locked
In VS2010: VB=VB.NET, C# = C#.NET, VC++ = VC++.NET? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    A quick question is that in VS 2010, are all languages based on the .NET platform? For example, is VB actually VB.NET, C# actually C#.NET, C++ actually C++.NET, and so on?

    I am asking this question because I have seen in early versions VB labeled as VB.NET, but in VS 2010, no language has the suffix “.NET”
    with their name. So is it because after years of development and .NET has already become so widely accepted that using “.NET” to explicitly mark its distinction with traditional languages (with common intermediate language) is no longer necessary?

    Bob


    • Edited by Bob Sun Saturday, March 3, 2012 1:09 PM
    • Changed type Jie Bao Monday, March 5, 2012 5:21 AM
    • Moved by Jie Bao Monday, March 5, 2012 5:22 AM (From:Visual Studio Tools for Office)
    • Changed type Mr. Wharty Friday, June 1, 2012 1:26 PM
    Saturday, March 3, 2012 1:08 PM

Answers

  • The programming languages included in Visual Studio starting from version 2002 targeted the .NET Framework and had the ".NET" suffix in their names; nowadays this suffix is not specified anymore, even if the .NET Framework is the mainly targeted execution platform for software developed using Visual Studio.
    There is only an exception to this rule: Visual C++ is the only language that you can use to create the "old" Win32 applications (written using unmanaged code, instead of the managed code that is executed by the Common Language Runtime of the .NET Framework).

    Bye.


    Luigi Bruno - Microsoft Community Contributor 2011 Award

    • Marked as answer by Bob Sun Friday, June 1, 2012 6:02 PM
    Friday, June 1, 2012 3:50 PM
  • Yes, all languages in Visual Studio are based on the .Net framework.

    VB was the only language which had .Net appended to it's name. 

    The correct names for the languages are:

    • Visual C#
    • Visual Basic
    • Visual C++

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    • Marked as answer by Bob Sun Friday, June 1, 2012 6:02 PM
    Friday, June 1, 2012 1:26 PM

All replies

  • Yes, all languages in Visual Studio are based on the .Net framework.

    VB was the only language which had .Net appended to it's name. 

    The correct names for the languages are:

    • Visual C#
    • Visual Basic
    • Visual C++

    When you see answers and helpful posts, please click Vote As Helpful, Propose As Answer, and/or Mark As Answer

    Jeff Wharton
    MSysDev (C.Sturt), MDbDsgnMgt (C.Sturt), MCT, MCPD, MCSD, MCITP, MCDBA
    Blog: Mr. Wharty's Ramblings
    Twitter: @Mr_Wharty
    MC ID: Microsoft Transcript

    • Marked as answer by Bob Sun Friday, June 1, 2012 6:02 PM
    Friday, June 1, 2012 1:26 PM
  • The programming languages included in Visual Studio starting from version 2002 targeted the .NET Framework and had the ".NET" suffix in their names; nowadays this suffix is not specified anymore, even if the .NET Framework is the mainly targeted execution platform for software developed using Visual Studio.
    There is only an exception to this rule: Visual C++ is the only language that you can use to create the "old" Win32 applications (written using unmanaged code, instead of the managed code that is executed by the Common Language Runtime of the .NET Framework).

    Bye.


    Luigi Bruno - Microsoft Community Contributor 2011 Award

    • Marked as answer by Bob Sun Friday, June 1, 2012 6:02 PM
    Friday, June 1, 2012 3:50 PM
  • Mr. Wharty and Luigi,

    I got it, thanks very much.

    Friday, June 1, 2012 6:02 PM