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After completing MCITP, can I use MCSE title? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm studying for MCITP certificate.I saw a vacancy notice and they are asking for MCSE certificate.But I think now no one can get MCSE certification.

    I'm looking for a positive answer...

    thanks

    Monday, April 4, 2011 7:26 AM

Answers

  • Hi Supun,

    I would not use the MCSE title but you could certainly write replacement for MCSE or explain that you have the latest equivalent.

    Employees (particularly HR departments) are often behind on qualifiication changes.

    Kind Regards,

    Ozzy Geoff

    Monday, April 4, 2011 7:50 AM

All replies

  • Hi Supun,

    I would not use the MCSE title but you could certainly write replacement for MCSE or explain that you have the latest equivalent.

    Employees (particularly HR departments) are often behind on qualifiication changes.

    Kind Regards,

    Ozzy Geoff

    Monday, April 4, 2011 7:50 AM
  • You are not allowed to advertise a older certification title in place of your newer certification title. An MCPD cannot state he or she is also an MCSD, for example, just because MCPD is the newer replacement title.

    Just a thought - perhaps the potential employer has not yet upgraded their servers from Windows Server 2000 or 2003 to Windows Server 2008. An MCSE would be what they are looking for. By you asking these pointed questions about their current infrastructure, it may get you that first interview. If they do have the latest server OSs, be cautious not to insult anyone about their lacking knowledge of current Microsoft certification titles. ;)

    Incidently, the MCSE 2003 certification title is still achievable for those folks who support Windows Server 2003. Although this certification is for an older server operating system, it is acceptable to pass Windows Vista or Windows 7 client certifications to acheive the MCSE title. Learn more about the requirements here: http://www.microsoft.com/learning/en/us/certification/mcse.aspx#tab2

    Good luck on your certification goals!


    Best wishes, Davin Mickelson
    Monday, April 4, 2011 12:14 PM
    Answerer
  • Thanks Ozzy......

     

    Tuesday, April 19, 2011 4:42 PM
  • You are not allowed to advertise a older certification title in place of your newer certification title. An MCPD cannot state he or she is also an MCSD, for example, just because MCPD is the newer replacement title.

    While I understand this legally, and I even state (when I have the room):

    • Only MCTS/MCITP is available for Windows Server 2008 (MCSA/MCSE ends with 2003)

    When being brief, I have put down -- in quotes:

    • MCTS/MCITP 2008 (~'MCSA/MCSE 2008')

    For those head hunters who don't know about MCITP yet.

    Most of the time I just break it out separately, because I do have a MCSA/MCSE as well.  E.g., at the head of my current resume: 

    • Microsoft Certified IT Professional (MCITP, incl MCTS MTA) on Windows Server 2008 (replaces MCSA/MCSE on 2008)
    • Microsoft Certified System Engineer (MCSE, also MCSA, incl MCP) on Windows Server 2000, w/Security Specialty (MCSA/MCSE:Security)

    That way the head hunters will see the little letters in their scans.  E.g., even if I didn't have a MCSA/MCSE, the first bullet there still includes the letters after the MCITP (while not saying I have a MCSE)

    I also have a similar problem with the RHCA.  Even fewer head hunters know what a RHCA is (while it's +5x the number of hours and days of testing beyond the RHCE).

    • Red Hat Certified Architect (RHCA, includes RHCDS RHCE) on Enterprise Linux 5

    There's always a way to accommodate ignorance, without stating something that is untrue.  You also don't want to overwhelm people with acronyms, so I find this approach -- using the highest-level certification, and then just putting the other letters as "also/incl", is best.




    • Edited by TheBS Monday, December 26, 2011 4:30 PM
    Monday, December 26, 2011 4:14 PM
  • MCSE or MCSA was used for around 17 years, since Windows NT 3.51, as far as I can remember. I believe that many companies use the MC** as an indication of knowledge on Microsoft Platforms. You can use the certification acronim where you are certified as an indication of your knowledge in the platform.

    Alfredo Arizaleta, MCT, MCSE Windows NT 4/Windows 2000, MCSA Windows 2003, MCITP: SA, MCTS Windows 7

     


    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no express or implied warranties or rights.
    Tuesday, December 27, 2011 9:28 PM
  • I was under the impression you can use MCSE forever regardless if you are MCITP.  The MCITP certs DO expire, but MCSE does not.

     

    Timothy Atwood

    • Marked as answer by Supun Kaushal Sunday, December 16, 2012 1:18 PM
    • Unmarked as answer by Supun Kaushal Sunday, December 16, 2012 1:18 PM
    Wednesday, December 28, 2011 8:38 PM
  • I was under the impression you can use MCSE forever regardless if you are MCITP.  The MCITP certs DO expire, but MCSE does not.

     

    Timothy Atwood


    This is correct.  If you actually earned the MCSE in WinNT, 2000 or 2003, that certification doesn't expire.  The MCTS and MCITP designations expire when Microsoft no longer supports that particular product. 

    As a side note, if you earned the MCSE and also the MCITP, you can show both.

    Wednesday, December 28, 2011 9:58 PM
    Answerer
  • MCSE or MCSA was used for around 17 years, since Windows NT 3.51, as far as I can remember.

    The MCSA was introduced late in the 2000 track, I believe in 2001-2002 or so.  I remember for awhile the head hunters started asking for it because it meant you were familiar with AD.
    Sunday, January 8, 2012 2:16 PM