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Unable to Validate XP with Windows Geniune Advantage Tool RRS feed

  • Question

  • Problem started that PC Installed WGA Tool, but gives me blank screen when trying to validate. I stumbled accross someones posting that gave a link to a diagnostic tool, which gave me the following report:

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):

    -----------------------------------------

    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Status: License store error

    Validation Code: 12

    Cached Validation Code: N/A

    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-QJG37-8HBKY-FH62B

    Windows Product Key Hash: Q4xZvDNqIhNihR6i9rzPxBeQ9YY=

    Windows Product ID: 55274-640-8249084-23390

    Windows Product ID Type: 1

    Windows License Type: Volume

    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro

    ID: {320120C9-03CF-471E-82ED-F6F0E462F501}(3)

    Is Admin: Yes

    TestCab: 0x0

    LegitcheckControl ActiveX: Registered, 1.9.42.0

    Signed By: Microsoft

    Product Name: N/A

    Architecture: N/A

    Build lab: N/A

    TTS Error: N/A

    Validation Diagnostic: 025D1FF3-230-1_63BB5E84-487-80004005_E2AD56EA-85-80004005_16E0B333-89-80004005_78155E4D-232-80004005

    Resolution Status: N/A

     

    Vista WgaER Data-->

    ThreatID(s): N/A

    Version: N/A

     

    Windows XP Notifications Data-->

    Cached Result: 12

    File Exists: No

    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

     

    OGA Notifications Data-->

    Cached Result: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    Version: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGAExec.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGAAddin.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

     

    OGA Data-->

    Office Status: 109 N/A

    OGA Version: Registered, 2.0.48.0

    Signed By: Microsoft

    Office Diagnostics: 025D1FF3-230-1

     

    Browser Data-->

    Proxy settings: N/A

    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Win32)

    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\IEXPLORE.exe

    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt

    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled

    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed

    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled

    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled

    Active scripting: Allowed

    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

     

    File Scan Data-->

     

    Other data-->

    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>{320120C9-03CF-471E-82ED-F6F0E462F501}</UGUID><Version>1.9.0027.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro</OS><Architecture>x32</Architecture><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-FH62B</PKey><PID>55274-640-8249084-23390</PID><PIDType>1</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-1645522239-152049171-725345543</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>NVIDIA</Manufacturer><Model>AWRDACPI</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Phoenix Technologies, LTD</Manufacturer><Version>6.00 PG</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="2"/><Date>20051020000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>826B381701844066</HWID><UserLCID>1C09</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>South Africa Standard Time(GMT+02:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/><GANotification/></MachineData><Software><Office><Result>109</Result><Products/><Applications/></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

     

    Licensing Data-->

    N/A

     

    Windows Activation Technologies-->

    N/A

     

    HWID Data-->

    N/A

     

    OEM Activation 1.0 Data-->

    BIOS string matches: no

    Marker string from BIOS: N/A

    Marker string from OEMBIOS.DAT: N/A, hr = 0x80004005

     

    OEM Activation 2.0 Data-->

    N/A

    On the sticker with the product key it says "Windows XP Professional 1-2CPU OEM Software.  Interestingly enough, someone on this forum told me it reports back as a 'Volume License'.  I have the original XP disc, booklet and code in my posession, so from everything I can see, this is not a Volume Installation.  Does this mean I have a 'new' problem as in Product Key reporting incorrectly?

    I am stumped....

    Tx

    Marsha

    Thursday, March 31, 2011 6:12 PM

Answers

  • Hello MadCatSA,

    Here is a snippet of your mgadiag report:

    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Status: License store error

    Validation Code: 12

    Cached Validation Code: N/A

    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-QJG37-8HBKY-FH62B

    Windows Product Key Hash: Q4xZvDNqIhNihR6i9rzPxBeQ9YY=

    Windows Product ID: 55274-640-8249084-23390

    Windows Product ID Type: 1

    Windows License Type: Volume

    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro

     

    The installation of XP pro currently on your computer is a Volume Licensing version of XP Pro, as reported by the mgadiag report.

    If the OEM licensing kit (the installation disc and the product key printed on the Certificate of Authenticity [CoA]) installed this particular installation of XP Pro onto your computer, then the only conclusion to be drawn is that the licensing kit is a counterfeit.

    So let's confirm:

    1.  First, confirm that the part of the product key revealed by the mgadiag report  *****-*****-QJG37-8HBKY-FH62B   is identical to the corresponding part of the product key printed on the CoA that came with your OEM licensing kit.

    2.  Next, confirm that the hologram installation disc is portraying itself as a systembuilder/OEM disc by verifying that is has this engraved in the uper left quadrant:  "For distribution with a new PC only.  For product support, contact the manufacturer of the PC."

    3.  We already know from your description that the CoA is portraying itself as an OEM CoA.  Please confirm that the second line of the CoA states "OEM Product" or "OEM Software."

    4.  You noted that you received the other part of an OEM licensing kit, the thin blue User Guide pamphlet.

     

    OK, now we're going to play detective:

    1.  Insert the disc in a computer, and navigate to the \i386 folder on the disc.  Look for a small text file called setupp.ini.  This has two sections.  Please post the second section in your response.  We are looking at the last three characters of the PID=value line.  A genuine OEM disc would have "OEM" as the last three characters.  It's likely your disc, which contains not OEM bits but volume licensing bits, will have either "270" as the last three chareacters, or a number from "640" thru "649" as the last three characters.

    2.  Look VERY closely at the disc itself, paying special attention to the hologram.  A genuine disc's hologram is actually embedded within the plastic of the CD itself.  It's likely your disc, which is a counterfeit, has a very thin hologram label affixed to the top surface.  You may need to use a sharp object like a knife or a straight pin to feel the edge of the label.

    3.  Look VERY closely at the User Guide pamphlet.  Most counterfeits have at least several misspellings in the printed text.

    4.  Look VERY closely at the CoA.  The security tape should be interwoven within the layers of the CoA paper rather than just underneath it.

    5.  For more examples of real and fake materials see www.howtotell.com

    Friday, April 1, 2011 3:38 AM

All replies

  • "MadCatSA" wrote in message news:cb645389-b412-4ad1-8792-f9390f2bfc0d...

    Problem started that PC Installed WGA Tool, but gives me blank screen when trying to validate. I stumbled accross someones posting that gave a link to a diagnostic tool, which gave me the following report:

    Diagnostic Report (1.9.0027.0):

    -----------------------------------------

    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Status: License store error

    Validation Code: 12

    Cached Validation Code: N/A

    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-QJG37-8HBKY-FH62B

    Windows Product Key Hash: Q4xZvDNqIhNihR6i9rzPxBeQ9YY=

    Windows Product ID: 55274-640-8249084-23390

    Windows Product ID Type: 1

    Windows License Type: Volume

    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro

    ID: {320120C9-03CF-471E-82ED-F6F0E462F501}(3)

     

     

    On the sticker with the product key it says "Windows XP Professional 1-2CPU OEM Software.  Interestingly enough, someone on this forum told me it reports back as a 'Volume License'.  I have the original XP disc, booklet and code in my posession, so from everything I can see, this is not a Volume Installation.  Does this mean I have a 'new' problem as in Product Key reporting incorrectly?

    I am stumped....

    Tx

    Marsha

    Yes, Your Product Key is a Volume one - which is not available except in bulk, and cannot be re-sold.
    This implies that your copy of Windows is not genuine, or was reinstalled by a lazy or incompetent techie.
    Is the Key shown by the report the same as the one on your sticker?
    If not, try changing the Product Key  using the Product Key Update Tool from here..
    This will scan your system and hopefully fix the Licensing store error at the same time as changing the Key.

     
     

    --


    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Friday, April 1, 2011 3:29 AM
    Moderator
  • Hello MadCatSA,

    Here is a snippet of your mgadiag report:

    Windows Validation Data-->

    Validation Status: License store error

    Validation Code: 12

    Cached Validation Code: N/A

    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-QJG37-8HBKY-FH62B

    Windows Product Key Hash: Q4xZvDNqIhNihR6i9rzPxBeQ9YY=

    Windows Product ID: 55274-640-8249084-23390

    Windows Product ID Type: 1

    Windows License Type: Volume

    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.3.0.pro

     

    The installation of XP pro currently on your computer is a Volume Licensing version of XP Pro, as reported by the mgadiag report.

    If the OEM licensing kit (the installation disc and the product key printed on the Certificate of Authenticity [CoA]) installed this particular installation of XP Pro onto your computer, then the only conclusion to be drawn is that the licensing kit is a counterfeit.

    So let's confirm:

    1.  First, confirm that the part of the product key revealed by the mgadiag report  *****-*****-QJG37-8HBKY-FH62B   is identical to the corresponding part of the product key printed on the CoA that came with your OEM licensing kit.

    2.  Next, confirm that the hologram installation disc is portraying itself as a systembuilder/OEM disc by verifying that is has this engraved in the uper left quadrant:  "For distribution with a new PC only.  For product support, contact the manufacturer of the PC."

    3.  We already know from your description that the CoA is portraying itself as an OEM CoA.  Please confirm that the second line of the CoA states "OEM Product" or "OEM Software."

    4.  You noted that you received the other part of an OEM licensing kit, the thin blue User Guide pamphlet.

     

    OK, now we're going to play detective:

    1.  Insert the disc in a computer, and navigate to the \i386 folder on the disc.  Look for a small text file called setupp.ini.  This has two sections.  Please post the second section in your response.  We are looking at the last three characters of the PID=value line.  A genuine OEM disc would have "OEM" as the last three characters.  It's likely your disc, which contains not OEM bits but volume licensing bits, will have either "270" as the last three chareacters, or a number from "640" thru "649" as the last three characters.

    2.  Look VERY closely at the disc itself, paying special attention to the hologram.  A genuine disc's hologram is actually embedded within the plastic of the CD itself.  It's likely your disc, which is a counterfeit, has a very thin hologram label affixed to the top surface.  You may need to use a sharp object like a knife or a straight pin to feel the edge of the label.

    3.  Look VERY closely at the User Guide pamphlet.  Most counterfeits have at least several misspellings in the printed text.

    4.  Look VERY closely at the CoA.  The security tape should be interwoven within the layers of the CoA paper rather than just underneath it.

    5.  For more examples of real and fake materials see www.howtotell.com

    Friday, April 1, 2011 3:38 AM