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Best books to get at the level to create an OS RRS feed

  • Question

  • Ok I know it's very hard to create an OS but I just can't hold it.I mean Bill Gates had to start from somewhere didn't he? Ofcourse,I'm not planning to create anything very advanced,I just wanna get at that level where I can make a very small text based OS.

     

    I would appreciate if someone would post a list of books to get me from the beginning to the level I want.

    My status now: I just started learning MFC,so yes I work with c++.

     

    Thursday, January 12, 2012 12:09 AM

Answers

  • Hi Turda,

    I would suggest to check out Minix and get the book from Andrew Tannenbaum. Then you get a complete view on operating systems and you can start developing your own operating system from there.

    It also has the big advantage, that you can start simply by changeing Minix before you start the development of your own kernel. (Linux started that way, too!). That way you can ignore some parts e.g. the loader and simply use what you get from Minix.

    With kind regards,

    Konrad

    Friday, January 13, 2012 1:42 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • I'm not aware of any books however a quick search using Google (developing OS book) found a number of books and other related material.  Here's an example of a book http://www.amazon.com/Developing-32-Bit-Operating-System-Cd-Rom/dp/0672306557
    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Please mark answered if I've answered your question and vote for it as helpful to help other user's find a solution quicker
    Thursday, January 12, 2012 11:12 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Turda,

    I would suggest to check out Minix and get the book from Andrew Tannenbaum. Then you get a complete view on operating systems and you can start developing your own operating system from there.

    It also has the big advantage, that you can start simply by changeing Minix before you start the development of your own kernel. (Linux started that way, too!). That way you can ignore some parts e.g. the loader and simply use what you get from Minix.

    With kind regards,

    Konrad

    Friday, January 13, 2012 1:42 PM
    Answerer