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Which flavor of XP-Pro? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Had a customer bring in a laptop with a virus. Booting up showed it was running XP-Professional w/SP3, but the bottom sticker had a product key for Windows XP-Home. I used a product key finder and got the XP-Pro key and attempted to reinstall XP-Pro using a 'retail' disc and got 'Key invalid'. Tried to reinstall again using an XP-Pro 'upgrade' disc and still got a 'Key invalid'. Even tried to install using a Technet disc, guess what - same result.

    Each one of these tries took time to get to the place to enter the product key and tell me that it failed on reinstallation. There should be a way to tell if a key is valid (I assumed that the system was activated and working with the XP-Pro before it got infected) and what type of disc is needed to reinstall; OEM, Retail Upgrade, Retail Full, Technet, MSDN, VL, etc.

    What I ended up doing (and probably not pleasing the customer!), was to reinstall the OEM XP-Home using the product key from the sticker on the laptop. Got rid of the virus infection and had a 'new' reinstall of XP-Home. I guess the customer can reinstall the XP-Pro the way it was before, using their disc.

    Monday, January 30, 2012 10:44 PM

Answers

  • "gbscs" wrote in message news:d0d712b0-24be-45a6-bb0d-ae69f1c15ef0...

    Had a customer bring in a laptop with a virus. Booting up showed it was running XP-Professional w/SP3, but the bottom sticker had a product key for Windows XP-Home. I used a product key finder and got the XP-Pro key and attempted to reinstall XP-Pro using a 'retail' disc and got 'Key invalid'. Tried to reinstall again using an XP-Pro 'upgrade' disc and still got a 'Key invalid'. Even tried to install using a Technet disc, guess what - same result.

    Each one of these tries took time to get to the place to enter the product key and tell me that it failed on reinstallation. There should be a way to tell if a key is valid (I assumed that the system was activated and working with the XP-Pro before it got infected) and what type of disc is needed to reinstall; OEM, Retail Upgrade, Retail Full, Technet, MSDN, VL, etc.

    What I ended up doing (and probably not pleasing the customer!), was to reinstall the OEM XP-Home using the product key from the sticker on the laptop. Got rid of the virus infection and had a 'new' reinstall of XP-Home. I guess the customer can reinstall the XP-Pro the way it was before, using their disc.

    Chance are that the install was a Volume License – and counterfeit. They probably already had to reinstall once because of viral attacks, and used one of the many torrents available
     
    You should always use the Home OEM COA Key to reinstall the machine, using an OEM Home disk if it’s the only one you have proof of license for.
     
    I hope you installed an AV for them? <g>
     
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, January 31, 2012 4:56 PM
    Monday, January 30, 2012 11:02 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • "gbscs" wrote in message news:d0d712b0-24be-45a6-bb0d-ae69f1c15ef0...

    Had a customer bring in a laptop with a virus. Booting up showed it was running XP-Professional w/SP3, but the bottom sticker had a product key for Windows XP-Home. I used a product key finder and got the XP-Pro key and attempted to reinstall XP-Pro using a 'retail' disc and got 'Key invalid'. Tried to reinstall again using an XP-Pro 'upgrade' disc and still got a 'Key invalid'. Even tried to install using a Technet disc, guess what - same result.

    Each one of these tries took time to get to the place to enter the product key and tell me that it failed on reinstallation. There should be a way to tell if a key is valid (I assumed that the system was activated and working with the XP-Pro before it got infected) and what type of disc is needed to reinstall; OEM, Retail Upgrade, Retail Full, Technet, MSDN, VL, etc.

    What I ended up doing (and probably not pleasing the customer!), was to reinstall the OEM XP-Home using the product key from the sticker on the laptop. Got rid of the virus infection and had a 'new' reinstall of XP-Home. I guess the customer can reinstall the XP-Pro the way it was before, using their disc.

    Chance are that the install was a Volume License – and counterfeit. They probably already had to reinstall once because of viral attacks, and used one of the many torrents available
     
    You should always use the Home OEM COA Key to reinstall the machine, using an OEM Home disk if it’s the only one you have proof of license for.
     
    I hope you installed an AV for them? <g>
     
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Darin Smith MS Tuesday, January 31, 2012 4:56 PM
    Monday, January 30, 2012 11:02 PM
    Moderator
  • Chance are that the install was a Volume License – and counterfeit. They probably already had to reinstall once because of viral attacks, and used one of the many torrents available
     
    You should always use the Home OEM COA Key to reinstall the machine, using an OEM Home disk if it’s the only one you have proof of license for.
     
    I hope you installed an AV for them? <g>
     
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth


    Thanks! Yes, since I didn't have proof of a legal XP-Pro on that system, I reinstalled the OEM XP-Home and installed Microsoft Security Essentials.

    But, it would be nice to determine if an OS is valid/legal and which type of disc to use to reload it, if it is legal.


    GwB
    Monday, January 30, 2012 11:15 PM
  • "gbscs" wrote in message news:b742147e-9fb2-462f-8599-0fdffef34d4c...
    Chance are that the install was a Volume License – and counterfeit. They probably already had to reinstall once because of viral attacks, and used one of the many torrents available
     
    You should always use the Home OEM COA Key to reinstall the machine, using an OEM Home disk if it’s the only one you have proof of license for.
     
    I hope you installed an AV for them? <g>
     
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth


    Thanks! Yes, since I didn't have proof of a legal XP-Pro on that system, I reinstalled the OEM XP-Home and installed Microsoft Security Essentials.

    But, it would be nice to determine if an OS is valid/legal and which type of disc to use to reload it, if it is legal.


    GwB
     
     
    Use the MGADiag tool – it will tell you most of that (assuming you can get the machine to boot in either normal or safe mode – one day I must see what happens in Safe Mode with Command Prompt!)
     
    MGADiag tool (download and save to desktop - http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 )
    Once saved, run the tool.
    Click on the Continue button, which will produce the report.
    To copy the report to Notepad, click on the Copy button in the tool (ignore any error messages at this point), and then paste (using either r-click/Paste, or Ctrl+V ) a Notepad window.
    Notepad output is a little more meaningful than what’s on-screen, the saved files can generally be ignored.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, January 30, 2012 11:41 PM
    Moderator
  •  
    Use the MGADiag tool – it will tell you most of that (assuming you can get the machine to boot in either normal or safe mode – one day I must see what happens in Safe Mode with Command Prompt!)
     
    MGADiag tool (download and save to desktop - http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 )
    Once saved, run the tool.
    Click on the Continue button, which will produce the report.
    To copy the report to Notepad, click on the Copy button in the tool (ignore any error messages at this point), and then paste (using either r-click/Paste, or Ctrl+V ) a Notepad window.
    Notepad output is a little more meaningful than what’s on-screen, the saved files can generally be ignored.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Sadly, I already returned that laptop to its owner so I can't try the MGADiag tool on that one. I will try that next time...
    GwB
    Monday, January 30, 2012 11:50 PM
  • "gbscs" wrote in message news:46fbd230-910a-443e-bf00-bbfef4f02ebd...
     
    Use the MGADiag tool – it will tell you most of that (assuming you can get the machine to boot in either normal or safe mode – one day I must see what happens in Safe Mode with Command Prompt!)
     
    MGADiag tool (download and save to desktop - http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 )
    Once saved, run the tool.
    Click on the Continue button, which will produce the report.
    To copy the report to Notepad, click on the Copy button in the tool (ignore any error messages at this point), and then paste (using either r-click/Paste, or Ctrl+V ) a Notepad window.
    Notepad output is a little more meaningful than what’s on-screen, the saved files can generally be ignored.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth

    Sadly, I already returned that laptop to its owner so I can't try the MGADiag tool on that one. I will try that next time...
    GwB
     
     
    Have a read of a few of the posts in these WGA forums for an idea of what can be told from them – if you need specifics, post the notepad report, and someone will usually respond well within 24hours. Darin is Mon-Fri US (Redmond) time, and I am here most days at some point (UK time) – one or two other people pop in from time to time, to fill any gaps (and correct any errors I make!)
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Monday, January 30, 2012 11:59 PM
    Moderator