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WHS Restore can't find my new SATA drive RRS feed

  • Question

  • I got WHS up and running about a week ago, and I am thrilled to be able to regular nightly backups across my home PCs.  Works like a charm.

    One of my PCs are currently running Vista Premium on a 320 GB SATA Seagate HD.  The MB is a Gigabyte GA-MA78GM-S2H (AMD 64X2).  I wanted to upgrade this HD to a WD 640 GB SATA HD, and ran across in article that mentioned how easy it was to use WHS to do this.

    I created a manual backup, unplugged the old HD, installed the new, and started Restore.  Ran into the connection problem,  but eventually figured out to get all the drivers off the backup on a USB, and with these network drives I was able to connect to my server.  Only problem - Can't see the new drive.  The drive is listed among the drives found, but when going to the screen managing the drives I only see my USB drive and the optical drive.

    When I do the same with the original drive (the 320 GB drive) it appears fine.  I have the following:
    - Put a partition on the 640 GB drive
    - Change the SATA channel used for the new drive
    - Get SATA drivers from Gigabyte/AMD
    - Boot with both drives in
    - Disable the regular IDE channels and have SATA
    - Add the drive to my Vista (including the portion), making a backup, and the store drivers from backup on USB

    I am NOT using RAID etc.  SATA is just set as IDE in the BIOS.  Don't understand why the 320 GB is recognized and not the 640 GB

    I can obviously upgrade to the new drive in other ways, but since I have 3 computers using the same MB, I certainly would like to be able to restore easily if I have a real HD failure.  Right now it appears a restore would be very painful...

    HELP!!!

    Henrik


     
    Wednesday, January 7, 2009 3:33 PM

Answers

  • Performed a backup, added the new drive, created two new (larger) partions on the new drive, and then restored using ClientRestoreWizard.  Shut PC down.  Unpluged old drive, and rebooted.

    Windows installed some drivers for a generic volume, rebooted, and I was set.  No repairs seems neccesary.

    Probably took a total of 20 minutes.

    Glad I know how to do this now.  Since I have extra computers and can replicate this process if I have a real HD failure. 

     I am still puzzled why the new drive was not recognized when using the Restore CD. 

    Thanks for you help

    Henrik

    • Marked as answer by HenrikDK2 Thursday, January 8, 2009 2:35 PM
    Wednesday, January 7, 2009 10:07 PM

All replies

  • As a practical matter, connect the drive to another computer joined to your server and use C:\Program files\Windows Home Server\ClientRestoreWizard.exe to restore to that drive.
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, January 7, 2009 4:24 PM
    Moderator
  • Ken,

    Thanks for the quick response.  I figured that is a way I could do it to get the data back, but would the drive be bootable after that?  Note that it is really a theoretical problem, as I can add the drive to the PC now, and copy everything over, and edit the boot info (I saw some info on that on another post).  My concern is to have an easy and FAST way to restore a computer if the HD crashes.


    Thanks,

    Henrik
    Wednesday, January 7, 2009 7:45 PM
  • It should be bootable; it was when I did it a few months ago. I'll admit I would try it before it was really important, however. :)
    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Wednesday, January 7, 2009 8:27 PM
    Moderator
  • Since you have already both drives in that computer and Vista still boots, you can also use the original OS to run ClientRestoreWizard.
    I also had a volume restores by this method booting successfully. If it doesn't, try Vistas Startup Repair wizard after booting from the Vista DVD.
    Best greetings from Germany
    Olaf
    Wednesday, January 7, 2009 9:24 PM
    Moderator
  • I'm in the middle of trying it right now.  Will post how it goes...

    Thanks for your help
    Wednesday, January 7, 2009 9:25 PM
  • Performed a backup, added the new drive, created two new (larger) partions on the new drive, and then restored using ClientRestoreWizard.  Shut PC down.  Unpluged old drive, and rebooted.

    Windows installed some drivers for a generic volume, rebooted, and I was set.  No repairs seems neccesary.

    Probably took a total of 20 minutes.

    Glad I know how to do this now.  Since I have extra computers and can replicate this process if I have a real HD failure. 

     I am still puzzled why the new drive was not recognized when using the Restore CD. 

    Thanks for you help

    Henrik

    • Marked as answer by HenrikDK2 Thursday, January 8, 2009 2:35 PM
    Wednesday, January 7, 2009 10:07 PM