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Kernal Mode's an operation's. RRS feed

Answers

  • Sabarinathan,

    Not sure where you found the reference, but the term "supervisor mode" often gets used instead of "kernel mode"; for "user mode" you often see "application mode".

    The two modes are different levels of privilege available on an x86 chip running in "protected" mode. There are 4 levels altogether. The levels are used by several operating systems, including Linux and Windows. For example, one use is to reserve some instructions and operations for use only by the kernel.

    Kernel mode vs. user mode is discussed in the opening chapter of "Microsoft Windows Internals" that is distributed as part of the Windows Academic Program.

    Thanks,

     

    Tuesday, June 20, 2006 12:17 AM
  • ring0 --->  kernel

    ring3---> user

    Programming_the_microsoft_windows_driver_model

    Tuesday, August 1, 2006 2:46 AM

All replies

  • Sabarinathan,

    Not sure where you found the reference, but the term "supervisor mode" often gets used instead of "kernel mode"; for "user mode" you often see "application mode".

    The two modes are different levels of privilege available on an x86 chip running in "protected" mode. There are 4 levels altogether. The levels are used by several operating systems, including Linux and Windows. For example, one use is to reserve some instructions and operations for use only by the kernel.

    Kernel mode vs. user mode is discussed in the opening chapter of "Microsoft Windows Internals" that is distributed as part of the Windows Academic Program.

    Thanks,

     

    Tuesday, June 20, 2006 12:17 AM
  • ring0 --->  kernel

    ring3---> user

    Programming_the_microsoft_windows_driver_model

    Tuesday, August 1, 2006 2:46 AM
  • Actually , Intel provides 4 level of protection , most operating systems do not make use of all of them . Refer the Intel Manuals , basically Volume 3.  But that is an implementation issue . Superviser mode conceptually means that it can perform  many operations that are not permitted in user mode .

    Wednesday, June 18, 2008 12:27 PM
  • If I recall this right, Supervisor Mode refers back to the VMS operating system and is about the same as Kernel Mode.

    There are some design principles that Windows shares with VMS. However, this might lead to another discussion....

     

    Alex

    Friday, August 1, 2008 11:04 PM
  •  

    Yes Alex,

    you are correct , the windows operating system, specifically Windows NT  borrows some principles from the VMS  operating system .

     

     

    Regards

    Sandeep Mathew

    Monday, August 4, 2008 4:15 AM