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Attempted to restore a system volume using the CTP Restore CD RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • CAB 349067474

    Saturday, June 09, 2007

    I attempted to restore a system volume using the CTP Restore CD.

    The test client had a 500 GB SATA drive.

    It was replaced with a 200 GB SATA drive to simulate what could happen in a real world application of WHS.

    The first time the wizard ran it could see that the backup to be used was from a 497 GB volume.  It asked that the new volume be prepared using Disk Manager. That being done and Disk Manager having been closed nothing more happened.

    Restarted the computer and ran through the wizard again. This time it showed a red X between the backup source volume and the target drive. This seemed strange because nowhere near 200 GB of space was used on the source drive. One should expect to be able to restore to a system drive which is physically smaller than the source so long as there is room on the target drive for all the files from the backup. Yet this does not seem to be the case by design in WHS. I consider the scheme flawed.

    I put the 500 GB drive into the test machine and booted to the restore CD, ran through the wizard and the wizard hung just after the copying was done but before the announcement that the process had finished. The client would not boot.

    I booted to the restore CD again, ran through the wizard and was then successful in restoring the system volume on the client. The client started normally.

    Also, when I attempted to view the sole backup of the affected machine from the WHS console I received a message that a drive Z: could not be found/accessed. I intended to copy the drivers just to see if I could per the documentation.

    I trust these issues have been addressed in the RC, though I could see no evidence of it in the feedback.

     

    Stan

    Sunday, June 10, 2007 5:04 PM

All replies

  • I can't answer for all the issues. You won't be able to restore to a drive that's physically smaller, though. I think the expectation is that you'll be going out and buying a new drive, or obtaining a replacement from the manufacturer, so you're unlikely to use a smaller drive.

    The other issues have been reported by other users. I don't know that they have all been fixed, but I would be surprised if they haven't been addressed somehow.
    Monday, June 11, 2007 8:21 PM
    Moderator
  • You won't be able to restore to a drive that's physically smaller, though

     

    Bad decision!

     

    Here is what would happen in my case.  The 160 GB drive in my desktop fails.  I put in the 120 GB drive I have lying around and try restore to it, WHS won’t let that happen, (well that's what I understand anyway).  I send the failed drive off to the manufacturer for repair/replacement AND I have to go out and buy a new drive to use TEMPORALLY until the original comes back.  Not the way I’d like things to happen in my home, not at all.

     

    The lack of support for restoring to smaller drive FORCES me to spend money unnecessarily; it will not make me happy if it comes to pass.

    Wednesday, June 13, 2007 6:50 PM
  •  Jeshimon wrote:

    You won't be able to restore to a drive that's physically smaller, though

    Bad decision!

    Here is what would happen in my case. The 160 GB drive in my desktop fails. I put in the 120 GB drive I have lying around and try restore to it, WHS won’t let that happen, (well that's what I understand anyway). I send the failed drive off to the manufacturer for repair/replacement AND I have to go out and buy a new drive to use TEMPORALLY until the original comes back. Not the way I’d like things to happen in my home, not at all.

    The lack of support for restoring to smaller drive FORCES me to spend money unnecessarily; it will not make me happy if it comes to pass.



    not to sound rude, but why would you send the drive away and buy a temp one? most HD manufacturers offer RMA service where you give them your credit card #, they ship you a new drive in the proper packaging, and you send your old one back to them in the same packaging. you might be out 2-4 days for shipping time but still cheaper than buying a temp HD.  and they only charge your credit card if they don't receive your RMA drive back within 30 days.  i've done this quite a few times and had no problems.  as long as your drive is still in warranty...which the site should tell you after entering your serial number.  you should be good to go.
    Thursday, July 19, 2007 5:28 AM
  • If they let me restore to anything it would fit on I'd have no time at all.  That would be better for me.
    Thursday, July 19, 2007 11:06 AM
  • The problem is that the backup is cluster-based not file-based, so the restore process can only work if there are equal or more clusters on the new drive (thus a larger drive is needed).

    I also would appreciate it if it was different, maybe we see some solutions in v2 Smile

    Greets, Alex

    Thursday, July 19, 2007 2:38 PM
  • Partition your hard drives moving forward -  say 60Gb per OS, and the remainder as a DATA partition.

     

    Takes care of several current problems as workarounds:

     

    1.  Can backup and restore x64 partitions, as long as a x86 partition has the connector installed and being backed up.

    2.  No matter what the size of the disk is, as long as your partition size is = < your largest physical spare your set to go.

    3.  DATA drive is backed up AND available to access stuff locally instead of through the "Shared Folders on Server".

     

    Cheers

    Friday, July 20, 2007 3:28 AM