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can we have the option to use Windows Live Skydrive for backup or online photo backup RRS feed

  • Question

  • Can we have the option to use Windows Live Skydrive for backup or online photo backup? what is the cons on doing this? Anyone know the statistic on how many people is actually paying for the online backup features okay user can get a external harddrive to store photos and it's way faster.
    Monday, March 24, 2008 10:30 PM

Answers

  • You can use Skydrive or any medium or method to backup your files. Just turn One Care Backup off.The advantage to One Care online photo backup is that you don't have to remember to run a backup. I don't know how well One Care online photo backup will be received but of all the critical data on a computer, digital photos and e-mail are the most common irreplaceable data.

     

    Monday, March 24, 2008 11:19 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • You can use Skydrive or any medium or method to backup your files. Just turn One Care Backup off.The advantage to One Care online photo backup is that you don't have to remember to run a backup. I don't know how well One Care online photo backup will be received but of all the critical data on a computer, digital photos and e-mail are the most common irreplaceable data.

     

    Monday, March 24, 2008 11:19 PM
    Moderator
  • The other valuable feature of any online backup solution is that it is stored remotely, usually far away from the PC being backed up, which is usually difficult for the average person to do themselves. This way if a disaster occurs such as a fire or even something like the flooding of New Orleans, your pictures are stored safely somewhere else, likely with their own backups in case the remote system fails.

     

    This kind of remote backup has traditionally cost businesses thousands of dollars and as you've clearly shown, few individuals understand how likely it is that such a loss can occur to them personally. Ever noticed how the first things out of someones mouth after a disaster is, "glad we're all OK", followed by "never thought it could happen to us" and then "it's the personal items like photos we really care about, everything else is replaceable."

     

    Funny thing is, no matter how many times they hear it, most just don't really get it until it happens to them. When your entire home is destroyed you don't have the chance to get these things back. That's why with the new ability to save picures as data they are both easy to destroy, but just as easy to save remotely. OneCare is just making this a more obvious choice which will gain popularity as more people experience this type of loss due to disaster or simply a personal error when deleting files.

     

    OneCareBear

    Tuesday, March 25, 2008 5:29 AM
    Moderator
  • The problem is that 2 gigabyes is woefully inadequate for even pictures.  As those with digital cameras know, it's very easy to take gigabytes of pictures in a years' time.  We've been doing digital for a decade, now... and we have well over 10 gigabytes of photographs.

     

    Symantec's 360 product allows you to back up anything to online storage and purchase extra space when you need it.

     

    Microsoft needs to get on that bandwagon.

    Tuesday, March 25, 2008 2:11 PM
  • I thought this number sounded small too, so I went to Instant Help and found this:

     

    "With your OneCare online photo backup subscription, you receive 10 gigabytes (GB) of online storage space to use to back up your photos."

     

    It does appear that this is the maximum storage at this point though, so your request for the ability to add space still makes sense, though I'd guess the current 10 GB would be enough for most home users at present.

     

    OneCareBear

     

    < EDIT > One additional note. I've noticed that many of the pictures taken by home photographers really aren't worth keeping. They are either horribly dark, blurry or simply not of any value and only taken because there's no cost involved as there was with film and prints. It's probably of value for many to look closely at what they are keeping and determine if they're simply holding on to it because they took it or because it really has personal value as a memory.

     

    In your case I suspect you've already learned this, but I helped my sister who is new to digital photography make these decsions about hundreds of photos she'd taken with her new digital camera and we easily pared them down to about half the original number with no loss of really important memories. Eventually her choices of what to shoot will get better, but with digital they really don't have to, just throw them away later.

    Tuesday, March 25, 2008 2:46 PM
    Moderator
  • Great
    The Future Belongs Who Believes In Their Dreams.
    Monday, March 29, 2010 9:46 PM