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Starting from scratch: recommended mobo/cpu RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm starting to think it is time to gut my system and start over.  My drives are relatively new, but the motherboard has seen better days.  If you were starting over,  what mobo/cpu combo would you recommend?  It doesn't need to be a very high end box.. just enough to server as a backup box for 2 machines and occasionally stream media to a single box. 
    • Moved by Ken WarrenModerator Sunday, October 12, 2008 1:16 PM hardware question (Moved from Windows Home Server Software to Windows Home Server Hardware)
    Sunday, October 12, 2008 4:44 AM

Answers

  • Whenever I go diving for a mobo, I always try to get as many "future use" features as I can.  Not necessarily a mobo with all the bells and whisles, but instead a mobo with a chipset that will last 3 to 4 years with the latest CPUs.
     
    I recommend hunting for a mobo with 8 sata ports, DDR2, and at least 3 PCIe slots - to allow for future upgradability.  I've seen a few ASUS boards for $80 to $90 that support the Intel 1333mhz FSB.  There's one (don't quote me, P5Q PLus?) that does 1333/1600mhz FSB - allowing for future CPU upgrades.  All around the P35 and P45 Intel chipsets if I remember, allowing for about 8 to 16 GB of ram.

    The interesting part about the P5Q and 1600mhz FSB stats, is that it supports the dirt-cheap older DDR2 memory.  So, spend $40 for 2 GB of ram, a low-end Core2 cpu for $120, and the mobo.

    If you really want a future-proof board, the P5Q upper models also have 5 PCIe slots (two x16, three x1) - for about $140.

    Eric A. Duncan http://eduncan911.com
    Tuesday, October 14, 2008 8:14 PM

All replies

  • dwelzel said:

    I'm starting to think it is time to gut my system and start over.  My drives are relatively new, but the motherboard has seen better days.  If you were starting over,  what mobo/cpu combo would you recommend?  It doesn't need to be a very high end box.. just enough to server as a backup box for 2 machines and occasionally stream media to a single box. 


    This particular forum is for WHS software questions.  You should post your question in the Windows Home Server Hardware forum.
    Sunday, October 12, 2008 5:03 AM
    Moderator
  • Whenever I go diving for a mobo, I always try to get as many "future use" features as I can.  Not necessarily a mobo with all the bells and whisles, but instead a mobo with a chipset that will last 3 to 4 years with the latest CPUs.
     
    I recommend hunting for a mobo with 8 sata ports, DDR2, and at least 3 PCIe slots - to allow for future upgradability.  I've seen a few ASUS boards for $80 to $90 that support the Intel 1333mhz FSB.  There's one (don't quote me, P5Q PLus?) that does 1333/1600mhz FSB - allowing for future CPU upgrades.  All around the P35 and P45 Intel chipsets if I remember, allowing for about 8 to 16 GB of ram.

    The interesting part about the P5Q and 1600mhz FSB stats, is that it supports the dirt-cheap older DDR2 memory.  So, spend $40 for 2 GB of ram, a low-end Core2 cpu for $120, and the mobo.

    If you really want a future-proof board, the P5Q upper models also have 5 PCIe slots (two x16, three x1) - for about $140.

    Eric A. Duncan http://eduncan911.com
    Tuesday, October 14, 2008 8:14 PM
  • Hello,
    if you are talking about a motherboard for your Windows Home Server, there are some points to consider:
    - CPU architecture (Intel/AMD), sockets
    - number of storage connectors
    - (Is there a connector for a floppy drive to feed drivers, if necessary?)
    - avaiibility of drivers for Windows Server 2003 or at least Windows XP
    - Video on board with VGA or better DVI out
    - a known maker, which supports models a bit longer (for Bios and driver updates)
    - the amount of memory supported
    In one of my assembled WHS machines I use an Asus board for Intel socket 775 with VGA out, in another system an Intel mainboard.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Wednesday, October 15, 2008 11:13 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,
    Also, further down the page in the Hardware forum, is a 17-page thread titled  'What's in your Server'  Which has some info regarding contributors experiences with different systems.

    Colin






    If anyone answers your query successfully, please mark it as 'Helpful', to guide other users.
    Wednesday, October 15, 2008 2:51 PM
    Moderator