locked
WHS v1: Chkdsk logs say okay - but drive seems to be missing RRS feed

  • Question

  • I had a flash Console message saying something about drive failed on DE/shares (or similar - it was too quick for me to catch). I found Ken's hugely helpful 'How to...' about drive checking and did just that. (It took nearly all day.)

    (Chkdsk 'How to...': http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/whsfaq/thread/b5372407-1f24-4eff-9092-069c4b4f0cee)

    The three Chkdsk log files end with:

    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Volume label is SYS.

    WARNING! F parameter not specified.
    Running CHKDSK in read-only mode.

    ...

    20972825 KB total disk space.
    11026028 KB in 23945 files.
    7776 KB in 3328 indexes.
    0 KB in bad sectors.
    131161 KB in use by the system.
    65536 KB occupied by the log file.
    9807860 KB available on disk.

    4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
    5243206 total allocation units on disk.
    2451965 allocation units available on disk.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Volume label is DATA.

    WARNING! F parameter not specified.
    Running CHKDSK in read-only mode.

    ...

    1932523109 KB total disk space.
    684428120 KB in 211508 files.
    63600 KB in 3914 indexes.
    0 KB in bad sectors.
    376361 KB in use by the system.
    65536 KB occupied by the log file.
    1247655028 KB available on disk.

    4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
    483130777 total allocation units on disk.
    311913757 allocation units available on disk.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The type of the file system is NTFS.
    Volume label is DATA.

    WARNING! F parameter not specified.
    Running CHKDSK in read-only mode.

    ...

    488375968 KB total disk space.
    320532136 KB in 51106 files.
    14416 KB in 1113 indexes.
    0 KB in bad sectors.
    133180 KB in use by the system.
    65536 KB occupied by the log file.
    167696236 KB available on disk.

    4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
    122093992 total allocation units on disk.
    41924059 allocation units available on disk.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I had expected four logs as I have four drives:

    Samsung 1.5TB

    Hitachi 1TB

    Hitachi 500MB

    ST (can't remember!) 2TB (main, system drive)

    Very confused. I assume that the first log is the System (20MB) partition, the second is the 2TB drive and the third is the 500MB.  If this is correct, I’m also assuming the 1TB Hitachi is dodgy as it doesn’t seem to appear. (But note this is all guess work for me!)

    When I got the flash message I logged into the Console but it took ages ‘calculating’ the pie chart for storage space – and seemed to have lost a chunk of free space, but it’s been a while since I checked so I can’t be sure.

    I then logged onto Remote Desktop but the 1TB drive did not appear under My Computer – though it appears as ‘Healthy’ in the Console.

    Am I right to remove the 1TB Hitachi in WHS Console (and then from the box, presumably). But why is the drive okay in the Console but not in Remote Desktop?

    Cheers,

    Chris

    Saturday, April 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Answers

  • Consider the possibility that you have a driver issue, or a problem with the SATA controller in your server.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    • Marked as answer by ChrisOfTheOT Saturday, May 18, 2013 1:42 PM
    Saturday, May 11, 2013 12:55 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • I forgot to say that the 1.5TB Samsung is not part of the storage pool, it's set as a backup drive. (Maybe that's why Chkdsk didn't scan it?)

    Anyway, now that the 1TB is removed & the 1.5 TB added, the system seems happy enough - that is, everything is working properly with no data loss (that I've noticed so far). Obviously we've got no backup drive now but since I have never got SyncBack or SyncToy to work properly, that seems rather moot anyway.

    I'm not sure how to check the 1TB drive now that it's removed from the Server storage either...

    I'll try backing up the laptops next.

    Cheers,

    Chris

    Saturday, April 13, 2013 2:35 PM

  • I'm not sure how to check the 1TB drive now that it's removed from the Server storage either...


    You should be able to check it from Drive Management. Right click on the partition and select Properties, Tools & Check Now. This will require you lo log in locally or use RDC.

    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.

    Saturday, April 13, 2013 2:46 PM
  • Thanks for the reply Phil - I looked at Disk Management (in Computer Management) but the 'Properties' option for each drive only offers a dialogue box with the 'General/Security/Shadow Copy/Quota' tabs. What have I missed? (All drives, including the 'Removed' drive, show as 'Healthy'.)

    Cheers,

    Chris

    Saturday, April 13, 2013 3:58 PM
  • Hmm. I don't have a WHS1 system to check but you can certainly use that method on WHS2011 on a drive that does not have a drive letter such as the server backup drive.

    Phil P.S. If you find my comment helpful or if it answers your question, please mark it as such.

    Saturday, April 13, 2013 4:04 PM
  • Further investigation (WHS Unleashed book) says that Chkdsk for a drive without an assigned letter (because all drives are melded together as part of Drive Extender) will only work in Command Prompt. I've no idea how to do that but I imagine the book will explain it.

    However, having retruned on Monday morning, I find that neither laptop can connect to the server. Toolkit says that all connection attempts fail - Connector, web, RDP, etc. - so I can't get anywhere. Perhaps WHS updated over the weekend? But if so, why doesn't Windows Update on the laptops update Connector to match?

    The only option I can see is to crash the server and attach the monitor & keyboard. AGAIN. I'm desperately hoping this won't be necessary... Any ideas on how I can connect?

    Cheers,

    Chris

    Monday, April 15, 2013 9:00 AM
  • I am now leaving an old keyboard and monitor connected permanently as these connection issues are pathetic.

    But what a dreadful ten days I’ve had with the server! Numerous Chkdsk logs reported numerous problems. For example:

    16th – 2TB Seagate:

    1932523109 KB total disk space.
     684882548 KB in 211461 files.
         63604 KB in 3914 indexes.
     871816500 KB in bad sectors.
        375849 KB in use by the system.
         65536 KB occupied by the log file.
     375384608 KB available on disk.

          4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
     483130777 total allocation units on disk.
      93846152 allocation units available on disk.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    17th – 500GB Hitachi:

    465127968 KB total disk space.
     814850240 KB in 128109 files.
         33600 KB in 2275 indexes.
             4 KB in bad sectors.
        241136 KB in use by the system.
         65536 KB occupied by the log file.
     650002988 KB available on disk.

          4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
     366281992 total allocation units on disk.
     162500747 allocation units available on disk.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    19th – 1.5TB Samsung:

    1465127968 KB total disk space.
     814863868 KB in 128115 files.
         33604 KB in 2276 indexes.
             4 KB in bad sectors.
        241136 KB in use by the system.
         65536 KB occupied by the log file.
     649989356 KB available on disk.

          4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
     366281992 total allocation units on disk.
     162497339 allocation units available on disk.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    19th (also) – 2TB Seagate:

    1932523109 KB total disk space.
     684882552 KB in 211472 files.
         63612 KB in 3916 indexes.
     871816500 KB in bad sectors.
        375849 KB in use by the system.
         65536 KB occupied by the log file.
     375384596 KB available on disk.

          4096 bytes in each allocation unit.
     483130777 total allocation units on disk.
      93846149 allocation units available on disk.

    Insane! According to the last Chkdsk log, about a third of the main drive is ‘bad sectors’ and three of the four drives were faulty. I was getting so stressed & confused.

    First I downloaded Seagate’s hugely helpful SeaTools and their life-saving DiscWizard. (DiscWizard will only install and run if you have a Seagate drive actually attached. See Seagate downloads page: http://www.seagate.com/support/downloads/)

    After running SeaTools – up to eight hours per drive (!) – it said there was nothing wrong with the main 2TB drive. A huge relief, even though I did discover that this drive is still under guarantee until December. The others were also okay, except the Samsung 1.5TB which failed all tests, even the quick & easy ‘Short DST’. Note also that the results from SeaTools for this drive were the only ones which corresponded to the Chkdsk logs. I have no idea why they differ but this only added to my stress & confusion…

    SeaTools offers a very long scan option, called ‘Long Generic’, failed finding bad sectors. The options then are the ‘Advanced Tests’ which, after numerous warnings, offer complete data destruction.

    I went for the ‘Full Erase’ as it was the only option which potentially offered to recover the bad sector/s. (I now think it was one boot sector which caused the problem. But what do I know?)

    ‘Full Erase’ failed. (I expect we are on day six by now.)

    Googling directed me to Seagate DiscWizard which I ran yesterday. It promised a more ‘aggressive’ disc wipe. Somehow, ‘aggressively’ (?) writing zeros to every part of every sector can recover bad sectors. It was worth a try.

    Note that DiscWizard can run from a boot disc but since I was using USB, I thought I’d try the cuddly GUI version. This was tricky because I didn’t find enough SATA & USB extensions/gender changers. I had to pull the SATA cables from the server, place my laptop right next to the server on the floor and dangle all the short cables & adapters from the USB sockets.

    (Some drives were not recognised with some USB extension cables or adapter combinations, or from every USB socket on my Qosmio laptop. Also, because DiscWizard will not run without a Seagate drive attached, I had to cobble a second USB-SATA adapter to the laptop, also with a very short cable.)

    Once connected & correctly recognised, I ran DiscWizard. After the drive is selected, it’s not 100% clear which drive is having its data destroyed so it’s a bit of a stressful process. Lovely. When launched, DiscWizard said it wanted another eight hours. Great. I began at 11 a.m. yesterday. I returned at about 3 p.m. to find that DiscWizard wanted a further 12 hours…

    I left it running all night, which I hate doing (not least because these Chinese SATA/USB adapter kits use a dreadfully cheap & shoddy power supply.) I came down this morning to find the laptop still running (DiscWizard was set to shut down the laptop when finished).

    The progress bar looked like it had finished but there was no confirmation. I decided to turn everything off as I figured that if it could not finish in 20 hours, it wasn’t going to.

    What to do next? I wasn’t confident enough to put the server back together so after a laptop reboot, I (bravely) scanned the Samsung drive again with SeaTools. Previously, even the ‘Short DST’ test failed so, since it’s the quickest (60-90 seconds) I ran it. A very long minute-and-half! But it passed. Hurrah, hurrah!

    I disconnected all the SATA-USB guff and put the server back together. Would the (also excellent) Home Sever SMART drive monitor snap-in give the Samsung drive the all clear? Yes! All ‘Status’ checks are healthy! (Home Server SMART Classic (for WHS v1): http://dojonorthsoftware.net/HomeServerSMARTClassic.html#all)

    I have added the drive back on the WHS Console. I had to add it to the storage pool first as it wouldn’t format it for backup use for some reason, then I removed it again. I was then able to add the drive for backup use and it is now backing up the server Shares to the Samsung drive (51% - after about 2 hours).

    Before this, I never knew bad sectors could be recovered. I have no idea how long the drive will last but since we can’t stretch to a new drive at the moment, this is fine blessing. And all it cost me was nearly ten full days of my life.

    • Marked as answer by ChrisOfTheOT Tuesday, April 23, 2013 10:50 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by ChrisOfTheOT Saturday, May 18, 2013 1:40 PM
    Tuesday, April 23, 2013 10:42 AM
  • After much guffing around, and even more time, I have progressed to disappointed resignation: one drive is now removed, another is walking-wounded.

    HD scan discrepancies: As far as I understand it, Chkdsk focuses more on the software recorded on each drive, where SeaTools focuses on the physical state of each drive & platter surface. So, where Chkdsk says there’s a ‘bad sector’, it may mean that the data on that sector is erroneous or damaged but the actual disk surface is still okay.

    Seagate 2TB (still under guarantee from Seagate): I downloaded Ultimate Boot CD (http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/) but couldn’t use the much vaunted ‘Parted Magic’ as I have no mouse and the keyboard would not work with their GUI. I used one of the other HDD options (maybe ‘Partition Resizer’?) to cancel all the bad sector IDs. (It warned that no sectors would be mended, it was just a cosmetic adjustment, so to speak.) However, since the bad sector indicators were removed I’m assuming WHS will access all sectors okay (as SeaTools ‘Long Scan’ was clear). It’s been fine for two or three weeks now.

    Hitachi 1TB: No problems with this drive.

    Hitachi 500MB: No problems until the 17<sup>th</sup> of last month, then the ‘4KB in bad sectors’, above. Chkdsk sorted it. Then, a few days ago I got ‘337 CRC errors’. I’ve never heard of CRC errors (Cyclic Redundancy Check, apparently) but Chkdsk, removing & reformatting (etc.) couldn’t sort them. After much stress I’ve decided to ditch the drive as it got very slow to format and it’s the oldest, smallest drive. (Since our Shares folders are 600GB+, it’s not as useful as it might be.)

    Samsung 1.5TB: This remains the problem drive. It showed ‘4KB in bad sectors’ which Chkdsk couldn’t sort so I used DiskWizard to blitz it (above). It worked fine and Chkdsk continues to give it the all-clear but a couple of days ago I got a SMART warning. Unfortunately, there’s no indication what’s wrong. Since it’s a large drive & otherwise working okay, I’ve assigned it as WHS Backup drive. It’s still working fine but I assume it will die at some point. Still, as the backup it’ll get less work & when it goes, it’s easier/quicker to replace than a Shares drive.

    Not the ideal ending, but that’s life in a fallen universe. After some heavy Shares pruning we’ve still got 48% free space with duplication so we should be okay space wise – though if either of the main drives go down, it’ll be time consuming to sort. A right pain but everything is working now. Let’s hope it’s blessed with continuing trouble-free running for the next couple of years…

    Cheers,

    Chris

    P.S. This started me looking at new hard drives – and their guarantees. I’ll sort a new post about that as I don’t want to hijack my own thread – if that’s even possible?!



    • Edited by ChrisOfTheOT Monday, May 13, 2013 8:59 AM 'Now' changed to 'no' for 1TB drive (!)
    Saturday, May 11, 2013 9:55 AM
  • Consider the possibility that you have a driver issue, or a problem with the SATA controller in your server.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    • Marked as answer by ChrisOfTheOT Saturday, May 18, 2013 1:42 PM
    Saturday, May 11, 2013 12:55 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for your help (again) Ken - although this is not what I wanted to see first thing on a Monday morning! I'll have to Google & do a forums search on this as I've never had to deal with SATA controller problems. I'll guess at this point that you're refering to the drivers for the motherboard. (Why would they start to cause problems after two plus years?)

    I have an ASRock 880GMH/USB3 PDF manual in my folders so I'm guessing that's the one in the server. It's a place to start. I'm hoping driver updates are easy (i.e. from within Windows & just a clicky thing) otherwise, I'm heart broken.

    I should never have sold my Amiga...

    Cheers Ken,

    Chris

    Monday, May 13, 2013 9:06 AM
  • Hi Ken - I've checked the BIOS and the 'Onboard SATA Controller' mode is set to IDE. (I thought it was AHCI - not that I know much about it.) All the drives are SATA and are detected okay, in the correct ports: 1,2 and 5 (just because I needed some finger space!).

    The BIOS is the last available version from ASRock, and as far as I can tell, all the drivers are the latest too – except the USB 3 which I could never get to work. (No matter, I have no USB 3 drives.)

    Are there other drivers I should check? WHS specific ones, or something?

    Cheers,

    Chris

    Monday, May 13, 2013 2:12 PM
  • I forgot to say that all the drivers in Device Manager also seem kosher - no warnings or conflicts (not even the USB 3!).

    So, forgiving my humiliating ignorance for the moment, are we actually causing damage using the server? I had it turned off for few days but since we need it, I rebooted again. Should I leave it off until it's, erm, mended?

    Would upgrading to WHS 2011 be any use (new drivers, presumably)? Would installing that in AHCI mode (?!) solve the potential SATA controller issues? (I'm assuming that the motherboard isn't on the verge of exploding, or something... It is only two years old.)

    This is getting me down, to say the least!

    Cheers (he said bravely),

    Chris

    Tuesday, May 14, 2013 7:46 AM
  • More & more, & yet more research - because I obviously don't have a life (any more) - led me to purchase a new 4-port SATA (PCI-E) card. It'll be a couple of days. £20.

    I'm worried about drivers now but my cunning plan is to install the card with the (empty) 500GB drive attached and boot WHS. Maybe it'll say 'new hardware found' and I can install the drivers from the supplied disk... If (IF!) so, then I'll try and attach all the hard drives to the new card & reboot.

    Seems like a long shot, but what can I do?

    I'll let you know.

    Cheers,

    Chris

    P.S. Card says it's 3.0Gbps - then adds that only two ports are 3.0Gbps, the otherstwo are 'IDE speed'. No matter, as long as it works.

    Wednesday, May 15, 2013 4:56 PM
  • I note my first post was April 13<sup>th</sup>. Today is May 18<sup>th</sup> – five weeks of unbelievable hassle. I keep wondering if I should have invested in a NAS system instead…

    However, SATA card duly arrived – very quick delivery too, about 30 hours (God bless eBay!) – and was very easy to attach. (I still remember ripping my fingers to pieces on vice-like ISA connectors.) The clearest information about the card I found is here: http://www.sybausa.com/productInfo.php?iid=556. Apparently, it’s a bit cheap and nasty – I thought it was mid-range!

    To my huge surprise the card actually has it’s own BIOS which loads after the ASRock motherboard BIOS. It offers RAID configuration by hitting ‘Ctrl-J’ – which I just ignored as it was far to scary.

    My hopes of just whacking the card in and Windows correspondingly whacking in the driver were predictably naive. The horrible miniCD supplied has 50 or 60 different drivers and utilities and I couldn’t get any to work. (Except one, but I’ve no idea what it did. It certainly didn’t help WHS see the card.)

    I disconnected the main drive from the card and reconnected it to the motherboard & booted. Lots of ‘critical warnings’ from Connector, obviously, but it got me back to the RDC where Device Manager showed the RAID Controller as not working, much as expected.

    After an hour of two of Googling, I stumbled upon the SYBA USA site – never heard of them before – and to this post in their forums: http://www.sybausa.com/forumQuestionAndAnswer.php?qId=35&cId=4. I downloaded & unzipped the linked driver and just launched the Setup.exe from WHS desktop. It did the job, RAID Controller in Device Manager was happy again. Hurrah! I reconnected the main drive to SATA card.

    All okay then? Pah! And double Pah! On rebooting the server, all seemed fine until – nothing. Everything froze solid. I couldn’t even get a response from the directly connected keyboard.

    I disconnected the main drive from the card again and back to the motherboard & rebooted. I noticed a new icon in the Taskbar which was (something like) ‘JMB RAID Configurer’. Simple then, just click ‘Exit’… except the poxy Configurer reloads itself on reboot and has no option to disable.

    A couple more hours of Googling revealed a forum – can’t begin to remember which now – where one user said he installed a driver ‘from the floppy’, because that option didn’t install the RAID configurer. Hmm. What floppy? It turns out that there’s a folder called ‘Floppy32’ (and ‘Floppy64’) in the driver download (a ‘Readme’ says to copy all files to a floppy: I did a DVD as well). Therein is an INF file and lo! When I browsed to the Floppy32 folder from the ‘Update Driver’ option in Device Manager, it worked: under ‘SCSI and RAID controllers’ is ‘JMicron JMB36x controller’ (rather than the ‘RAID Controller’ as previously).

    Yabadoo.

    I reconnected the main drive to the SATA card and rebooted. Bootiful, so to speak… I am currently Chkdsking the 1.5TB because that’s still showing an unidentified SMART warning and I figure that if the SATA controller is pants on the motherboard (as Ken said), then Chkdsk may struggle to ‘repair’ anything. We’ll see. (I had wanted to use SeaTools but it can’t see the drives at all through the new SATA card.)

    Anyway, it’s just done a backup of my laptop so it seems to be working okay. I’ll leave it on over the weekend now.

    So, progress, hopefully!

    Cheers,

    Chris

    Saturday, May 18, 2013 1:41 PM
  • Well, it all runs okay. The mysterious SMART error for the Samsung 1.5TB drive still shows, though every status listing says ‘Healthy’. Unfortunately, SeaTools will not work with my SATA controller as it thinks it’s a pukka RAID controller. Also Samsung ES-Tool will not work – it detects the controller card correctly, but not the HDDs behind it. Samsung HUTIL said the drive was not compatible (maybe I should have used v1, but I’m too fed-up with it now.)

    (ViVARD seemed to show a single CRC error but the results were a jumble of numbers so I could be wrong! I think it showed 28000 hours of use too – about three years, I worked it out…)

    Anyway, since WHS is working, I’m just going to leave it ‘till the drive disintegrates. What a journey! Glad it’s over!

    Cheerio,

    Chris

    P.S. SY-PEX400013 on Amazon (US) for reviews: http://www.amazon.com/Syba-SY-PEX40013-Express-Controller-Chipset/dp/B002OEBO78/ref=pd_sim_sbs_pc_2. Note that the miniCD supplied with this card does NOT contain the driver – only the driver/configurer combo – which is very poorly rated by most reviewers. I could only find the actual driver from the SYBA USA links in my previous post (see ‘Download’ tab for v.xx.62.).

    Monday, May 20, 2013 11:36 AM
  • S.M.A.R.T. errors are often "toggles": something bad happens, or some threshold is reached, and the drive notifies you. The assumption is that you will replace the drive as soon as practical. In the case of Windows Home Server, ideally you would do this by adding a new drive to the storage pool, then removing the old drive from the storage pool.

    The drive status in Windows may not reflect the S.M.A.R.T. status; it really depends on the exact cause of the S.M.A.R.T. error and the various layers between the drive and Windows.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    Monday, May 20, 2013 7:42 PM
    Moderator
  • Okay Ken - thanks again. There seems little to do now except get a new drive. After looking at HDDs I was shocked to find so few manufactures (three!) and that 5-year guarantees are few and far between nowadays (promised post here: http://social.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/whshardware/thread/206c2970-4835-431c-8097-4c1225cb865e/#de55bc16-69db-4dd1-a147-8eb0be5da49e).

    Anyway, that's the next thing - probably in a couple of months (hoping the drive lasts that long).

    I've never hated computers so much as the last month or so. Since Windows XP, problems are so complicated I can’t sort them out without great difficulty. I look around our home and am terrified at the level of computerisation (TV, games console, server, AV - and laptops, of course). When it works, it’s unbelievably useful
    and helpful. When it breaks down, it eats your life away - even if you’ve got
    the money to just keep buying new.

    Interestingly, our computer spend is roughly the same as our motoring spend. How crazy is that? Interestingly too, when the car goes wrong, it usually takes a single day to repair, with no stress to me at all – because I never touch it.

    Bizarre.

    I could easily ditch the car and manage (Anna, my wife, does not agree though!), but computers have become essential. How I wish the stress-level of computer ownership was as comparable to the stress-level of car ownership! (Just like the financial commitment is).

    Just tuppence worth. (I’m honestly exhausted with it!)

    Thanks for your help though, Ken. Your advice over the last few years (and kariya’s and Olaf’s) has been invaluable. Thank you.

    Cheers,

    Chris

    Tuesday, May 21, 2013 9:00 AM
  • Replacing a drive: as long as it isn't the system drive (the one you originally installed on) and as long as it doesn't get worse, just add the new drive, then remove the old drive, using the controls in the console. Computer repairs in general are not for the faint of heart; I recommend strongly against people without a burning desire to solve hardware issues building their own computers because fixing them is so tough if you don't have enough knowledge to identify issues. And yes, every day we are becoming more and more computerized, integrated, and cloud-centric (How I hate "the cloud"; it's used to mean so many different things, by so many people, that it's meaningless).

    Cars: it's different in the US. Unless one lives in or very near a city, it's generally not practical for most people to really get around on public transit. (Though if more people would use public transit, that would change.) Where I live, there are horses next door, sheep, peacocks, and chickens across the street, goats, llamas and donkeys within a mile, and far too many groundhogs and <strike>rats on stilts</strike> deer. I would have to walk (or bicycle, or ride a mule) 8 miles to the nearest grocery store, which means I can't live without a car.

    Formatting: Formatting in the forums sucks in general, though there are some tricks one can play if one is particularly determined (and bored). Some of those tricks even survive storage in the giant database behind the forums. :) I highly recommend you try to avoid doing much on your iDevice, though; much as the editor sucks in a modern browser on a desktop or laptop computer, it's light years better than Safari on an iPad.


    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)

    Wednesday, May 22, 2013 12:11 AM
    Moderator
  • The (potentially) dodgy drive is the Server Backup drive so can be left 'unto death', or at least unto much more poorly, I feel.

    I agree about not building your own system, unless it's a hobby-type project or something. The problem is that even mainstream manufactured systems go wrong but the only offer of help (even under guarantee) is replacement of parts, not recovery or preservation of data. In other words, do it yourself or loose all data. (When I first set up WHS, I was under the impression that all data was always recoverable. I suppose I assumed - huge amounts of research not withstanding! - that the server backed it's own data up. In fact, I am fairly sure that was strongly implied in the MS blurb before WHS was released for sale.)

    Comparing cars again, imagine this scenario: I have spent weeks or months moving items from various locations in our car. One day the car breaks down and the dealer says he can replace broken parts, but it will require every item I have previously moved to be put back in it's original location. (Simplistic I know, but you get my point.)

    In real life, our local Ford dealer is happy to repair or upgrade our car in exchange for money, but our local computer shop - or national chain store - will only replace parts but also destroy all work done. (I note that it's not like that on the Starship Enterprise...)

    FYI: Here in South-West England, we have deer too. They come into our garden (and eat everything), and nearby we have either lamas or alpacas as well. No idea what the difference is. Looking forward to seeing rats on stilts though. (I used to have a pet rat called Maggie. This was in the early 1990s - all very Freudian...)

    As for formatting in bold with green lettering & highlighting. I could do that, if I wanted, I just can't be bothered right now...

    Anyway, nice talking to you Ken. I'm off to Google the difference between lamas and alpacas now I've got my life back.

    Cheers,

    Chris

    Wednesday, May 22, 2013 11:42 AM