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Here is my $0.25 may I please buy a clue? RRS feed

  • Question

  •  I have spent at least 4 hours reading the threads contained within the three forums regarding this Not-Genuine vs. Genuine issue and have yet to find any answers. The system I am using has been rebuilt, reconfigured, updated, upgraded and every other kind of "re-" and "up-" you can do to a computer. The only original parts left are one of the hard drives and the keyboard. Up until recently I have always had at least two hard drives, one for the OS and one for my data. I now have 3 hard drives and unfortunately my most recent writing projects as well as other sensitive data and programs have overflowed onto the drive containing my OS. I have read the horror stories from people who have had to do multiple reinstalls on their systems and I do not desire to have this happen. Of course I have all of my data backed up so that is not a problem. One of the issues is that I have absolutely no desire to go through the day long multiple install attempts that always accompany any attempt at re-installing windows as well as having to reinstall the programs and drivers I currently have in my system. May be that is petty to others but it is an annoying process for me.

     I have the disks and CDs from every windows os installation I have ever installed from 1.01Beta with the Xerox Mouse through WIN2000, but I do not have the receipts or the original packaging. I have a copy of the original XP Pro CD. I personally made that copy when I had a job assignment in Brazil and took that with me just in case I would need to re-install while I was in that country. I didn't want to lose the original but lost it anyway during one of the three moves I have made since I purchased it, so now I have only the backup copy I made. That copy was used to re-install XP Pro on the machine it was originally installed upon following a month long fight with a Trojan horse. I do not have the receipt or the original packaging as I never planned on having to return the product after the first two years of ownership, nor did I see that I would have to prove to anyone that I had a "Genuine" and "Original" product since the CD was only used by myself. I routinely keep my receipts for purchases over $100 US for two years after date of purchase then I throw them away.

    I have a problem with the only option being that I am forced to purchase something that I already own and have owned for several years. Now that I am on a fixed income I do not have the extra money to spend on a product that I have already purchased once. I understand that MS is a business and that this process is being implemented to protect that business. What I do not understand is why myself and others who have legally purchased a genuine product from licensed vendors and retail outlets are being treated as if we were dishonest children. Having never met anyone who works at MS and visa versa I am offended by the sight unseen, unsubstantiated assumption that I am dishonest.

    If all that is going to happen on the part of a MS representative in reply to my posting is a canned response please do not condescend to reply. However if you are able to direct me to a support structure that is capable of actually addressing my grievance rather than generating yet another party-line response it would be greatly appreciated. That aforementioned grievance being: How do I fix my legally purchased, genuine product that is being identified as counterfeit without having to chance a reinstall of the OS or being required to spend $200 - $300 US?

    Sunday, June 25, 2006 3:48 AM

Answers

  • Snorii,

    Please follow these steps for assistance:

    Step 1 is to download and run the utility at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012, then click the Windows tab, Copy to Clipboard, then paste the report into a response message in this thread.

    Step 2 would have been to look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticty (COA).  However, I gather from what you wrote that you no longer have the COA for the copy of XP you are using.  Can't say for sure, but it sounds like you might have purchased a retail upgrade of XP to go from Windows 2000 Professional to XP Professional.

    To try to figure out what XP CD you have, explore the CD and look for a setupp.ini file in the i386 folder.  That file will have two lines, please post the second line.

    With the details from that file and the results of the MGA diagnostic tool from Step 1, we should get a pretty good idea of the situation.

    Monday, June 26, 2006 8:13 PM

All replies

  • Sunday, June 25, 2006 4:01 PM
    Moderator
  • Snorii,

    Please follow these steps for assistance:

    Step 1 is to download and run the utility at this link http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012, then click the Windows tab, Copy to Clipboard, then paste the report into a response message in this thread.

    Step 2 would have been to look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticty (COA).  However, I gather from what you wrote that you no longer have the COA for the copy of XP you are using.  Can't say for sure, but it sounds like you might have purchased a retail upgrade of XP to go from Windows 2000 Professional to XP Professional.

    To try to figure out what XP CD you have, explore the CD and look for a setupp.ini file in the i386 folder.  That file will have two lines, please post the second line.

    With the details from that file and the results of the MGA diagnostic tool from Step 1, we should get a pretty good idea of the situation.

    Monday, June 26, 2006 8:13 PM
  • Microsoft "owns" your OS. you just pay to use it
    Sunday, July 9, 2006 5:28 AM