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windows license RRS feed

  • Question

  • Dear

     

    If i buy one single license of windows professional and office 2003, can I use the same license for how many computers?. I am expecting your kind reply

    Tuesday, October 3, 2006 5:20 PM

Answers

  • Arafth,

    As Carey posted, XP can only be activated on one computer at a time, and on that computer only one installation of XP can be activated using one license.  If you purchased a retail full license, you can move the XP license from one computer to another as many times as you want, but it can only be activated on one computer at a time.  The OEM license for XP restricts the use of the license to only the first computer on which it is installed and activated--it cannot be moved to another computer.

    Office is a different story, depending upon the license purchased.  A retail full Office license can be installed and activated on two computers, specifically on a desktop computer and a "portable" (IOW, a laptop) computer owned by the same person and for that person's exclusive use.  OEM licenses for Office can only be installed on one computer, and that computer has to be the computer onto which Office was first installed by the OEM.  There is one retail version of Office 2003, Student and Teacher edition, that allows installation and activation on three computers at the same time, but these computers must be used in a noncommercial setting, such as a school or household.

    Wednesday, October 4, 2006 4:03 PM

All replies

  • Windows XP Professional can only be installed and activated on one (1) computer. Office 2003 can be installed and activated on two (2) computers, a desktop PC and a notebook PC.

     

    Tuesday, October 3, 2006 7:57 PM
    Moderator
  • Arafth,

    As Carey posted, XP can only be activated on one computer at a time, and on that computer only one installation of XP can be activated using one license.  If you purchased a retail full license, you can move the XP license from one computer to another as many times as you want, but it can only be activated on one computer at a time.  The OEM license for XP restricts the use of the license to only the first computer on which it is installed and activated--it cannot be moved to another computer.

    Office is a different story, depending upon the license purchased.  A retail full Office license can be installed and activated on two computers, specifically on a desktop computer and a "portable" (IOW, a laptop) computer owned by the same person and for that person's exclusive use.  OEM licenses for Office can only be installed on one computer, and that computer has to be the computer onto which Office was first installed by the OEM.  There is one retail version of Office 2003, Student and Teacher edition, that allows installation and activation on three computers at the same time, but these computers must be used in a noncommercial setting, such as a school or household.

    Wednesday, October 4, 2006 4:03 PM
  • Ok, I understood about installing the OEM W. in one pc only, but what hapend if my HD just deside to stop working, or the MB just dies on me?
    Friday, October 6, 2006 2:09 AM
  • Lewisville,

    The OEM license for XP restricts the use of the license to only the first computer on which it is installed and activated--it cannot be moved to another computer.  For the purpose of defining what a computer is, since it is really just a collection of parts, MS has established that the motherboard is the base component that defines what a given computer is.  So, if your computer came with an OEM license for Windows, that license is tied or "married" to that particular motherboard.

    This definition has an exception to cover situation where the original motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  In such case, your OEM license for Windows can be used with the replacement motherboard.  If your OEM uses System Lock Preinstall (SLP) technology, a technology that allows the media they provide (say, a CD or DVD) to install only on a motherboard that has the OEM's "signature" embedded into the motherboard's BIOS, then in order to use the Windows media that came with the computer, you would have to install the manufacturer's dsignated replacement motherboard.  If the replacement motherboard you select is not compatible with the OEM media, then in order to continue to install and use your OEM license on that new motherboard, you will have to acquire generic media to install Windows, but you will still be able to use the Product Key that came with your OEM license to activate the license, except you will have to use the telephonic activation process rather than the automated online process.

    The above exception does NOT apply to situation where you decide to replace a functional OEM motherboard in order to achieve greater performance or add new hardware features.  In this situation, the new motherboard constitutes a new computer, and since your OEM license does not transfer to any other computer, you would be required to acquire a new license.

    Replacement of other hardware in the computer has no bearing on licensing, so you can add, change or remove other hardware as desired.  Windows Product Activation does monitor several characteristics of the hardware collection on your computer, so changing hardware may trigger a requirement for you to reactivate the license for Windows on the computer.  Computer enthusiasts and hobbyists who love to install new hardware and tinker with the configurations of their computer may encounter a situation after many reinstallations and hardware changes where Windows Product Activation will report that a given Product Key "has been used too many times" and will not automatically activate online.  In these cases, a telephonic activation is required, but as long as the given license for Windows is being used in accordance with the End User Licensing Agreement, Product Activation will not be refused.

    Friday, October 6, 2006 3:36 AM