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  • Question

  • I just install OneCare and I'm running the virus scan for the first time. I'm only running the Virus scan on the box and it is at 55% CPU and  almost 1G of memory. Does it always take up this much resources or i this just the first time. I'm running Vista Home Premium, on an AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core Processor 4000 with 3G of RAM.

     

    Friday, November 14, 2008 3:52 AM

Answers

  • I've moved your post to the AntiVirus topic folder. During a scan, it isn't unusual to see higher CPU and memory usage as a scan is an intensive process. 1 Gig seems excessing, but with 3 gigs or RAM, Windows is granting more memory to applications as needed. If OneCare didn't release this memory after the scan was complete, this could indicate that there is a problem.

    -steve

     

    Friday, November 14, 2008 2:18 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • I've moved your post to the AntiVirus topic folder. During a scan, it isn't unusual to see higher CPU and memory usage as a scan is an intensive process. 1 Gig seems excessing, but with 3 gigs or RAM, Windows is granting more memory to applications as needed. If OneCare didn't release this memory after the scan was complete, this could indicate that there is a problem.

    -steve

     

    Friday, November 14, 2008 2:18 PM
    Moderator
  • In addition to what Steve already mentioned, OneCare will use whatever resources are available to speed the process along. If you had little memory it would only use what was required, but since you have so much available, it will use much more in an attempt to finish faster, unless of course you start running something else.

     

    This is one of the myths of computing, that high memory or processor utilization is a "bad thing". In actuality, nothing is further from the truth. Unlike a car, a properly designed and operating computer can run for hours at 100% CPU and RAM utilization, though it may get warm and cooling fans may make more noise as a result. So if it actually has something to do, the more these items are utilized, the more you are getting out of the hardware.

     

    The fallacy (myth) comes about as a result of the many cheap computers that exist, since these can overheat and "crash", reboot or even be damaged by the excessive heat. This isn't the program's or even the operating system's fault, it's simply bad hardware design allowing critical components to overheat without either speeding up the fans or slowing down the processor (Intel Mobile M-Series processors do this, usually in laptops) to compensate.

     

    All antimalware programs create a high level of utilization while scanning, though in some cases they've chosen to throttle their operation to some reduced percentage to keep from having this issue with those PCs that aren't well designed. This is simply a concession though and there is otherwise absolutely no reason for it to be done.

     

    I have an old Intel PII 400MHz system with 512MB RAM that runs flat out at 100% for an hour or two every time either an anti-virus or anti-spyware scan is performed. It's been doing this faithfully since it was built in 1999 and has never had a single hardware failure of any sort. However, it was a high quality commercial business PC in its day, so it was built better than most cheap home PCs you get from the box stores.

     

    OneCareBear

    Saturday, November 15, 2008 5:17 AM
    Moderator