locked
Legitimate? Using standard OEM Media to reinstall Windows on a ASUS OEM Laptop RRS feed

  • Question

  • My problem is that I have a customer's ASUS laptop whose hard drive failed.  We replaced the hard drive, but the customer did not have recovery CDs for the laptop.  We called ASUS and ordered recovery CDs.  However, the discs they sent did not work with his computer.  We got a second set of discs from ASUS which worked, but a week later the customer brought the computer back to us because things were not working right and his system had Windows 7 Ultimate on it, but was originally loaded with Windows 7 Home Premium (the key on the computer is for Windows 7 HP).  So we have no way of curing his de-activated Windows since there is a product mismatch.  We are going to try and get correct CDs from ASUS one more time, but in the event that they fail to provide proper discs I had another solution.

    In the past, I have used standard non-branded OEM CDs.  By unbranded, I mean not from HP, Dell, Toshiba, etc.  Just OEM CDs that we use when building new PCs.  I have succesfully used these non-branded OEM CDs to reinstall Windows on MFG PCs using the product key on the bottom/side of the PC.  This has worked for most PCs, except for Dells (and maybe some others) which require Dell specific OEM CDs in order to accept the product key.  So I am not wanting to know whether it will work, or how to make it work.  

    My question is simply: is this legal or legitimate to do.  I know you are supposed to use the original recovery CDs, but ASUS is not providing the correct media.  I do not see a problem with this if Windows activates properly with HIS product key on his PC. 

    Also, to be clear, we will not be providing him with a copy of the disc.  I do know that distributing OEM CDs without a key is not legal, so he will have to work with ASUS in the future if he ever needs those recovery CDs again or bring it back to us.

    Thanks in advance to anyone who can answer this simply and plainly.

    Saturday, March 3, 2012 7:13 PM

Answers

  • Yes, you can use a generic Windows 7 OEM disc with the OEM Windows 7 product key that is affixed to the computer.  However, product activation via the internet will fail and telephone activation will be necessary (a five minute procedure).

    Carey Frisch

    Saturday, March 3, 2012 7:31 PM
    Moderator
  • The legitimacy is in the product key, not the disk.  How you reinstall does not matter but owning the COA product key does.  It is fine.

    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Saturday, March 3, 2012 8:28 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • Yes, you can use a generic Windows 7 OEM disc with the OEM Windows 7 product key that is affixed to the computer.  However, product activation via the internet will fail and telephone activation will be necessary (a five minute procedure).

    Carey Frisch

    Saturday, March 3, 2012 7:31 PM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for your input Carey.  So this does not violate any Microsoft licensing terms or anything and is completely legitimate to do?  That is my only concern is that Microsoft could come back on us that procedures were not followed correctly or something.  Also, are you able to speak on behalf of Microsoft, or just speaking from experience?

    I really don't mean to sound rude, but Microsoft is a big organization and I want to make sure I don't make them mad ;)

    Saturday, March 3, 2012 7:36 PM
  • The legitimacy is in the product key, not the disk.  How you reinstall does not matter but owning the COA product key does.  It is fine.

    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Saturday, March 3, 2012 8:28 PM
    Answerer
  • The only issue is you can no longer approach the manufacturer of the laptop (ASUS) for Windows 7 support issues - you would be entirely responsible.

    Carey Frisch

    Sunday, March 4, 2012 2:36 AM
    Moderator
  • I really don't mean to sound rude, but Microsoft is a big organization and I want to make sure I don't make them mad ;)

    I concur with both Carey and Colin on this.

    Using an OEM key in generic OEM or Non-OEM (i.e. retail) software is acceptable and is within the Microsoft Licensing terms.  As for continued support through the OEM (Asus), I do not know, but Carey is likely correct.

    Thank you,


    Darin MS




    Monday, March 5, 2012 8:50 PM
  • If the product key is the one Asus affixed to the computer then the edition is right and I don't see why Asus would not support it from the standpoint of software.  However age or modifications to the computer might put it out of warranty.

    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.

    Monday, March 5, 2012 9:04 PM
    Answerer