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Invalid XP after computer fixed RRS feed

  • Question

  • Two years ago my Advent 3307 motherboard blew up and the repair guy put on Windows XP professional .. my XP was the home version ... but it seemed silly to complain at the time. Anyway, the website "The TechGuys", PC Service Call said to paste this diagnostic stuff on here for help ... at least that's what I think it said!  Sorry ... I'm a computer user, not computer techie ...! Hope it makes sense to you! Thank you ...

    Diagnostic Report (1.7.0012.0):
    -----------------------------------------
    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Blocked VLK
    Detailed Status: N/A
    Windows Product Key: *****-*****-4RHJG-83M4Y-7X9GW
    Windows Product Key Hash: 5CG2aCaHENU8LMWFFoQ/184emQ0=
    Windows Product ID: 55274-649-6478953-23626
    Windows Product ID Type: 1
    Windows License Type: Volume
    Windows OS version: 5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro
    ID: de827618-118d-47ec-a076-588984853130
    Is Admin: Yes
    AutoDial: No
    Registry: 0x0
    WGA Version: Registered, 1.7.36.0
    Signed By: Microsoft
    Product Name: N/A
    Architecture: N/A
    Build lab: N/A
    TTS Error: N/A
    Validation Diagnostic:
    Resolution Status: N/A

    Notifications Data-->
    Cached Result: N/A
    File Exists: No
    Version: N/A
    WgaTray.exe Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    WgaLogon.dll Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002

    OGA Data-->
    Office Status: 100 Genuine
    OGA Version: Failed to retrieve file version. - 0x80070002
    Signed By: N/A, hr = 0x80070002
    Office Diagnostics: FCEE394C-3178-80070002

    Browser Data-->
    Proxy settings: http=127.0.0.1:83
    User Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 6.0; Win32)
    Default Browser: C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer\iexplore.exe
    Download signed ActiveX controls: Prompt
    Download unsigned ActiveX controls: Disabled
    Run ActiveX controls and plug-ins: Allowed
    Initialize and script ActiveX controls not marked as safe: Disabled
    Allow scripting of Internet Explorer Webbrowser control: Disabled
    Active scripting: Allowed
    Script ActiveX controls marked as safe for scripting: Allowed

    File Scan Data-->

    Other data-->
    Office Details: <GenuineResults><MachineData><UGUID>de827618-118d-47ec-a076-588984853130</UGUID><Version>1.7.0012.0</Version><OS>5.1.2600.2.00010100.2.0.pro</OS><PKey>*****-*****-*****-*****-7X9GW</PKey><PID>55274-649-6478953-23626</PID><PIDType>1</PIDType><SID>S-1-5-21-343818398-1547161642-839522115</SID><SYSTEM><Manufacturer>GBT___</Manufacturer><Model>AWRDACPI</Model></SYSTEM><BIOS><Manufacturer>Award Software International, Inc.</Manufacturer><Version>F5</Version><SMBIOSVersion major="2" minor="3"/><Date>20031027000000.000000+000</Date></BIOS><HWID>E42F3B8F0184A05F</HWID><UserLCID>0809</UserLCID><SystemLCID>0409</SystemLCID><TimeZone>Romance Standard Time(GMT+01:00)</TimeZone><iJoin>0</iJoin><SBID><stat>3</stat><msppid></msppid><name></name><model></model></SBID><OEM/></MachineData>   <Software><Office><Result>100</Result><Products><Product GUID="{90170409-6000-11D3-8CFE-0050048383C9}"><LegitResult>100</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft FrontPage 2002</Name><Ver>10</Ver><Val>AB6ABB259B60B93</Val><Hash>Jk8DK6xvLUtRXlMQ1fh16Dey8yg=</Hash><Pid>54196-752-5513696-16325</Pid><PidType>1</PidType></Product><Product GUID="{91110409-6000-11D3-8CFE-0150048383C9}"><LegitResult>100</LegitResult><Name>Microsoft Office Professional Edition 2003</Name><Ver>11</Ver><Val>25D4CD14EC46D78</Val><Hash>D1BUT+3Yf3ee7hV+OhDWron8xfw=</Hash><Pid>70145-700-1549432-57557</Pid><PidType>1</PidType></Product></Products></Office></Software></GenuineResults> 

     

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 7:03 PM

Answers

  •  Cencerrita

     

    Thank you for posting your diagnostic information and posting on the thread. Diagnostic results help our team find resolutions. I have extracted a portion of your diagnostic results to review with you.

     

    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Blocked VLK

    WGA Version: Registered, 1.7.36.0
    Signed By: Microsoft

     

    I am sorry to hear about the problem your currently experiencing. I can see right away what the issue is with Windows XP operating system and why it is not passing validation.  Unfortunately, the product key used to install the operating system is a Volume License Key (VLK) that has been blocked per the request of the legal VLK holder.  As a rule, VL editions of either an Operating System and/or Office should not be sold to individual consumers. Businesses, schools and governments normally use VL editions for flexibility in installing many computers. Also, Volume Licenses for Windows XP and version of MS Office are Upgrade licenses ONLY and cannot be used as the original or base license for a new computer.

    This is why you were seeing the "Software Counterfeiting" messages on your computer, because the current installation of XP Pro is an unauthorized installation. In any case, please uninstall the non-genuine installation of the operating system to alleviate any complications which may arise from the non-genuine status of your system. As a customer there are options available to you for a resolution. First, if this comes as a total surprise, please go back to where you purchased the software and let them know it is a counterfeit copy and demand they immediately reimburse you and/or provide a Genuine Copy which was originally paid for. Print a copy of the diagnostic report so you may show them proof for the 114 Blocked VLK statuses. Second, if you purchased this copy of XP from a reseller or retailer, you are a victim and should report this piracy to Microsoft. Microsoft legal will follow up on all leads provided. Reporting piracy to Microsoft will help alleviate others in becoming victims such as yourself. You may be eligible for a complimentary replacement copy if you were sold a high quality counterfeit copy of Office.  For details on the ways to “Get Genuine”, see the web page that outlined your validation failure details or http://www.microsoft.com/genuine.  It will provide all of the possible steps which you can take.

    The key installed on this computer was not assigned by Microsoft. The key is counterfeit and was most likely generated by a non-sanctioned key generator. The product key found on your computer has been detected on multiple computers. Product keys are only allowed to be used on one computer unless otherwise specified in the end user licensing agreement.

     

    Counterfeiters have been known to sell computers with Windows installed, all using the same product key, to unsuspecting consumers. Again, you may be eligible for a complimentary replacement copy if you were sold a high quality counterfeit copy of Office. Please review and follow the guidance @ http://www.microsoft.com/genuine on how to become genuine.

     

    I am sorry to hear about your situation. Please don't hesitate re-posting if you need further assistance.


    Thank you
    Stephen Holm
    WGA Forum Manager

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 9:26 PM
  • Cencerrita,

     

    Right now, your computer has a Volume Licensing edition of XP Pro installed (Line 8), and that installation was done with a now-blocked Volume Licensing Key (VLK) (Line 2).  VLKs are blocked by Microsoft at the request of the original keyholder for such reasons as the key was lost, stolen, compromised, misused, or expired.  Also, MS may have blocked the key if it notices a pattern of misuse, ie, more installations of XP using that key than authorized.

    As a rule, VL editions of XP should not be sold to individual consumers.  Businesses, schools and gov'ts normally use VL editions for flexibility in installing many computers.  Also, a Volume License for XP is an upgrade-only license and can never be used as the original or base license for XP on a computer.

    If you search the forum for the part of the VLK reported by the mgadiag utility, 4RHJG-83M4Y-7X9GW, you will see that over three dozen other posters have submitted reports with that same blocked VLK

    This is why you were seeing the "software counterfeiting" messages on your computer, because the current installation of XP is an unauthorized installation.

    Some Good News:  The installation of Office 2003 on the computer is showing as  Genuine!

    Next, look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer, or with your Windows retail purchase, to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticty (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or another version of Windows?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  See this page for reference:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    Thursday, May 17, 2007 8:39 PM
  • Thank you for you helpful reply:

    There is a COA stuck on the side, it is:

    1) Windows XP Home Edition

    2) No OEM

    3) DSG Retail Ltd (The computer was bought from PC World)

    4) It also has a the product key which belongs to this computer and is on no other machine - as far as I know.

     

    I would have reinstalled Windows Home Edition a long time ago, but I have no way of doing so as they don't give you the actual Windows CD at PC World, just reformatting discs (It might be on there somewhere, but I can't see how to access it).  I can't take the computer back , the UK, as I live in Spain now.

     

    I appreciate your help.

     

     

    Friday, May 18, 2007 7:42 AM
  • Cencerrita,

     

    The reason your computer guy used a "handy" copy of XP because in your situation with a replaced motherboard, quite often the recovery/reinstallation CDs or recovery partition supplied by the manufacturer will not work because the CD or partition is looking for special data in the BIOS.  Such data will be there on a factory motherboard but won't be there on a generic replacement motherboard.

     

    To get genuine, you have to borrow from someone what is called a systembuilder/OEM CD for XP Home Edition.  This is a genuine MS hologram CD that does NOT have the name of any computer manufacturer on it.  It has "for use with a new PC" printed in the hologram.  If you do a clean installation with that CD using the Product Key that's on your CoA, you will be able to complete installation.  Finally, you will have to do a telephonic activation to activate.  Since a clean installation destroys all data on the hard disk, be sure to back up any valuable email, pix, docs, music, etc etc that you annot afford to lose.

     

    I wrote this detailed response to another poster a few weeks ago, but it applies to you, too:

     

    "There are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter, retail (aka full packaged product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer).

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is not permitted to be moved to any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

    There is one exception, the case of a defective motherboard.  If a motheboard becomes defective, you are of course permitted to change it and reinstall your OEM XP license to it.  For reasons stated below, if at all possible, you should replace it with and identical board or the manufacturer's designated replacement.

    The details become sticky when the license was obtained thru a major manufacturer that uses SLP technology, which sets the recovery or repair CD to look for certain bits in the BIOS of the official manufacturer's motherboards.  If such bits are not found, as they would not be if you replaced the defective board with one not from the original computer manufacturer, then the CD will refuse to install XP.  The correct thing to do in these cases is to install XP using a genuine systembuilder/OEM MS XP CDROM, which does not have the SLP technology.  However, when installing, be sure to use the Product Key on the Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the computer, and NOT the Product Key that came with the CD. (Note that retail and Volume License CDs will NOT accept OEM product keys, returning an "invalid product key" error.)  Finally, when installation is complete, do a Telephonic Activation because the OEM PK on the COA will not be accepted by the automated online activation system.  If the automated telephone system also refuses activation, choose the option to speak with an activation rep and explain that you are replacing a defective motherboard and annot use the manufacturer-supplied recovery CDs.

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availablity is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    Note that if the computer owner decides to replace the motherboard for performance reasons or to add features or new technology, the defective exception is NOT applicable and a new license for XP is required to be purchased."


    Friday, May 18, 2007 5:27 PM
  • Thanks!  Now all I need to do is find that elusive person in Spain that has an actual XP CD ... Not to mention having to attempt to save nearly 25 Gb of info onto CD's ... I must be the only person in the world without a DVD recorder... it'll sure focus what I need to keep and what can be dumped!
    Friday, May 18, 2007 6:20 PM
  • Cencerrita,

     

    Here is another alternative.  If the Certificate of Authenticity has "OEM Product" or "OEM Software" printed on the line right underneath the description of the product, say "Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition," then this is a system builder/OEM license (rather than an OEM SLP license from a major manufacturer OEM).  In such case, a lost CD can be replaced by asking your system builder to participate in the End User Media Replacement program, which is a customer service program from Microsoft that supplies replacement CDs to system builders for free so that they can supply them to their customers.

    If you don't have a system builder or they are no longer in business, you can request a replacement CD from Microsoft for $30 using this form:  http://download.microsoft.com/download/b/a/b/babc90a1-b794-4a94-84f5-cbc37827ddca/americas%20end%20user%20media%20replacement%20form.pdf

     

     

     

     

    Thank you
    Stephen Holm
    OGA Forum Manager

     

     

    Friday, May 18, 2007 8:02 PM
  • Thanks Stephen, this looks like the perfect solution (the CoA doesn't say OEM anything, just DSG Retail Ltd) ... but having looked at the form, I do have one or two problems ...
    •  I live in Spain and the form appears to only be for customers in the Americas (I am British but I now live in Spain)
    •  I live in the “Campo” (countryside) miles from anywhere, so I only have a Post Box address. Presumably I can give a friend’s address (but it won’t match the payment details)
    •  Faxing is a huge problem for me ... our internet is via satellite, we don’t have a land telephone line. Is it not possible to email the form?

    Just in case you think I am being awkward, here is the link to my website where we live ... you can see we are miles from anywhere! www.cencerrita.com

     

    I await your comments

    Saturday, May 19, 2007 10:28 AM
  • Cencerrita,

    Here is the form for Europe:

    http://download.microsoft.com/download/3/7/b/37b3b0ed-a2b2-4ee4-b2ad-a43eb8b11a26/emea%20end%20user%20media%20replacement%20form-final.doc

    There is no guarantee that Microsoft will honor your request for replacement media, since this specific replacement program is explicitly for those who purchased their computers from a systembuilder, a class of manufacturer that is typically a small business that builds relatively few computers.  Systembuilder CoAs have "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" printed on the CoA where yours has DGS Ltd printed on it.  The fact that is has DGS Ltd printed on it means that DGS Ltd is a larger computer manufacturer (what Microsoft calls a "royalty OEM") and is not a systembuilder per se for the purposes of Microsoft's definitions.

    However it certainly could not hurt to try.  Best of Luck!

    Monday, May 21, 2007 4:12 PM

All replies

  •  Cencerrita

     

    Thank you for posting your diagnostic information and posting on the thread. Diagnostic results help our team find resolutions. I have extracted a portion of your diagnostic results to review with you.

     

    WGA Data-->
    Validation Status: Blocked VLK

    WGA Version: Registered, 1.7.36.0
    Signed By: Microsoft

     

    I am sorry to hear about the problem your currently experiencing. I can see right away what the issue is with Windows XP operating system and why it is not passing validation.  Unfortunately, the product key used to install the operating system is a Volume License Key (VLK) that has been blocked per the request of the legal VLK holder.  As a rule, VL editions of either an Operating System and/or Office should not be sold to individual consumers. Businesses, schools and governments normally use VL editions for flexibility in installing many computers. Also, Volume Licenses for Windows XP and version of MS Office are Upgrade licenses ONLY and cannot be used as the original or base license for a new computer.

    This is why you were seeing the "Software Counterfeiting" messages on your computer, because the current installation of XP Pro is an unauthorized installation. In any case, please uninstall the non-genuine installation of the operating system to alleviate any complications which may arise from the non-genuine status of your system. As a customer there are options available to you for a resolution. First, if this comes as a total surprise, please go back to where you purchased the software and let them know it is a counterfeit copy and demand they immediately reimburse you and/or provide a Genuine Copy which was originally paid for. Print a copy of the diagnostic report so you may show them proof for the 114 Blocked VLK statuses. Second, if you purchased this copy of XP from a reseller or retailer, you are a victim and should report this piracy to Microsoft. Microsoft legal will follow up on all leads provided. Reporting piracy to Microsoft will help alleviate others in becoming victims such as yourself. You may be eligible for a complimentary replacement copy if you were sold a high quality counterfeit copy of Office.  For details on the ways to “Get Genuine”, see the web page that outlined your validation failure details or http://www.microsoft.com/genuine.  It will provide all of the possible steps which you can take.

    The key installed on this computer was not assigned by Microsoft. The key is counterfeit and was most likely generated by a non-sanctioned key generator. The product key found on your computer has been detected on multiple computers. Product keys are only allowed to be used on one computer unless otherwise specified in the end user licensing agreement.

     

    Counterfeiters have been known to sell computers with Windows installed, all using the same product key, to unsuspecting consumers. Again, you may be eligible for a complimentary replacement copy if you were sold a high quality counterfeit copy of Office. Please review and follow the guidance @ http://www.microsoft.com/genuine on how to become genuine.

     

    I am sorry to hear about your situation. Please don't hesitate re-posting if you need further assistance.


    Thank you
    Stephen Holm
    WGA Forum Manager

    Wednesday, May 16, 2007 9:26 PM
  • Cencerrita,

     

    Right now, your computer has a Volume Licensing edition of XP Pro installed (Line 8), and that installation was done with a now-blocked Volume Licensing Key (VLK) (Line 2).  VLKs are blocked by Microsoft at the request of the original keyholder for such reasons as the key was lost, stolen, compromised, misused, or expired.  Also, MS may have blocked the key if it notices a pattern of misuse, ie, more installations of XP using that key than authorized.

    As a rule, VL editions of XP should not be sold to individual consumers.  Businesses, schools and gov'ts normally use VL editions for flexibility in installing many computers.  Also, a Volume License for XP is an upgrade-only license and can never be used as the original or base license for XP on a computer.

    If you search the forum for the part of the VLK reported by the mgadiag utility, 4RHJG-83M4Y-7X9GW, you will see that over three dozen other posters have submitted reports with that same blocked VLK

    This is why you were seeing the "software counterfeiting" messages on your computer, because the current installation of XP is an unauthorized installation.

    Some Good News:  The installation of Office 2003 on the computer is showing as  Genuine!

    Next, look on the computer or with the materials you received with the computer, or with your Windows retail purchase, to see if you have a Certificate of Authenticty (COA).  If you have one, tell us about the COA.  Tell us:

    1.  What edition of Windows XP is it for, Home, Pro, or Media Center, or another version of Windows?

    2.  Does it read "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" in black lettering?

    3.  Or, does it have the computer manufacturer's name in black lettering?

    4.  DO NOT post the Product Key.

    Not sure what to look for?  See this page for reference:  http://www.microsoft.com/resources/howtotell/en/coa.mspx

    Thursday, May 17, 2007 8:39 PM
  • Thank you for you helpful reply:

    There is a COA stuck on the side, it is:

    1) Windows XP Home Edition

    2) No OEM

    3) DSG Retail Ltd (The computer was bought from PC World)

    4) It also has a the product key which belongs to this computer and is on no other machine - as far as I know.

     

    I would have reinstalled Windows Home Edition a long time ago, but I have no way of doing so as they don't give you the actual Windows CD at PC World, just reformatting discs (It might be on there somewhere, but I can't see how to access it).  I can't take the computer back , the UK, as I live in Spain now.

     

    I appreciate your help.

     

     

    Friday, May 18, 2007 7:42 AM
  • Cencerrita,

     

    The reason your computer guy used a "handy" copy of XP because in your situation with a replaced motherboard, quite often the recovery/reinstallation CDs or recovery partition supplied by the manufacturer will not work because the CD or partition is looking for special data in the BIOS.  Such data will be there on a factory motherboard but won't be there on a generic replacement motherboard.

     

    To get genuine, you have to borrow from someone what is called a systembuilder/OEM CD for XP Home Edition.  This is a genuine MS hologram CD that does NOT have the name of any computer manufacturer on it.  It has "for use with a new PC" printed in the hologram.  If you do a clean installation with that CD using the Product Key that's on your CoA, you will be able to complete installation.  Finally, you will have to do a telephonic activation to activate.  Since a clean installation destroys all data on the hard disk, be sure to back up any valuable email, pix, docs, music, etc etc that you annot afford to lose.

     

    I wrote this detailed response to another poster a few weeks ago, but it applies to you, too:

     

    "There are two types of licenses for XP that consumers will encounter, retail (aka full packaged product), and OEM (original equipment manufacturer).

    Retail licenses may be moved from one computer to another, as long as the license is activated on one computer at a time and as long as the previous installation of the license is removed from the previously licensed computer.

    OEM licenses for XP are tied to the first computer onto which they are installed and the license is not permitted to be moved to any other computer.  For the purposes of defining what a computer is, since a computer is really just a collection of parts, Microsoft has established that the motherboard is the base or "defining" component, and the OEM license is permanently tied to the motherboard.

    There is one exception, the case of a defective motherboard.  If a motheboard becomes defective, you are of course permitted to change it and reinstall your OEM XP license to it.  For reasons stated below, if at all possible, you should replace it with and identical board or the manufacturer's designated replacement.

    The details become sticky when the license was obtained thru a major manufacturer that uses SLP technology, which sets the recovery or repair CD to look for certain bits in the BIOS of the official manufacturer's motherboards.  If such bits are not found, as they would not be if you replaced the defective board with one not from the original computer manufacturer, then the CD will refuse to install XP.  The correct thing to do in these cases is to install XP using a genuine systembuilder/OEM MS XP CDROM, which does not have the SLP technology.  However, when installing, be sure to use the Product Key on the Certificate of Authenticity affixed to the computer, and NOT the Product Key that came with the CD. (Note that retail and Volume License CDs will NOT accept OEM product keys, returning an "invalid product key" error.)  Finally, when installation is complete, do a Telephonic Activation because the OEM PK on the COA will not be accepted by the automated online activation system.  If the automated telephone system also refuses activation, choose the option to speak with an activation rep and explain that you are replacing a defective motherboard and annot use the manufacturer-supplied recovery CDs.

    One does not "lose their license" for XP if the motherboard becomes defective and has to be replaced.  If the computer owner chooses to use, or because of availablity is forced to use, a board that is not a direct or identical replacement, there has to be a mechanism to accommodate these circumstances, and that is why a telephonic activation is authorized.

    Note that if the computer owner decides to replace the motherboard for performance reasons or to add features or new technology, the defective exception is NOT applicable and a new license for XP is required to be purchased."


    Friday, May 18, 2007 5:27 PM
  • Thanks!  Now all I need to do is find that elusive person in Spain that has an actual XP CD ... Not to mention having to attempt to save nearly 25 Gb of info onto CD's ... I must be the only person in the world without a DVD recorder... it'll sure focus what I need to keep and what can be dumped!
    Friday, May 18, 2007 6:20 PM
  • Cencerrita,

     

    Here is another alternative.  If the Certificate of Authenticity has "OEM Product" or "OEM Software" printed on the line right underneath the description of the product, say "Microsoft Windows XP Home Edition," then this is a system builder/OEM license (rather than an OEM SLP license from a major manufacturer OEM).  In such case, a lost CD can be replaced by asking your system builder to participate in the End User Media Replacement program, which is a customer service program from Microsoft that supplies replacement CDs to system builders for free so that they can supply them to their customers.

    If you don't have a system builder or they are no longer in business, you can request a replacement CD from Microsoft for $30 using this form:  http://download.microsoft.com/download/b/a/b/babc90a1-b794-4a94-84f5-cbc37827ddca/americas%20end%20user%20media%20replacement%20form.pdf

     

     

     

     

    Thank you
    Stephen Holm
    OGA Forum Manager

     

     

    Friday, May 18, 2007 8:02 PM
  • Thanks Stephen, this looks like the perfect solution (the CoA doesn't say OEM anything, just DSG Retail Ltd) ... but having looked at the form, I do have one or two problems ...
    •  I live in Spain and the form appears to only be for customers in the Americas (I am British but I now live in Spain)
    •  I live in the “Campo” (countryside) miles from anywhere, so I only have a Post Box address. Presumably I can give a friend’s address (but it won’t match the payment details)
    •  Faxing is a huge problem for me ... our internet is via satellite, we don’t have a land telephone line. Is it not possible to email the form?

    Just in case you think I am being awkward, here is the link to my website where we live ... you can see we are miles from anywhere! www.cencerrita.com

     

    I await your comments

    Saturday, May 19, 2007 10:28 AM
  • Cencerrita,

    Here is the form for Europe:

    http://download.microsoft.com/download/3/7/b/37b3b0ed-a2b2-4ee4-b2ad-a43eb8b11a26/emea%20end%20user%20media%20replacement%20form-final.doc

    There is no guarantee that Microsoft will honor your request for replacement media, since this specific replacement program is explicitly for those who purchased their computers from a systembuilder, a class of manufacturer that is typically a small business that builds relatively few computers.  Systembuilder CoAs have "OEM Software" or "OEM Product" printed on the CoA where yours has DGS Ltd printed on it.  The fact that is has DGS Ltd printed on it means that DGS Ltd is a larger computer manufacturer (what Microsoft calls a "royalty OEM") and is not a systembuilder per se for the purposes of Microsoft's definitions.

    However it certainly could not hurt to try.  Best of Luck!

    Monday, May 21, 2007 4:12 PM