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Windows 7 Ultimate Edition I Purchased on Ebay is non-genuine RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've been a faithful user of Microsoft products since MS-DOS 6.22 and Windows 3.11.  I purchased a new, unopened box with Windows 7 Ultimate Edition on Ebay from a gentleman who claimed he got it from participating in a beta trial.  I installed and activated it, and it ran on my machine for three months, until one day when my computer booted and I got the error message that my copy of Windows was not genuine.  I tried to reactivate it, and finally called Microsoft to find out what the problem was.  Microsoft informed me that the software key I had was for an MSDN subscriber copy of Windows 7, and they had deactivated the key because I'm not an MSDN subscriber.  I utilized the "Get Genuine" link in the activation window, and paid ANOTHER $199.00 to Microsoft to reactivate Windows with a new key.  When I contacted Ebay and told them what happened, and that the gentleman who sold me the software apparently sold it to me in violation of the software agreement, they informed me that it was just too bad.  I had 45 days to report the problem and since Microsoft didn't deactivate the key until three months after I bought it, I missed the deadline to report. 

    Mr. Gates, you've made your $60 Billion off of loyal users like me, but you have now made your last dime from me.  I will NEVER purchase another Microsoft product, and I will encourage everyone else I know to do likewise.  You can take your $60 billion and go straight to hell with it...oh...YOU CAN'T TAKE IT WITH YOU, CAN YOU?   GOOD!!

    Kevin Stephenson


    Kevin Stephenson
    Monday, March 7, 2011 3:54 AM

Answers

  • What has MS to do with the scam?  There are no legitimate deeply discounted copies of Windows 7 out there.  I realize that now.  Like you, I let my judgment get clouded by the hope of saving substantial money.  But I'm not blaming Microsoft. 

    You misunderstand the MSDN situation.  The crooks are doing things like using stolen credit card data to buy MSDN subscriptions and keygen software to generate thousands of keys.  The reason the crooks use MSDN keys is the multiple activation feature.  Clever use delays detection long enough for the crooks to harvest a lot of sales and then vanish.  These are not keys abused by legitimate subscribers.  Policing the legitimate subscribers simply would not address the issue.

    The counterfeiters are producing tens of thousands of these retail boxes in China and Mexico.  See:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzqNNiOM0cs


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Monday, March 7, 2011 4:58 AM
    Answerer

All replies

  • It wasn't invalidated because the seller kept within the limit provided for by the MSDN license, which as you know allows ten activations.  The number of activations needed to raise a flag at MS is known only to them, but the seller avoided detection by not pushing his luck.  Once MS detects a license abuse it investigates before blocking the key.  Unfortunately this all takes time.  This scam (which I fell for also and I have been using MS products even longer than you) is carefully constructed to avoid detection for as long as possible.  It's very frustrating.

    The counterfeiting is not Microsoft's doing.  Blame the crook.  Obviously MS has to protect its interests as do you.

    We all appreciate the fact that you are venting, but be aware that this is not Microsoft.  You need to lodge your complaint with them.


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Monday, March 7, 2011 4:16 AM
    Answerer
  • Colin--

      What infuriates me is that Microsoft is reaching its tentacles out into the software world at large and trying to police the entire planet, and in the process they're victimizing innocent people.  Have you ever heard of the term "bona fide purchaser for value"?  It's a legal term that means, in essence, that a purchaser who buys something for value, and does not know that there is anything wrong with the chain of title, actually owns the item.  I realize that what I bought was a license, but I had no way of knowing that the seller was selling it illegally, and Microsoft let me use it under the mistaken notion that it was genuine for three months until they disabled the key, which made it too late for me to do anything about it.  If Microsoft wants to do something about software piracy, they need to go after the MSDN subscribers who are fraudulently selling the software (if that's who did it), and not after the innocent purchaser.  This type of thing does absolutely NOTHING for Microsoft's reputation, but reinforce the "satanic big brother" image that propelled Linux into the mainstream.  My brother has been ranting about Microsoft for years, and I was always defending them and their products...UNTIL NOW.


    Kevin Stephenson
    Monday, March 7, 2011 4:44 AM
  • By the way...have you ever tried to get through to a live body at Microsoft who doesn't have an Indian accent??
    Kevin Stephenson
    Monday, March 7, 2011 4:48 AM
  • What has MS to do with the scam?  There are no legitimate deeply discounted copies of Windows 7 out there.  I realize that now.  Like you, I let my judgment get clouded by the hope of saving substantial money.  But I'm not blaming Microsoft. 

    You misunderstand the MSDN situation.  The crooks are doing things like using stolen credit card data to buy MSDN subscriptions and keygen software to generate thousands of keys.  The reason the crooks use MSDN keys is the multiple activation feature.  Clever use delays detection long enough for the crooks to harvest a lot of sales and then vanish.  These are not keys abused by legitimate subscribers.  Policing the legitimate subscribers simply would not address the issue.

    The counterfeiters are producing tens of thousands of these retail boxes in China and Mexico.  See:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzqNNiOM0cs


    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Monday, March 7, 2011 4:58 AM
    Answerer
  • Colin--

      I appreciate your guiding me to the YouTube site where this is discussed.  I had no idea that this scam was so widespread, or that this is the way they were doing it.   Is "keygen" software a hacker tool or part of an MSDN subscription?

     

    Kevin Stephenson


    Kevin Stephenson
    Monday, March 7, 2011 5:11 AM
  • Hacker all the way.  Whenever you see a user offering to provide a replacement key in a forum you know he has keygen software.  I don't know how the software works but you can see it discussed in various pirate websites like Pirates Bay and such.  I leave you to do your own googling on the subject for obvious reasons.
    Colin Barnhorst Windows 7 Ultimate x64 on DIY with 6GB ram.
    Monday, March 7, 2011 5:16 AM
    Answerer
  •   In the old days (right before the internet became big) Microsoft developed a key called a Volume License Key (VLK) It was intended for very large companies that had hundreds to thousands of PC that needed Windows installed on. It was a major hassle for companies to manage thousands of Product keys and trying to Activate each install would have taken a significant number of man-hours.

      A VLK key was created so these companies would only need one key and that key would also by-passed the need for activation.  This was great for these companies and the risk of the key leaking was low since there was no way to mass distribute the leaked key...

      Then the Internet hit. A leaked key could hit the whole world in just a few key stokes. In addition, it was found that if you made a program that could create fake VLK keys that mimiced true VLK keys, you didn't even need a leaked key...you could just make your own.Thus, KeyGen (or Key Generator) programs were born.

      During the Windows Vista/Windows 7 time period, we discontinued these types of VLK keys (that by-pass activation) so now days you don't see keygens except for XP and some out-dated versions of Office.

      Now, since we plugged up that avenue for Pirating (by discontinuing the No-Activation VLK) Pirates started looking for another way to do their thing.   Unfortunately they figured out a way to game the MSDN Subscription system.  I foresee that we will come up with a way to plug this avenue of Piracy, as well, but in the mean time, we are investigating suspected MSDN keys as quickly as possible.

     

    Thank you,


    Darin MS
    Tuesday, March 8, 2011 7:56 PM