locked
Replacement of hdd's RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I know this has been queried elsewhere, and I'm unable to add my vote for the feature, as I've not been enrolled into the beta program yet, but I have the same issue as several others.

    3 x Idential ide drives. Bad blocks  on drive one, and demigrator is crashing all the time due to this I guess.

    My question is, are the disks in the "server storage" view presented in the same order they are in disk management, i.e. 0, 1, 2, 3? That way I know which drive to pull. If no one is around to answer, I think I'll try a disaster recovery scenario by just yanking the faulty drive in the machine anyway. I know which physical drive it is, but I was going to right click, 'remove' in the storage view first, if I can tell which is which.

    Thanks.
    Monday, April 16, 2007 5:55 PM

Answers

  • The answer to your question is "no". They are presented in alphabetical order. The piece of information used for sorting appears to be a drive info field that is commonly (but not always) used for manufacturer's model information. So in your case, the drives undoubtedly appear the same.

    In this case, I would guess (but it's only a guess, and if your WHS dies, it's on you) that they are presented in the same order the BIOS presents them in, which should be primary master, primary slave, secondary master, secondary slave, I believe.

    Regarding the beta program: if you aren't yet accepted into the beta program, then I wonder where you got the software? I can guess, and if I'm right, you have a more recent build than beta 2, with (apparently, from some online posts) many minor and major changes. There's a chance that any answer you get here will be wrong because these forums are devoted to the publicly released beta, which is over two months old at this point.
    Monday, April 16, 2007 6:27 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • The answer to your question is "no". They are presented in alphabetical order. The piece of information used for sorting appears to be a drive info field that is commonly (but not always) used for manufacturer's model information. So in your case, the drives undoubtedly appear the same.

    In this case, I would guess (but it's only a guess, and if your WHS dies, it's on you) that they are presented in the same order the BIOS presents them in, which should be primary master, primary slave, secondary master, secondary slave, I believe.

    Regarding the beta program: if you aren't yet accepted into the beta program, then I wonder where you got the software? I can guess, and if I'm right, you have a more recent build than beta 2, with (apparently, from some online posts) many minor and major changes. There's a chance that any answer you get here will be wrong because these forums are devoted to the publicly released beta, which is over two months old at this point.
    Monday, April 16, 2007 6:27 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks.  I guess I'll just pull the drive rather than attempt to remove on in the console as that might be the wrong one.

    In answer to your question, this was downloaded via the MS site. We have MSDN and a campus agreement. My own personal login is not enrolled in the beta program though I applied for it to get my own login to use this at home, hence my comment.  I'm not sure if this is a newer build or not.

    Just out of interest, where did you think I got it?  Not from dubious sources I hope!
    Monday, April 16, 2007 6:56 PM
  • If at all possible, identify the drive first and remove it using the console. Drive Extender will almost certainly choke on a simple disconnect.
    Monday, April 16, 2007 7:16 PM
    Moderator
  • I know that this is an old post, but in case anyone is paying attention... I have been playing with this a lot and here's what I've found out:

    The drive order is controlled by entries in the registry stored here:

       HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows Home Server\Storage Manager\Disks

    Under that key there will be one key for each drive designated by a big ugly number. These numbers seem to be generated by the operating system when a drive is installed. I'm sure there is some rhyme or reason as to how they are generated, but to those of us who aren't fluent in binary, they are seemingly created at random. When I messed my drive up (explaination below), and had to re-add the drive, the system had created a different number for the same physical disk. I have three drives installed in my server so my entries look like this:

       3a5497d2-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
       6e25fba5-0000-0000-0000-000000000000
       81ad0726-0000-0000-0000-000000000000

    Under each one of these keys is another key called "Attributes". Inside "Attributes" you'll find the entry for "ManufactureName". Changing that entry will change the way they are displayed in the Home Server console, rename them to whatever you want. Renaming them, however, will not change the order in which they are displayed (although it is much nicer, I very much suggest it). They ARE listed in alphabetical order, but it's alphabetical order of the registry key names! Not only that, but they seem to be displayed in descending order. Which means in my case, the drive corresponding to the registry key above that starts with "81ad0726..." is displayed at the top of the list in the home server console and the one starting with "3a5497d2..." is at the bottom.

    You can change those big ugly numbers to reorder the list if you like. As far as I've seen there is only two places in the registry where those numbers appear. One is the registry entry above (of course). The other is located here:

       HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows Home Server\Storage Manager\Volumes

    Inside the Volumes key there will be more keys designated by big ugly numbers, presumably corresponding to the specific volumes created on those physical disks. Expand each key to look for a subkey with the same name as the keys listed in the "Disks" section above (actually, it's probably best to just search the entire registry, but that's the only two places that need to be changed. Beware the "SystemName" attribute which may be the same number...see below). If you want to reorder the drives, then change the name of the registry key in both locations. Probably best to make the change as simple as possible. In my case, I changed "0e25fba5..." to "6e25fba5...". I only changed the first number to an arbitrary number between 3 and 8, so that when I rebooted my system, the registry keys will be reordered in the order that I wanted to see them in. Make all your changes at once, then they will take effect after a reboot.

    I don't think changing those just those keys will cause any serious problems. I say "think" because the first time I did it, I also changed an attribute called "SystemName" (located when you click directly on one of the ugly key names under the "Disks" section). "SystemName" looks just like the name of the key itself, so I assumed I needed to change both. I wasn't paying enough attention, they are actually different numbers. Well, changing that "SystemName" key is a much bigger problem. When I rebooted, the system didn't recognize the disk that I had changed and I had to end up re-adding (thereby reformatting) it back into the pool (I only have dummy data on there right now, so I didn't lose anything. But beware if you do have live data on your server!). It also seemed to corrupt the backup database which needed to be repaired (and repaired successfully), and it messed with the data that was stored on that drive, of course. I am planning on trying it again, just so I know for sure that changing the "SystemName" attribute was the cause of all my troubles and not the key names themselves (I also want to try re-ordering the system drive just to see if there are issues with moving that drive around). But if you're like me and you're just not content with leaving well enough alone, and you don't have any data on your disks you're not willing to risk losing, then this reg hack does work. For me it was kind of a painful lesson, but it turned out ok.

    If anyone cares, I'll post the results of my second test....changing the order of the system drive and NOT changing the "SystemName" attribute. If I'm right, then the process should go smoothly without any corrupted data inbetween.

    UPDATE: I have confirmed that changing the "SystemName" attribute was the sole cause of my troubles before. I tried renaming the just keys located in "disks" and the matching "volumes" section mentioned above, including the system drive, and it will reorder the drives without error. Anyone willing to edit the registry should feel confident that following the instructions above will not damage their operating system.



    Don't listen to me, I only pretend like I know what I'm doing ;-)
    Friday, October 17, 2008 5:03 PM