in the reverse order in which the error occoured.
    Friday, June 1, 2007 5:44 PM
  • Well that is not the answer i expected, anyways, I will tell you how the choice cmd works...

    Well when we select one of the given options
    i.e. choice /c:--------

    The computer throughs an error level, like for the 1st choice character 0, for 2nd 1, so on....
    Then the comparison is made, but it is not the equality that is being checked,
    dos checks, less than equal to condition,
    So if the error level thrown is 2 and you have errorlevel 1 before, it will get triggered,
    So we check the condition with the highest level 1st...

    So, Dos makes a less than equal to comparison and not only equality,
    This was also used somewhere else but i dont remember it rite now...
    Friday, June 1, 2007 6:04 PM
  • Thanks for clearing it out varun. I thought Dos used stack to store the error levels, so that was the reason why we had to check for the highest error number first.

    Thanks for the explanation.
    Friday, June 1, 2007 6:40 PM
  • Code Snippet
    rem  This batch file gets a character or word of user input and 
    rem returns it in the environment variable VALUE. Two tricks are
    rem used to accomplish this:
    rem
    rem (1) The FC (File Compare) command is used to compare two standard
    rem devices -- NUL (nothing) and CON (the console). The /LB1 option
    rem is used to insure only one line is compared, and the /N numbers
    rem that output line with a "1:", making it easier for us to find.
    rem FC will output immediately after the user hits "Enter" (because
    rem of the /LB1), and will give us a total of 7 lines of output.
    rem Of these 7 lines, the one starting with "1:" is the one we want.
    rem
    rem (2) The DATE command is used only because it always returns the
    rem phrase "Enter new date (mm-dd-yy): " followed by whatever was
    rem piped into it. Why is this format important? Obviously, it
    rem has nothing to do with setting the date! Well, we will be
    rem piping it into a batch file and running it. When that batch
    rem file runs, it will try to execute the first word (Enter) as if
    rem it were a valid command, and pass everything else as arguments.
    rem Since we have created a valid (batch file) command called ENTER,
    rem this will actually work! We just have to make sure that ENTER.BAT
    rem is set up to handle the arguments that will be passed to it!


    echo This is a test. Please enter "y" or "n"
    fc con nul /lb1 /n | date | find "1:" > en#er.bat
    echo set value=%%5> enter.bat
    call en#er.bat
    del en?er.bat > nul
    if "%value%"=="n" echo You entered "n"
    if "%value%"=="y" echo You entered "y"
    set value=

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:13 PM

  • Code Snippet

    @echo off
    :: This batch file will create a web page, then use
    :: Visual Basic Scripting and the Windows Scripting Host
    :: to launch Internet Explorer to show that page.
    :: Values entered in the web page will be read via
    :: scripting, then will be saved as %TEMP%\USERIN.BAT
    :: After the USERIN.BAT is CALLed from the main batch
    :: (and assuming there is enough room in the environment)
    :: environmental variables USERNAME and PASSWORD will be set.
    :: It is your responsibility to delete the USERIN.BAT
    :: after you CALL it. Because this batch file needs to
    :: find itself, you must be sure to call it from your
    :: main batch file with a full path and file name.
    :: Written and tested under Win95. NT/2000/XP users will
    :: have to do some modifications before it will work.
    :: For example, %0 changes to %f0



    cls
    echo Please enter your user name and password in the entry box...
    :: See if I can find myself
    If not exist %0 goto ERROR
    :: Make the web page
    type %0 | find " " | find /v " " | find /v "Not Me!" > %TEMP%\UserIn.htm
    :: Make the VBS code
    type %0 | find " " | find /v " " | find /v "Not Me!" > %TEMP%\UserIn.vbs
    :: Run the vbs code
    start /w wscript.exe %TEMP%\UserIn.vbs
    :: At this point a batch file "%TEMP%\UserIn.bat" exists and you should
    :: call it! If you don't call the batch file here and instead opt to
    :: call it from another batch file, be sure NOT to delete it in the
    :: "Clean up" code section below!
    call %TEMP%\UserIn.bat
    echo Your user name is %USERNAME%
    echo Your password is %PASSWORD%
    :: Clean up
    del %TEMP%\UserIn.vbs
    del %TEMP%\UserIn.htm
    del %TEMP%\UserIn.bat
    goto DONE

    :ERROR
    cls
    echo %0 is not the full path and file name
    echo for the batch file. You MUST call this
    echo batch file with a full path and file name.
    goto DONE

    :HTML
    :: All HTML code MUST be indented exactly four spaces.
    :: NOTHING else in this batch file may be indented four spaces.
    <html><body><form>User Name:
    <br><input type=text name=username tabindex=1>
    <br>Password:
    <br><input type=password name=password>
    <br><input type=button
    language=vbscript name=submit
    value=OK onclick='submit.value="Done"'>
    </form></body></html>

    :VBS
    :: All VBS code MUST be indented exactly five spaces.
    :: NOTHING else in this batch file may be indented five spaces.
    Set fs = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    strFile = fs.GetAbsolutePathName(fs.BuildPath(fs.GetSpecialFolder(2), "UserIn.htm"))
    Set web = CreateObject("InternetExplorer.Application")
    web.Offline = True
    web.AddressBar = False
    web.Height = 200
    web.Width = 250
    web.MenuBar = False
    web.StatusBar = False
    web.Silent = True
    web.ToolBar = False
    web.Navigate strFile
    Do While web.Busy
    Loop
    On Error Resume Next
    Set doc = Nothing
    Do Until Not doc Is Nothing
    Set doc = web.Document
    Loop
    doc.Forms(0).elements("username").focus
    web.Visible = True
    Err.Clear
    Do Until doc.Forms(0).elements("submit").Value <> "OK"
    Wscript.Sleep 100
    If Err.Number <> 0 Then Exit Do
    Loop
    strFile = fs.GetAbsolutePathName(fs.BuildPath(fs.GetSpecialFolder(2), "UserIn.bat"))
    Set ts = fs.OpenTextFile(strFile, 2, True)
    ts.WriteLine "SET USERNAME=" & doc.Forms(0).elements("username").Value
    ts.WriteLine "SET PASSWORD=" & doc.Forms(0).elements("password").Value
    ts.Close
    web.Quit

    :DONE

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:14 PM

  • Code Snippet

    @echo off
    :: This batch file will create an HTML Application (HTA).
    :: Values entered in the HTA will be saved as %TEMP%\USERIN.BAT
    :: After the USERIN.BAT is CALLed from the main batch
    :: (and assuming there is enough room in the environment)
    :: environmental variables USERNAME and PASSWORD will be set.
    :: It is your responsibility to delete the USERIN.BAT
    :: after you CALL it. Because this batch file needs to
    :: find itself, you must be sure to call it from your
    :: main batch file with a full path and file name.
    :: Written and tested under Win95. NT/2000/XP users will
    :: have to do some modifications before it will work.
    :: For example, %0 changes to %f0

    cls
    echo Please enter your user name and password in the entry box...
    :: See if I can find myself
    If not exist %0 goto ERROR
    :: Make the web page
    type %0 | find "    " | find /v "Not Me!" > %TEMP%\UserIn.hta
    :: Run the vbs code
    start /w %TEMP%\UserIn.hta
    :: At this point a batch file "%TEMP%\UserIn.bat" exists and you should
    :: call it! If you don't call the batch file here and instead opt to
    :: call it from another batch file, be sure NOT to delete it in the
    :: "Clean up" code section below!
    call %TEMP%\UserIn.bat
    echo Your user name is %USERNAME%
    echo Your password is %PASSWORD%
    :: Clean up
    del %TEMP%\UserIn.hta
    del %TEMP%\UserIn.bat
    goto DONE

    :ERROR
    cls
    echo %0 is not the full path and file name
    echo for the batch file. You MUST call this
    echo batch file with a full path and file name.
    goto DONE

    :HTA
    :: All HTA code MUST be indented four or more spaces.
    :: NOTHING else in this batch file may be indented four spaces.
        <html>
        <head>
        <title>Password Entry</title>
        <hta:application>
        <script language="vbscript">
            window.resizeTo 250,200
            Sub SaveBatch()
                Set fs = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
                strFile = fs.GetAbsolutePathName(fs.BuildPath(fs.GetSpecialFolder(2), "UserIn.bat"))
                Set ts = fs.OpenTextFile(strFile, 2, True)
                ts.WriteLine "SET USERNAME=" & document.Forms(0).elements("username").value
                ts.WriteLine "SET PASSWORD=" & document.Forms(0).elements("password").value
                ts.Close
            End Sub
        </script>
        </head>
        <body>
        <form>
            User Name:
            <br><input type=text name=username tabindex=1>
            <br>Password:
            <br><input type=password name=password>
            <br><input type=button language="vbscript" value="OK"
            onclick="SaveBatch : Window.Close">
        </form>
        <script language=vbscript>
            document.Forms(0).elements("username").focus
        </script>
        </body>
        </html>

    :DONE
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:15 PM
  • Code Snippet

    @echo off
    :: This batch file will create a QBASIC script which
    :: will allow you to enter a password while only displaying
    :: asterisks. It will then create a batch file named
    :: "%TEMP%\USERIN.BAT" After the USERIN.BAT is CALLed from
    :: the main batch (and assuming there is enough room in the
    :: environment) the environmental variable PASSWORD will be
    :: set. Because this batch file needs to find itself,
    :: you must be sure to call it from your main batch
    :: file with a full path and file name. One line below
    :: should be modified for Win9x versus NT:
    :: Win9x code:
    :: qbasic.exe /run %TEMP%\UserIn.bas
    :: NT code:
    :: start /b /wait /shared qbasic.exe /run %TEMP%\UserIn.bas


    cls
    If not exist %0 goto ERROR
    :: Make the QBASIC script
    type %0 | find "    " | find /v "Not Me!" > %TEMP%\UserIn.bas
    :: Run the script
    start /b /wait /shared qbasic.exe /run %TEMP%\UserIn.bas
    :: Run the batch file created by the QBASIC script
    call %TEMP%\UserIn.bat
    :: Delete the created files
    del %TEMP%\UserIn.bas
    del %TEMP%\UserIn.bat
    echo.
    echo Your password is %PASSWORD%
    pause
    goto DONE

    :ERROR
    cls
    echo %0 is not the full path and file name
    echo for the batch file. You MUST call this
    echo batch file with a full path and file name.
    goto DONE

    :QBASIC
    :: All QBASIC code MUST be indented four or more spaces.
    :: NOTHING else in this batch file may be indented four spaces.
        DIM strPassword AS STRING
        DIM strKey AS STRING
        CLS
        PRINT "Please enter your password:"
        LOCATE CSRLIN, POS(0), 1
        strKey = ""
        DO UNTIL strKey = CHR$(13)
          IF strKey = CHR$(8) THEN
            IF strPassword <> "" THEN
              strPassword = LEFT$(strPassword, LEN(strPassword) - 1)
              LOCATE CSRLIN, POS(0) - 1, 1
              PRINT " ";
              LOCATE CSRLIN, POS(0) - 1, 1
            END IF
          ELSE
            strPassword = strPassword + strKey
            IF strKey <> "" THEN PRINT "*";
          END IF
          strKey = INPUT$(1)
        LOOP
        OPEN ENVIRON$("TEMP") + "\USERIN.BAT" FOR OUTPUT AS #1
        PRINT #1, "SET PASSWORD=" + strPassword
        CLOSE #1
        SYSTEM

    :DONE


    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:16 PM

  • Code Snippet

       Getting user input with NT can be a problem
       because most user input routines use the CON
       and NUL device. NT, unfortunately, doesn't handle
       these devices as files (like Win95 and DOS do).
       Luckily, NT comes standard with QBASIC! Shown
       here is a way to create a simple QBASIC program
       that takes the user input and creates a temporary
       batch file. When the batch file is run, an
       environmental variable is set containing the
       user input.

    ---------------------------------------------------
    @echo off
    echo OPEN "~usrin.bat" FOR OUTPUT AS #1> ~usrin.bas
    echo INPUT "Enter your name ", sUsrin$>> ~usrin.bas
    echo PRINT #1, "set usrin="; sUsrin$>> ~usrin.bas
    echo CLOSE #1>> ~usrin.bas
    echo SYSTEM>> ~usrin.bas
    qbasic /run ~usrin.bas
    call ~usrin.bat
    del ~usrin.bat
    del ~usrin.bas
    echo Your name is %usrin%
    pause
    cls
    ---------------------------------------------------

        I've had scattered reports that the above code
        doesn't run on code page 437 (US) but works
        on code page 850 (Multilingual). But I use
        code page 437, and the code works identically
        for me under Win95 and NT4. Just FYI.

        Eric Rose, someone who knows NT better than I
        do, found that if you have problems with
        QBASIC using expanded memory in ways NT
        finds unacceptable, you can make everybody
        happy by adding this line

    ---------------------------------------------------
    set RTVMEXP=0
    ---------------------------------------------------

        to the beginning of the batch file (actually
        the second line, just after the "@echo off"
        line).

        In the above example, I create the QBASIC
        code as it is needed. You can speed things up
        considerably by creating the code ahead of time
        and having it kept as a permanent item. Here is
        the code rewritten as two separate files.
        First, the batch file:

    ---------------------------------------------------
    @echo off
    qbasic /run userin.bas
    call ~userin.bat
    del ~userin.bat
    echo Your name is %userin%
    ---------------------------------------------------

        Now the QBASIC file I call "USERIN.BAS"

    ---------------------------------------------------
    OPEN "~userin.bat" FOR OUTPUT AS #1
    INPUT "Enter your name ", sUsrin$
    PRINT #1, "set userin="; sUsrin$
    CLOSE #1
    SYSTEM
    ---------------------------------------------------

        If you've kept your service packs up to date,
        you got the Windows Scripting Host installed
        when SP4 came out. If you have scripting,
        this batch file should provide you with
        another prettier alternative:

    ---------------------------------------------------
    @echo off
     > ~userin.vbs echo strUserIn = InputBox("Enter Data")
    >> ~userin.vbs echo Set fs = Wscript.CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    >> ~userin.vbs echo strFileName = fs.BuildPath(Wscript.ScriptFullName ^& "\..", "~userin.bat")
    >> ~userin.vbs echo strFileName = fs.GetAbsolutePathName(strFileName)
    >> ~userin.vbs echo Set ts = fs.OpenTextFile(strFileName, 2, True)
    >> ~userin.vbs echo ts.WriteLine "set userin=" ^& strUserIn
    >> ~userin.vbs echo ts.Close
    start /w wscript.exe ~userin.vbs
    del ~userin.vbs
    call ~userin.bat
    del ~userin.bat
    echo You entered %USERIN%
    ---------------------------------------------------

        Again, here is the above scripting version rewritten
        as two separate files. First the batch file:

    ---------------------------------------------------
    start /w wscript.exe userin.vbs
    call ~userin.bat
    del ~userin.bat
    echo You entered %USERIN%
    ---------------------------------------------------

        Now the script file I call "userin.vbs"

    ---------------------------------------------------
    strUserIn = InputBox("Enter Data")
    Set fs = Wscript.CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    strFileName = fs.BuildPath(Wscript.ScriptFullName & "\..", "~userin.bat")
    strFileName = fs.GetAbsolutePathName(strFileName)
    Set ts = fs.OpenTextFile(strFileName, 2, True)
    ts.WriteLine "set userin=" & strUserIn
    ts.Close
    ---------------------------------------------------

        While the "two separate files" version
        above will run on any machine (so far)
        that has scripting, the single file
        version I showed only works on NT.
        That's because the ampersand has special
        meaning under NT. When the batch file
        tries to "echo" a "&" character, NT
        requires that a caret precede it:

    ---------------------------------------------------
    >> ~userin.vbs echo ts.WriteLine "set userin=" ^& strUserIn
    ---------------------------------------------------

        The same line written for a Win9x machine would be:

    ---------------------------------------------------
    >> ~userin.vbs echo ts.WriteLine "set userin=" & strUserIn
    ---------------------------------------------------

        If you have to write code that works
        on both machines, you can test for the
        behavior (which is safer than testing
        for the OS). Here is code that will run
        on NT and Win9x:

    ---------------------------------------------------
    @echo off
    :: This batch file illustrates how to create and run a script
    :: file from a batch file. This uses scripting to solve the
    :: common "How do I get user input" problem. This should work on
    :: Win9x and NT boxes as long as they have scripting installed!

    :: First test to see if we are on NT or similar OS
    :: The ony difference is how they handle the ampersand
     > ~userin.vbs echo 1234&rem
    type ~userin.vbs | find "rem" > nul
    if errorlevel 1 goto WINNT
    goto WIN9X

    :WIN9X
     > ~userin.vbs echo strUserIn = InputBox("Enter Data")
    >> ~userin.vbs echo Set fs = Wscript.CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    >> ~userin.vbs echo strFileName = fs.BuildPath(Wscript.ScriptFullName & "\..", "~userin.bat")
    >> ~userin.vbs echo strFileName = fs.GetAbsolutePathName(strFileName)
    >> ~userin.vbs echo Set ts = fs.OpenTextFile(strFileName, 2, True)
    >> ~userin.vbs echo ts.WriteLine "set userin=" & strUserIn
    >> ~userin.vbs echo ts.Close
    goto RUN

    :WINNT
     > ~userin.vbs echo strUserIn = InputBox("Enter Data")
    >> ~userin.vbs echo Set fs = Wscript.CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
    >> ~userin.vbs echo strFileName = fs.BuildPath(Wscript.ScriptFullName ^& "\..", "~userin.bat")
    >> ~userin.vbs echo strFileName = fs.GetAbsolutePathName(strFileName)
    >> ~userin.vbs echo Set ts = fs.OpenTextFile(strFileName, 2, True)
    >> ~userin.vbs echo ts.WriteLine "set userin=" ^& strUserIn
    >> ~userin.vbs echo ts.Close
    goto RUN

    :RUN
    :: Now run the created script
    start /w wscript.exe ~userin.vbs
    del ~userin.vbs

    :: Now call the created batch file
    call ~userin.bat
    del ~userin.bat

    :: Now display the data!
    echo You entered %USERIN%
    pause
    cls
    ---------------------------------------------------



    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:17 PM
  • Code Snippet

    @echo off
    :: The batch file I wanted to write required a number of optional parameters in
    :: any sequence, the only way I could figure out which ones were which was to
    :: include a label before the parameter.  The following batch file shows how
    :: this is implemented:
    :: name: ARGUMENTS.BAT
    :: parameters:
    :: -c <c name>    The cname parm
    :: -s <s name>    The sname parm
    :: -u <u name>    The uname parm
    :: note a maximum of 3 parameters

    :initial
    if "%1"=="-c" goto lcname
    if "%1"=="-s" goto lsname
    if "%1"=="-u" goto luname
    if "%1"=="" goto print
    goto error

    :lcname
    shift
    set cname=%1
    goto lreturn

    :lsname
    shift
    set sname=%1
    goto lreturn

    :luname
    shift
    set uname=%1

    :lreturn
    shift
    call arguments.bat %1 %2 %3 %4 %5 %6
    goto done

    :error
    echo %0 usage error
    goto done

    :print
    echo cname = %cname%
    echo sname = %sname%
    echo uname = %uname%

    :done

    :: Note from Eric Phelps
    ::
    :: In addition to solving Simon's problem of handling
    :: arguments in any order, the above batch file demonstrates
    :: recursiveness (getting a program to re-run itself)
    :: and subroutines (not obvious, but the way it is implemented
    :: above by jumping to a label and then leaving is as close
    :: as we can come in the batch world). See another example of
    :: subroutines here:
    :: http://www.ericphelps.com/batch/samples/subsdemo.bat.txt
    :: The down side of these techniques is that they require
    :: the batch file to be able to find itself. Notice the "call"
    :: line in the "lreturn" code section. It has to have the name
    :: (and preferably the path too) of the batch file. This means
    :: if you rename the batch file, you must recode that line.
    :: This is no problem if you write the batch file for yourself.
    :: You'll know the name and path. But -- if you give the batch
    :: file to someone else (like we are doing here!), they might
    :: give it a different name and put it who-knows-where and call
    :: it who-knows-how. So... You might need to modify the code a
    :: bit and break Simon's demonstrated "pure" method of
    :: recursiveness and subroutines. Instead of having the batch
    :: file call itself, just have it jump to the starting point
    :: again. This isn't always possible, but it can be done here.
    :: Just change the "lreturn" section so it only contains these
    :: two lines:
    ::    shift
    ::    goto initial
    :: And just for completeness, stick a "goto done" at the end
    :: of the "print" code section.
    ::
    :: If you want to modify the code so it can accept any
    :: number of arguments (and ignore everything it wasn't
    :: expecting), change the "initial" code section so it only
    :: contains these lines:
    ::    if "%1"=="-c" goto lcname
    ::    if "%1"=="-s" goto lsname
    ::    if "%1"=="-u" goto luname
    ::    if "%1"=="" goto print
    ::    shift
    ::    goto initial
    :: Of course, if you do that, nothing will ever call the
    :: error code. So you could either eliminate the entire "error"
    :: code section or put another test for no arguments ahead
    :: of the "initial" code section.



    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:17 PM

  • Time Delay

        How to do a delay.
        I used to think it couldn't be done. Then I thought it
        can't be done WELL! But I know several ways to do it.
        Each with it's own problems. But first a cautionary note:
        Most people who THINK they need a time delay actually want
        to give some other program time to finish. That is best
        accomplished with the START command using the /w option:

    START /W MYPROGRAM.EXE
        _______________________________________________________

        The first way to make a time delay uses the CHOICE
        command. CHOICE has the "/t" option which lets it
        automatically select for you after a time delay. Try
        this in a DOS window now:

    choice /ty,10

        If you do NOTHING, it will wait ten seconds and enter a
        "y" for you. The problem is that if you hit anything
        other than the "y" or "n" key in those ten seconds, it
        will stop the timer and wait FOREVER for you to hit the
        correct key (a "y" or an "n" in this case). On the other
        hand, if you hit a correct key in those ten seconds, it
        stops the timer and continues IMMEDIATELY. Now generally,
        when you code for ten seconds, you want ten seconds. Not
        immediately, and not forever. If you can keep the end
        user's hands off the keyboard, things work just fine.
        _______________________________________________________

        Now, there is approach that almost eliminates the keyboard
        problems. You can force CHOICE to ignore the keyboard by
        redirecting it's input like this:

    rem | choice /ty,10

        Nothing you do will stop or hang the time delay. But keys
        entered WILL get passed on to whatever happens next. Just
        keep it in mind. And remember you can use the /n and > nul
        tricks to keep your screen clean:

    rem | choice /n /ty,10 > nul

        _______________________________________________________

        There is another workaround to the keyboard problem: Make
        all keys acceptable:

    choice /n /c±-1234567890qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnm /t±,10 > nul
    if not errorlevel 1 echo You hit a key and aborted the timeout!

        Okay, I did several things at once in the above code.
        The ± character is one of the "extended" characters (177)
        that nobody is likely to enter from a keyboard. I made
        that extended character the default character. I also
        made it the first character. That way I know if I get
        an errorlevel that isn't a one, some other key was entered.
        And I made every key I could a legal key to try to stop
        the "forever" problem.

        FYI, the CHOICE command is not generally available under NT.
        You can get it on the disk version of the Resource Kit, but
        not on the download version. If you really want to implement
        this Win9x solution on NT, you can always steal a copy of
        CHOICE.EXE from a Win9x box. All reports I've heard say it
        works just fine. If a Win98 box isn't handy, download it:
        ftp://ftp.microsoft.com/Services/TechNet/samples/PS/Win98/Reskit/SCRPTING/

        _______________________________________________________

        People running NT will be quickly frustrated by the
        above examples.  QBASIC, however, runs on Win9x and
        NT and offers a more universal solution. Try using the
        QBASIC "sleep" command. In the batch file below, I
        construct a simple two-line QBASIC program and run it.
        Couldn't be easier. The problem is that pressing any key
        immediately ends the time delay. At least there is no
        "forever" problem.

    @echo off
    echo Starting!
    echo sleep 10> sleep.bas
    echo system>> sleep.bas
    qbasic /run sleep.bas
    echo Done!
    del sleep.bas

        _______________________________________________________

        And here is the good QBASIC way, but this time using
        the "on timer" function.

    @echo off
    echo Starting!
    echo.on timer(10) gosub bail> sleep.bas
    echo timer on>> sleep.bas
    echo while -1>> sleep.bas
    echo wend>> sleep.bas
    echo system>> sleep.bas
    echo bail:>> sleep.bas
    echo system>> sleep.bas
    qbasic /run sleep.bas
    echo Done!
    del sleep.bas

        The period after the echo command is what you have to
        do to actually echo the word "on" in Win9x.

        _______________________________________________________

        One of the problems with the above methods is that
        they all send CPU usage to 100%. Actually, this is
        less of a problem than you might think if you are
        working with short, tolerable time delays. If you
        need a low a low-impact time delay, you're better
        off switching to Windows Scripting. The
        "Wscript.Sleep" command allows you to specify a
        sleep time in milliseconds. So a time delay of
        10 seconds would need a 10000 millisecond value.
        Here is batch code for a ten-second delay that
        creates the needed scripting file:

    @echo off
    echo Starting!
    echo Wscript.Sleep 10000> sleep.vbs
    start /w wscript.exe sleep.vbs
    echo Done!
    del sleep.vbs

        _______________________________________________________

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:19 PM

  • Time Delay and For Loops

    @echo off
    ::  Current delay is 60 seconds. The "1" at the end of CHOICE
    ::  gives a one-second delay. LOOP10 and LOOP6 work together
    ::  to multiply the CHOICE delay by 60.  The "1" at the end
    ::  of choice can be increased to as high as 99 for 99 minutes.


    :START

    cls
    echo Press "-" to display time now.
    echo Press any other letter or number key to exit.
    echo.|time|find /i "current"

    :LOOP6

    :LOOP10
    choice /n /c±-1234567890qwertyuiopasdfghjklzxcvbnm /t±,1>nul
    if errorlevel 3 goto QUIT
    if errorlevel 2 set loop10=*********
    if errorlevel 2 set loop6=*****
    set loop10=%loop10%*
    if not "%loop10%"=="**********" goto LOOP10
    set loop10=

    set loop6=%loop6%*
    if not "%loop6%"=="******" goto LOOP6
    set loop6=

    goto START

    :QUIT
    ::  http://www.ericphelps.com

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:19 PM

  • Random Number

    @echo off
    echo.|time|find "Current" >cu##ent.bat
    echo set time=%%3> current.bat
    call cu##ent.bat
    del cu??ent.bat > nul
    echo = | choice /c=%time%= temp2.bat > temp1.bat
    echo shift>temp2.bat
    echo shift>>temp2.bat
    echo set RANDOM=%%9>>temp2.bat
    call temp1.bat
    del temp?.bat > nul
    • Proposed as answer by Pro Batch Man Friday, March 30, 2012 9:05 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by Pro Batch Man Friday, March 30, 2012 9:06 PM
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:20 PM

  •      Here's a batch file that gets the name of the
         person logged in to Windows. Note that the name
         of this batch file CAN NOT be called "Current User.bat":

    @echo off
    start /w regedit /e reg.txt HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\control
    type reg.txt | find "Current User" > "Current#User.bat"
    echo set CurrentUser=%%1>"Current User.bat"
    call "Current#User.bat"
    del "Current?User.bat" > nul
    del reg.txt > nul
    echo %CurrentUser%
    exit
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:21 PM

  •      Here's a batch file that gets the name of the
         person logged in to the network. Note that the
         name of this batch file CAN NOT be called "username.bat":

    @echo off
    start /w regedit /e reg.txt HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Network\Logon
    type reg.txt | find "username" > "us#rname.bat"
    echo set NetUser=%%1>"username.bat"
    call "us#rname.bat"
    del "us?rname.bat" > nul
    del reg.txt > nul
    echo %NetUser%
    exit
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:22 PM

  • Get the User Name  :
    Parse the output of the NET command and use the first word as the name of a batch file.

    @echo off
    :: The "net config" generates several lines of data, among
    :: them one that has my user name like this
    :: User name EPHELPS
    :: I put just that line into a temporary batch file
    net config | find "User" > temp.bat
    :: Since the first word in my temporary batch file is "User",
    :: I'll need to create a batch file named user. The user.bat
    :: file will have the word "name" as it's first argument
    :: and the word "EPHELPS" as it's second argument. I'm
    :: obviously after the second argument here!
    echo set value=%%2> user.bat
    :: Now I call my temp.bat which will in turn run user.bat
    call temp.bat
    :: Delete the temporary files we made
    del temp.bat
    del user.bat
    :: Display the value we got!
    echo Your user name is %value%
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:23 PM

  • Code Snippet : Get the Computer Name

    @echo off
    :: Parses the output of the "net config" command to get
    :: the computer name. Uses debug to trim
    :: away all unwanted info from the response line.
    set value=
    :: Use net config to get lots of data, then filter it
    net config | find "Computer name" > setvalue.bat
    :: Use DEBUG to overwrite the beginning data
    > script echo e 0100 " set value="
    >> script echo w
    >> script echo q
    debug setvalue.bat < script > nul
    del script
    call setvalue.bat
    del setvalue.bat
    echo Computer name is %value%
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:23 PM

  • Code Snippet : Is Windows Running ?

    @echo off
    :: The MEM /M command tells if a program is running and
    :: what memory it is using. Based on my observations, WIN
    :: runs (and doesn't stop) after Windows starts. But VMM32,
    :: the virtual memory manager, only runs while the Windows
    :: GUI is active. Using these observations, a DOS batch file
    :: can tell what kind of a world it is running in.
    ::
    mem /m win | find "K"
    if errorlevel 1 goto NEVER
    mem /m vmm32 | find "K"
    if errorlevel 1 goto DOSMODE
    goto DOSWIN
    :NEVER
    cls
    echo Windows has never run. Machine was booted to DOS only.
    goto DONE
    :DOSWIN
    cls
    echo Windows is currently running and DOS is running in a window.
    goto DONE
    :DOSMODE
    cls
    echo Windows has run, but the computer was rebooted into DOS mode.
    goto DONE
    :DONE

    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:25 PM
  • CHOICE Using choice to extract individual characters will work on all DOS versions.
    School time! Type this at a DOS prompt:
    choice /c12345
    What you get is
    [1,2,3,4,5]?
    which is a demo of magic! (Go ahead and press 1,2,3,4, or 5) Choice has inserted delimiters (Commas in this case. Other delimiters are spaces, semicolons, and equals signs) between all our arguments. Well, almost. We need extra delimiters to separate the 1 and 5 from the brackets. So do this:
    choice /c=12345=
    Notice I used equals signs. Most people use semicolons. No real difference. You get this:
    [=,1,2,3,4,5,=]?
    Big progress. Now comes trick #2. Choice allows you to specify a prompt. You just add it to the end of the choice line and it shows up at the beginning of the output. Try this simple example:
    choice /c12345 Pick a number
    You get this:
    Pick a number[1,2,3,4,5]?

    But we will use the prompt as a way to get a batch file name at the beginning of the line. Building on our previous example:
    choice /c=12345= test.bat=
    Which gives this:
    test.bat=[=,1,2,3,4,5,=]?
    Notice the equals sign after the batch file name? For increased readability, you should replace it with a space. But I can't show a space at the end of the line! It works either way (space or equals).

    Next trick is to stop choice from hanging waiting for your keypress. We can just echo in one of the choices. To make it truly generic, we'll use the equals sign (since 12345 will be replaced by REAL data later on):
    echo = | choice /c=12345= test.bat=

    We now have a perfectly good command line. Let's go ahead and put this line into a batch file:

    echo = | choice /c=12345= test.bat > temp.bat
    Notice how I used a space after my "test.bat" instead of an equals sign. Our generated temp.bat will contain:
    test.bat [=,1,2,3,4,5,=]?

    Now let's create a simple test.bat. Try this:
    @echo off
    Tongue Tiedtart
    if [%1]==[] goto end
    echo %1
    shift
    goto start
    :end

    All this test.bat does is display the arguments in order. A great generic test program any time you are working with multiple arguments! When we run our TEMP.BAT, it will run TEST.BAT and give us this result:
    [
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    ]?
    The first displayed argument is "[", the second is "1", and so on. So your TEST.BAT could refer to %2 through %6 to display the first five characters.

    No we are ready to go fully generic. We'll assume we'll have a batch file that will be passed a word as an argument. The word will be %1 (the first argument). So we do away with the 12345:
    echo = | choice /c=%1= test.bat > temp.bat
    So you just put the above line in a simple batch file and call it with a word (one word with no spaces) as an argument. It will create a temp.bat which will run a test.bat. You build your test.bat to do whatever you want with the individual letters in the word.
    Sunday, June 3, 2007 4:32 PM
  • Hi All Please Help me.......

    QUESTION: QuestionReturn a value from a powershell script to a batch file and use this value in batch file?

    Hi

    I posted this in earlier thread http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winserverpowershell/thread/a3cc3abe-25c5-48f6-a73e-6f6582d9a7e1 but could not find a working solution...

    My powershell scripts looks like:

    $finalCall=""
    function controlcheckonFiles([String]$source)
    {
    
      If(some condition)
      {
        do something
        $finalCall = "T"
       }
       If (some other condition)
       {
         do something
         $finalCall="F"
       }
       return $finalCall
    
    
    }
    
    function main
      {
        #write-host "argument" $args[0]
         switch($args[0]){
        "HR" { controlcheckonFiles "HR" }
        "GL" { controlcheckonFiles "GL" }
        "AP" { controlcheckonFiles "AP"}
        "Remit" { controlcheckonFiles "Remit"}
        default { "check the arguments"}
      }
      sleep(6000)
      exit
    }
    
    main $args
    

     

     

    I am running this powershell script from a batch file

    It somewhat looks like below:

    ****running the powershell script by passing the command line argument 'AP' and setting the variable "var" with the return value****
    
    set var=powerShellScript.ps1 AP 
    
    ****applying condition on the return value****
    If(var = "T")
    
       Run another powershell script
    Else
       
       Exit

    Please help me in having the return value from the powershell script stored in a variable in batch file so that I can manipulate it further.

    If need more details please tell me?

    Thanks

     

    Friday, September 2, 2011 2:06 PM

  • Random Number

    @echo off
    echo.|time|find "Current" >cu##ent.bat
    echo set time=%%3> current.bat
    call cu##ent.bat
    del cu??ent.bat > nul
    echo = | choice /c=%time%= temp2.bat > temp1.bat
    echo shift>temp2.bat
    echo shift>>temp2.bat
    echo set RANDOM=%%9>>temp2.bat
    call temp1.bat
    del temp?.bat > nul
    is this batch code Firkin-gen worm?

    Friday, March 30, 2012 9:11 PM