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What exactly does it means in 70-483 tyhe following 2 Skills being measured? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Looking through the skills being measured for the Exam 70-483 I came across the following two requirements which makes no sense?

    1. Create and Use Types -> create and implement classes based on the (...) IUnknown interfaces

    2. Debug Applications and Implement Security   -> Implement the System.Security namespace

    1. There is no such Interface in .NET

    2. How does one goes on and implement a namespace?

    TIA,

    Tibi


    MCT, MCDBA, MCSD.NET, MCPD (*.*)

    Friday, October 12, 2012 1:26 PM

Answers

  • As some .Net applications still reference COM objects, I guess they expect us to know about using IUnknown.

    The best example of using System.Security is for implementing Code Access Permissions http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/h846e9b3.aspx

    Code access permissions are permission objects that are used to help protect resources and operations from unauthorized use. They are a fundamental part of the common language runtime's mechanism for enforcing security restrictions on managed code.

    Each code access permission represents one of the following rights: 

    • The right to access a protected resource, such as files or environment variables.

    • The right to perform a protected operation, such as accessing unmanaged code.

    All code access permissions can be requested or demanded by code, and the runtime decides which permissions, if any, to grant the code.

    Each code access permission derives from the CodeAccessPermission class, which means that all code access permissions have methods in common, such as Demand, Assert, Deny, PermitOnly, IsSubsetOf, Intersect, and Union.


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    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Wednesday, October 17, 2012 12:59 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Tibi,

    With regards to the IUnkown interface and the System.Security namespace, here are a couple of helpful links.

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms680509(v=vs.85).aspx

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.security.aspx

    Please let me know if this helps.

    mjc


    Please do not forget to click “Vote as Helpful” if any post helps you and "Mark as Answer”if it solves the issue.

    • Proposed as answer by Mr. WhartyModerator Wednesday, October 17, 2012 1:00 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Tibor19MVP Thursday, October 18, 2012 7:51 PM
    Friday, October 12, 2012 6:43 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Mike,

    Those are the first hits google gives you when you search for my question. Unfortunately they are not the answers I was looking for.

    1. IUnknown is related to COM and has not so much to do with .NET. I am not aware of such an interface in C# and even if it was one it is an obscure one that most of the C# developers nver heard, or will ever hear of it.

    2. I know where system.security is, what I don't understand is what it is required. How do you implement the System.Security namespace? What exactly is required?

    The reason I am asking is because soon I will start training people for those certifications, and unfortunatelly, I won't be able to cover 100% of the requirements, as some of them are pretty confusing.

    /Tibi


    MCT, MCDBA, MCSD.NET, MCPD (*.*)

    Monday, October 15, 2012 6:01 PM
  • As some .Net applications still reference COM objects, I guess they expect us to know about using IUnknown.

    The best example of using System.Security is for implementing Code Access Permissions http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/h846e9b3.aspx

    Code access permissions are permission objects that are used to help protect resources and operations from unauthorized use. They are a fundamental part of the common language runtime's mechanism for enforcing security restrictions on managed code.

    Each code access permission represents one of the following rights: 

    • The right to access a protected resource, such as files or environment variables.

    • The right to perform a protected operation, such as accessing unmanaged code.

    All code access permissions can be requested or demanded by code, and the runtime decides which permissions, if any, to grant the code.

    Each code access permission derives from the CodeAccessPermission class, which means that all code access permissions have methods in common, such as Demand, Assert, Deny, PermitOnly, IsSubsetOf, Intersect, and Union.


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    Wednesday, October 17, 2012 12:59 AM
    Moderator
  • For me both those points are flukes! Think about it, on one hand we have requirements like “program decisions by using switch statements, if/then, and operators”, and on the other hand they talk about “implement the System.Security namespace”. CAS was actually changed a lot for various resons, but I would rather put CAS in the requirements, to make it clear than using a stupid statement like implementing a namespace.  Again it is confusing. Just because comes from Microsoft doesn’t make it right.

    Same goes for IUnknown. It is a very obscure interface, that you only need it if you work in native C++ with COM. No relation to C# whatsoever. If anyone has any link to a C# program using IUnknonw, in an application that a junior programmer will understand, or even will write, I would like to see it!

    /Tibi


    MCT, MCDBA, MCSD.NET, MCPD (*.*)

    Thursday, October 18, 2012 7:48 PM
  • Hi Tibi,

    Do you still need an answer for your question since October 2012?


    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    MCSE:Server Infrastructure, MCSE:Desktop Infrastructure, MCSA Server 2012, Citrix CCIA & CCEE, Cisco CCNA, VMware VCP 3/4/5 Blog: http://www.citrix-guru.com and http://www.rds-support.eu Twitter: @dnyvandam


    Tuesday, April 9, 2013 12:49 PM
    Moderator