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  • Question

  • On my system, I have several storage drives. The main drive is 350 gigs. WHS installed itself on that drive and it became the 'C' drive. DRIVE_C was partitioned by WHS to be 20 Gig. The data store was then started on DRIVE_D which was the other partition of the same drive.

    On any of the other drives, I can disable which moves the data off the drive so it can be replaced/upgraded/whatever. How can I do that for the partitioned drive? It has no option for migrating the data off. The drive is starting to show some SMART errors, so I want to replace it.

    How can I migrate all data off this partitioned drive? Or, should I just do a low-level disk copy/duplicate and replace the drive? Will that cause a problem with the store? I certainly don't want to lose any of my data.

    Thanks.
    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 12:55 PM

Answers

  • Assuming you have duplication turned on for all your shares, the supported replacement method for the Windows Home Server system drive is to remove the failing drive and replace it, then perform a server reinstallation. You'll find (somewhat sketchy) instructions for the reinstallation here. Some of the caveats:
    • When replacing the system drive and reinstalling, there is a "rebuild" phase in the installation path which can take a significant amount of time (hours to, in extreme cases, days).
    • You will need to recreate users, who will be reconnected to their personal folders in the Users share.
    • You will need to re-join clients to your server.
    • You will lose the add-ins you have installed. They'll be available for reinstallation after you've finished setting up your server again, but you may need to re-configure some or all of them, depending on how they store any information that should be persistent.
    • Customizations performed outside the Windows Home Server console won't be preserved, and will have to be re-implemented. So additional software installed will have to be reinstalled.
    • You may lose your backup database, if Windows Home Server has stored components on the system drive.
    • If you have not turned on duplication for all shares, you may lose files in your shares. This is a consequence of deciding not to protect those shares. In this case, since the drive hasn't failed yet, you could connect it to some other computer (you shouldn't connect an old Windows Home Server system drive to another installation) and copy the remaining (temporarily lost) files from it.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 5:10 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Assuming you have duplication turned on for all your shares, the supported replacement method for the Windows Home Server system drive is to remove the failing drive and replace it, then perform a server reinstallation. You'll find (somewhat sketchy) instructions for the reinstallation here. Some of the caveats:
    • When replacing the system drive and reinstalling, there is a "rebuild" phase in the installation path which can take a significant amount of time (hours to, in extreme cases, days).
    • You will need to recreate users, who will be reconnected to their personal folders in the Users share.
    • You will need to re-join clients to your server.
    • You will lose the add-ins you have installed. They'll be available for reinstallation after you've finished setting up your server again, but you may need to re-configure some or all of them, depending on how they store any information that should be persistent.
    • Customizations performed outside the Windows Home Server console won't be preserved, and will have to be re-implemented. So additional software installed will have to be reinstalled.
    • You may lose your backup database, if Windows Home Server has stored components on the system drive.
    • If you have not turned on duplication for all shares, you may lose files in your shares. This is a consequence of deciding not to protect those shares. In this case, since the drive hasn't failed yet, you could connect it to some other computer (you shouldn't connect an old Windows Home Server system drive to another installation) and copy the remaining (temporarily lost) files from it.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 5:10 PM
    Moderator
  • Do you think cloning the drive will be a headache? I suppose if it fails, I can always reinstall the original.

    Thanks, Ken!!

    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 5:34 PM
  • You have a failing drive. How trusting are you that you won't experience an error during the cloning process, one which corrupts important data?

    In addition, some users who have cloned their system drive have had serious problems with their server afterward, which resulted in a server reinstallation anyway.

    I'm not on the WHS team, I just post a lot. :)
    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 5:45 PM
    Moderator
  • That's what I'm looking for. Thanks.
    Tuesday, July 7, 2009 6:15 PM