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"A device attached to the system is not functioning"? RRS feed

  • Question

  • As of yesterday, I started getting multiple "File Conflict" notifications.

    e.g. http://tinyurl.com/lpcklo

    Both "Server Storage" and "Disk Managerment" report all discs as healthy.

    Opened one file, no problem.

    Skimmed the File conflicts - "a device attached to the system is not functioning thread.

    But it doesn't seem to jell in light of all discs being "Healhy".

    Per another thread, I'm thinking of downloading the drive mfr's checkup utility.

    Meanwhile, does any of this ring a bell with anybody?

    I have a backup app that does scheduled file copies to external media running.
    'm wondering if a file's being enqued by that app might be a player.



    Wednesday, September 2, 2009 9:54 PM

All replies

  • As of yesterday, I started getting multiple "File Conflict" notifications.

    e.g. http://tinyurl.com/lpcklo

    Both "Server Storage" and "Disk Managerment" report all discs as healthy.

    Opened one file, no problem.

    Skimmed the File conflicts - "a device attached to the system is not functioning thread.

    But it doesn't seem to jell in light of all discs being "Healhy".

    Per another thread, I'm thinking of downloading the drive mfr's checkup utility.

    Meanwhile, does any of this ring a bell with anybody?

    I have a backup app that does scheduled file copies to external media running.
    'm wondering if a file's being enqued by that app might be a player.




    Are you sure all of your drives are connected?  Are you able to copy those files to your client desktop?  See the FAQ post: How do I resolve file conflicts for details about your problem.
    Thursday, September 3, 2009 12:17 AM
    Moderator
  • Is your server named "SAGE"?

    Assuming it is, it looks to me like you have a failing disk controller. Please log on to your server using Remote Desktop, open Device Manager, and see if there are any issues with any devices.

    As for the disk health report, it will intentionally ignore a certain number of chkdsk errors, only throwing an error when a problem persists. You could run chkdsk on all the drives in your server and examine the results for problems...

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, September 3, 2009 3:34 PM
    Moderator
  • You could run chkdsk on all the drives in your server and examine the results for problems...
    The ChkDsk I'm familiar with wants a drive letter.

    Just use "D:" and let ChkDsk sort it all out?
    Thursday, September 3, 2009 4:52 PM
  • Are you sure all of your drives are connected? 
    The drive pool is comprised of 7 WD "Green" drives and one Seagate.

    I wonder if there's something around the "Green" - like the drive spinning down when unused - that's making WHS think some drives are unavailable sometimes.
    Thursday, September 3, 2009 4:53 PM
  • Please log on to your server using Remote Desktop, open Device Manager, and see if there are any issues with any devices.

    Here's what I'm seeing: http://www.flickr.com/photos/48262653@N00/3884913000/sizes/o/

    I guess the next step is to get to the bottom of the "SM Bus Controller" thing...
    Thursday, September 3, 2009 5:04 PM
  • See How to check all the drives in your server for errors over in the FAQ section. Also, see this page on the Intel web site.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Thursday, September 3, 2009 7:17 PM
    Moderator
  • See How to check all the drives in your server for errors over in the FAQ section. Also, see this page on the Intel web site.
    Just ran it once - but killed it bco the progress was slow.  

    I'll fire it up again tomorrow morning before I go to work and just let it go as long as it needs.

    But I'm starting to wonder about WHS.

    Downloaded Western Digital's drive inspection utility with the thought of removing/running the utility against/re-adding each of my drives one-by-one.

    Figured the logical one to remove/check first was the one I just added - and which shows up in WHS as having no data on it - and here's what I got: http://www.flickr.com/photos/48262653@N00/3885845376/sizes/o/

    Maybe I'm missing somelthing...
    Thursday, September 3, 2009 11:40 PM
  • Just ran it once - but killed it bco the progress was slow.  

    I'll fire it up again tomorrow morning before I go to work and just let it go as long as it needs.

    But I'm starting to wonder about WHS.

    Downloaded Western Digital's drive inspection utility with the thought of removing/running the utility against/re-adding each of my drives one-by-one.

    Figured the logical one to remove/check first was the one I just added - and which shows up in WHS as having no data on it - and here's what I got: http://www.flickr.com/photos/48262653@N00/3885845376/sizes/o/

    Maybe I'm missing somelthing...
    While I love the Disk Management add-in in terms of allowing you to create a wireframe pic of your server and map out the drives accordingly, I would never remove a drive using it when MS already provides a way to do just that through their interface.  What happens if you try to remove that drive through the Disk Storage tab?
    Friday, September 4, 2009 3:46 AM
    Moderator
  • While I love the Disk Management add-in in terms of allowing you to create a wireframe pic of your server and map out the drives accordingly, I would never remove a drive using it when MS already provides a way to do just that through their interface.  What happens if you try to remove that drive through the Disk Storage tab?
    Mea Culpa.  This is the second time I've referred to Disk Management as if it were part of WHS.... Gotta get that straight in what's left of my mind.

    I think I chose it without thinking bc it's the only one of the two that gives me a shot at identifying which drive is which.  I have them hard-labeled in the bays "Disc1", "Disc2",... and so-forth.

    I'll try doing it the right way sometime later in the weekend when nothing's running.


    BTW Here's the output of  Ken's ChkDsk command file.   I note the 4kb in bad sectors, but dunno what, if anything to do.... Makes me think that, when formatting a new drive (one of my services wants 64-k sectors) the "Full Format" option might be preferable to "Quick Format" on the though that maybe "Full Format" would lock out bad sectors.... or is that something that needs tb done at a lower level?

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Microsoft Windows [Version 5.2.3790]
    (C) Copyright 1985-2003 Microsoft Corp.

    C:\>ChkDsk_All_Drives.cmd

    C:\>net stop pdl

    The Windows Home Server Drive Letter Service service was stopped successfully.


    C:\>net stop whsbackup

    The Windows Home Server Computer Backup service was stopped successfully.


    C:\>chkdsk D: /x /r
    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Volume dismounted.  All opened handles to this volume are now invalid.
    Volume label is DATA.

    CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 5)...
    92016 file records processed.
    File verification completed.
    11 large file records processed.
    0 bad file records processed.
    0 EA records processed.
    82622 reparse records processed.
    CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 5)...
    332035 index entries processed.
    Index verification completed.
    5 unindexed files processed.
    CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors (stage 3 of 5)...
    92016 security descriptors processed.
    Security descriptor verification completed.
    9115 data files processed.
    CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal...
    36854048 USN bytes processed.
    Usn Journal verification completed.
    CHKDSK is verifying file data (stage 4 of 5)...
    92000 files processed.
    File data verification completed.
    CHKDSK is verifying free space (stage 5 of 5)...
    33422060 free clusters processed.
    Free space verification is complete.

     272052742 KB total disk space.
     138126608 KB in 82815 files.
         35216 KB in 9116 indexes.
             4 KB in bad sectors.
        202674 KB in use by the system.
         65536 KB occupied by the log file.
     133688240 KB available on disk.

          4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
      68013185 total allocation units on disk.
      33422060 allocation units available on disk.

    C:\>chkdsk C: /x /r
    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Cannot lock current drive.

    Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another
    process.  Would you like to schedule this volume to be
    checked the next time the system restarts? (Y/N)
    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Saturday, September 5, 2009 12:18 AM
  • Mea Culpa.  This is the second time I've referred to Disk Management as if it were part of WHS.... Gotta get that straight in what's left of my mind.

    I think I chose it without thinking bc it's the only one of the two that gives me a shot at identifying which drive is which.  I have them hard-labeled in the bays "Disc1", "Disc2",... and so-forth.

    I'll try doing it the right way sometime later in the weekend when nothing's running.


    BTW Here's the output of  Ken's ChkDsk command file.   I note the 4kb in bad sectors, but dunno what, if anything to do.... Makes me think that, when formatting a new drive (one of my services wants 64-k sectors) the "Full Format" option might be preferable to "Quick Format" on the though that maybe "Full Format" would lock out bad sectors.... or is that something that needs tb done at a lower level?

    ------------------------------------------------------------
    Microsoft Windows [Version 5.2.3790]
    (C) Copyright 1985-2003 Microsoft Corp.

    C:\>ChkDsk_All_Drives.cmd

    C:\>net stop pdl

    The Windows Home Server Drive Letter Service service was stopped successfully.


    C:\>net stop whsbackup

    The Windows Home Server Computer Backup service was stopped successfully.


    C:\>chkdsk D: /x /r
    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Volume dismounted.  All opened handles to this volume are now invalid.
    Volume label is DATA.

    CHKDSK is verifying files (stage 1 of 5)...
    92016 file records processed.
    File verification completed.
    11 large file records processed.
    0 bad file records processed.
    0 EA records processed.
    82622 reparse records processed.
    CHKDSK is verifying indexes (stage 2 of 5)...
    332035 index entries processed.
    Index verification completed.
    5 unindexed files processed.
    CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors (stage 3 of 5)...
    92016 security descriptors processed.
    Security descriptor verification completed.
    9115 data files processed.
    CHKDSK is verifying Usn Journal...
    36854048 USN bytes processed.
    Usn Journal verification completed.
    CHKDSK is verifying file data (stage 4 of 5)...
    92000 files processed.
    File data verification completed.
    CHKDSK is verifying free space (stage 5 of 5)...
    33422060 free clusters processed.
    Free space verification is complete.

     272052742 KB total disk space.
     138126608 KB in 82815 files.
         35216 KB in 9116 indexes.
             4 KB in bad sectors.
        202674 KB in use by the system.
         65536 KB occupied by the log file.
     133688240 KB available on disk.

          4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
      68013185 total allocation units on disk.
      33422060 allocation units available on disk.

    C:\>chkdsk C: /x /r
    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Cannot lock current drive.

    Chkdsk cannot run because the volume is in use by another
    process.  Would you like to schedule this volume to be
    checked the next time the system restarts? (Y/N)
    ------------------------------------------------------------

    You're not going to like my suggestion (considering how much unsupported stuff you have apparently done with your server, which is noticable by your second pic), but I would replace your primary drive and do a Server Reinstallation.  IMO, even 4 KB in bad sectors is a bad sign.  There is no way to get those sectors back, and hard drives never fix themselves.  While it may only be 4 KB today, that doesn't mean it won't multiply in time (as a matter of fact, you can bet it will, it's just a matter of when).  And considering this is a device where, at least in concept, you keep all of your data (including irreplaceable files such as family photos, tax documents, etc), I would never trust that drive again.
    Saturday, September 5, 2009 5:31 PM
    Moderator
  • You're not going to like my suggestion (considering how much unsupported stuff you have apparently done with your server, which is noticable by your second pic), but I would replace your primary drive and do a Server Reinstallation. 
    I think your suggestion is right on the money - as was Ken's to the same effect at least a week ago. Only things holding me back have been

    • Making myself comfortable with the notion that a reinstall is reliable for preserving data
    • Creating a procedure to account for the SageTV install, the SecondCopy install, and the various user accounts I've created
    • Getting past the various threads I've read about WHS telling people a drive is failing when it apparently isn't really failing

    But the time is coming very soon....maybe this weekend.
    Saturday, September 5, 2009 6:20 PM
  • Bad sectors: If a drive detects a problem, it will retry several times. Depending on how that goes, it may decide that the sector it's trying to read is damaged, in which case it will be marked as a bad sector and one of the reserve sectors on the disk will be mapped in it's place. Those bad sectors are what chkdsk is reporting: issues that have already been dealt with. 4k is a small number; I would not automatically assume that the disk is failing just because of that. Your other symptoms are much more suggestive.

    A server reinstallation will preserve data as follows:
    • If the reinstallation is to correct OS corruption you should lose no data, backups, or add-in data stored in "application folders" (a structure Windows Home Server makes available through it's API). If an add-in stores configuration data in the registry, you will lose it.
    • If the reinstallation is to replace the system drive, you should lose no data from duplicated shares. You may lose data from shares you have chosen not to duplicate; this is a decision you made when you decided not to duplicate those shares. You may also lose your backup database; Microsoft has decided that given the size and the relative ease of recreating it, it's sacrificial, so it's not duplicated. You may also lose data from add-ins. Add-ins can persist their data in an application folder, as stated above. This structure supports duplication, but not all add-ins use application folders, and not all that do turn duplication on.
    Note that the caveats in the second scenario above also apply to any other drive failure scenario.
    The procedure to account for the SageTV install is to reinstall and reconfigure SageTV. I understand that this is a painful process, but it's the process you signed up for when you decided to install it.

    SecondCopy you don't need (there is, as I have said repeatedly, no generic way to restore the system partition of your server in the event of a server reinstallation that's reliable) so don't worry about it.

    Users, though... When you recreate a user in the console it can be hooked back up to the associated personal folder if one exists, so there should be little pain here. Presumably you have documentation on exact permissions for users created outside of the Windows Home Server console. If you don't, you have a hard row to hoe.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Sunday, September 6, 2009 3:55 AM
    Moderator
    • If the reinstallation is to replace the system drive, you should lose no data from duplicated shares. You may lose data from shares you have chosen not to duplicate


    Is there an argument for/against a large main drive?

    I have a 1-TB drive laying around and would be tempted to use it - wretched excess or no - if there were no downside.

    A possible downside that occurs to me is that, with all that space left over after the tombstones are created, WHS might be tempted to put more data on it - as in your observation about  non-duplicated data being at risk.

    I like to keep at least 1.5TB of free space in the pool against the day that I need to remove a disk.

    I'll report back on the SageTV re-install.
    Monday, September 7, 2009 12:26 AM
  • Is there an argument for/against a large main drive?

    The only "problem" with a large drive isn't so much the size and how it gets used (Power Pack 1 changed that), it's the type of drive (SATA only).  Reinstalling on a SATA drive can be tricky (unless you put your SATA ports in IDE/Legacy mode).

    I have a 1-TB drive laying around and would be tempted to use it - wretched excess or no - if there were no downside.

    A possible downside that occurs to me is that, with all that space left over after the tombstones are created, WHS might be tempted to put more data on it - as in your observation about  non-duplicated data being at risk.

    It will not store any data on your primary drive unless there is no where else to put it.

    I like to keep at least 1.5TB of free space in the pool against the day that I need to remove a disk.

    I'll report back on the SageTV re-install.

    Monday, September 7, 2009 12:38 AM
    Moderator
  • The data loss risks with a system drive replacement are identical to those for any drive in the storage pool. Windows Home Server used the D: partition on the system drive as part of the storage pool, and may, if forced to by lack of space on other drives (or lack of other drives) store data on the D: partition. The loss of any single drive in the pool will not lose files in your shares if they're duplicated, but it may do so if they aren't.

    The choice to use duplication on a share is the end user's. If you can recreate the data in a share without huge and painful effort there's no need for duplication. Likewise there's no need to duplicate a share which never contains anything but transient data. If, however, you have .5 TB of Apple Lossless (like I do) and you shudder at the thought of spending weeks re-ripping all those CDs, then perhaps you'll decide to turn duplication on for your music share. :)
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Monday, September 7, 2009 3:09 AM
    Moderator
  • The data loss risks with a system drive replacement are identical to those for any drive in the storage pool. Windows Home Server used the D: partition on the system drive as part of the storage pool, and may, if forced to by lack of space on other drives (or lack of other drives) store data on the D: partition. The loss of any single drive in the pool will not lose files in your shares if they're duplicated, but it may do so if they aren't.
    I just blew off a little over six man hours trying to do a reinstall.

    Doped out the part about the new drive having to have no partitions and having tb recoginized as Drive 0 in order for the reinstall option tb available.

    Got that far, proceeded with the install, but got a series of errors that seem tb around "Restoring the archiver data failed. Error 0x80004005."

    Figured maybe it was something to do with replacing an IDE drive with a SATA drive, so I tried again using a fresh-out-of-the-wrapper 320-gig IDE drive - closely resembling the system drive that is currently reported by WHS tb failing.

    Re-arranged BIOS's drive order so the new IDE drive was back as the first drive.... but WHS wasn't offering up the reinstall choice.


    I'm sure many others have succeeded in this endeavour - and I might even join them if I spend enough hours reading enough threads...

    But right now, my gut says the cost-effective approach is to throw a little more money at the problem and spend those hours getting paid on my day job.

    To wit:
    • Buy or assemble a device that will let me stack as many drives as I need to get enough to back up my WHS shares that are not already being backed up on a daily basis (that would be just two: ripped DVDs and recorded TV shows)  NAS?   Maybe something that just presents via USB?  Or maybe just $100 on a second WHS license and create a temporary server in an unused PC... depending on what's laying around, that might be the most el-cheapo way to go.
    • Buy enough additional drives to give said device the required capacity.
    • Set up a folder on said device for each WHS share
    • Copy each WHS share to it's respective folder
    • Then do a "New" install of WHS and when's all done re-create my shares and populate them from the backup device.

    That might even be worked into something to enhance my existing backup scheme - like maybe once a week fire it up and update the recorded TV shows and any newly-ripped DVDs.


    Monday, September 7, 2009 8:30 PM