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Discovered Windows XP Pro is not genuine but I did have a genuine Home edition RRS feed

  • Question

  • I bought a PC four years ago from a high street store that no longer exists. It already had Windows XP installed and this was a genuine copy. I allowed a third party to upgrade me to Windows XP Professional but have discoved that this wasn't genuine. Is there anyway I go back to using my Home edition? I'm afraid I no longer have any paperwork to prove this.

     I am worried about losing my files. If I buy a completley new copy of Windows XP Professional and install it will I lose everything?

     

    Wednesday, October 25, 2006 10:31 AM

Answers

  • John,

    Please follow these steps for assistance:

    Step 1 is to run the utility at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012, then click the Windows tab, click the "Copy" button, then paste the report into a response in this thread.

    Step 2 is to look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer or with Windows to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticty (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or another edition of Windows?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  See this page for reference:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    When a nongenuine installation of XP Pro is on a computer, the only way to return to XP Home is to do a clean installation of XP Home, after backing up and offloading any data that is to be saved.  Presumably, the original seller of the computer provided you with a means to reinstall the operating system.  More often than not, but not always, such OEM Recovery copies do have the side effect of destroying existing data and programs.

    If you did not get any such means, but your computer has a genuine COA on it, you may be able to get replacement media.  If there is no COA and no media, then it's likely that the original installation was nongenuine.  In such case, you will want to purchase a genuine copy of XP to install on the computer.  If preserving installed data and programs is the #1 concern, you will need to use a full retail license, which is what you get with the Genuine Windows Offer kit.

    Wednesday, October 25, 2006 3:49 PM

All replies

  • In order to resolve your non-genuine licensing issue, please visit: www.microsoft.com/genuine and click on "Validate Windows". When validation fails, click on the Get Genuine button which will provide information on how to acquire a WGA Kit.
    Wednesday, October 25, 2006 1:44 PM
    Moderator
  • John,

    Please follow these steps for assistance:

    Step 1 is to run the utility at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012, then click the Windows tab, click the "Copy" button, then paste the report into a response in this thread.

    Step 2 is to look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer or with Windows to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticty (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or another edition of Windows?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  See this page for reference:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    When a nongenuine installation of XP Pro is on a computer, the only way to return to XP Home is to do a clean installation of XP Home, after backing up and offloading any data that is to be saved.  Presumably, the original seller of the computer provided you with a means to reinstall the operating system.  More often than not, but not always, such OEM Recovery copies do have the side effect of destroying existing data and programs.

    If you did not get any such means, but your computer has a genuine COA on it, you may be able to get replacement media.  If there is no COA and no media, then it's likely that the original installation was nongenuine.  In such case, you will want to purchase a genuine copy of XP to install on the computer.  If preserving installed data and programs is the #1 concern, you will need to use a full retail license, which is what you get with the Genuine Windows Offer kit.

    Wednesday, October 25, 2006 3:49 PM